Things related to the 2012 Republican primary

Tell me, over and over and over again, my friend

There’s some other potential big news about the Russia probe that’s flow somewhat under the radar with all the other stuff that came out today: Rick Gates may be about to flip.

Some people say that talking about Trump firing Mueller is gloom pr0n. I don’t think it is, and I think we should be ready to act if and when it happens.

Get ready to protest. Looks like there should be marches all over the country.



Go read a book you illiterate son of a bitch

This article about Bannon’s pseudo-intellectual nonsense that everyone’s been talking about is epic! This isn’t even the highlight:

Bannon, described by one associate as “the most well-read person in Washington,” is known for recommending books to colleagues and friends, according to multiple people who have worked alongside him. He is a voracious reader who devours works of history and political theory “in like an hour,” said a former associate whom Bannon urged to read Sun Tzu’s The Art of War. “He’s like the Rain Man of nationalism.”

THIS is the highlight. I knew Taleb could bring the word soup but this is next level:

“They look like the incarnation of ‘antifragile’ people,” Taleb said of the new administration. “The definition of ‘antifragile’ is having more upside than downside. For example, Obama had little upside because everyone thought he was brilliant and would solve the world’s problems, so when he didn’t it was disappointing. Trump has little downside because he’s already been so heavily criticized. He’s heavily vaccinated because of his checkered history. People have to understand: Trump did not run to be archbishop of Canterbury.”

And this this idiot who pals around with Peter Thiel is a deep thinker too:

Moldbug’s dense, discursive musings on history—“What’s so bad about the Nazis?” he asks in one 2008 post that condemns the Holocaust but questions the moral superiority of the Allies—include a belief in the utility of spreading misinformation that now looks like a template for Trump’s approach to truth. “To believe in nonsense is an unforgeable [sic] demonstration of loyalty. It serves as a political uniform. And if you have a uniform, you have an army,” he writes in a May 2008 post.

In one January 2008 post, titled “How I stopped believing in democracy,” he decries the “Georgetownist worldview” of elites like the late diplomat George Kennan. Moldbug’s writings, coming amid the failure of the U.S. state-building project in Iraq, are hard to parse clearly and are open to multiple interpretations, but the author seems aware that his views are provocative.

There was too much nonsense for me absorb the first time through so I’m going to be rereading it.



But her emails….

Complain all you want about Hillary’s campaign but if not for the private email bullshit that the Times and others got a strange hard-on for she’d be president right now. Well…..

Presidential son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner has corresponded with other administration officials about White House matters through a private email account set up during the transition last December, part of a larger pattern of Trump administration aides using personal email accounts for government business.



This shit is bananas

If this gets through the Senate (I don’t think it will, but I think it will pass the House), we are officially a banana republic:

A Republican lawmaker has put forth an amendment that would stop funding for the special counsel’s Russia investigation 180 days after it becomes law.

The amendment from Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.) would also prevent special counsel Robert Mueller from probing “matters occurring before June 2015,” which is the month Trump announced his presidential bid.



Evil, scandalous and evil, most definitely

Establishment media demanded that Clinton resign for lying about getting a blowjob from an intern.

Establishment media demanded that Obama denounce and renounce Bill Ayers.

Will establishment media demand that Trump condemn white nationalism?

I know the answer is “no”.



Mmm sophisticated mama

You probably heard about this:

Early Saturday morning, President Trump tweeted his gratitude to a social-media super-fan, ­Nicole Mincey, magnifying her praise of him to his 35 million followers.

Here’s the problem: There is no evidence the Twitter feed belongs to someone named Nicole Mincey. And the account, according to experts, bears a lot of signs of a Russia-backed disinformation campaign.

On Sunday, Twitter suspended the Mincey account, known as @ProTrump45, after several other users revealed that it was probably a fake, created to amplify pro-Trump content.

The Post article I linked to goes on to say:

Even as the president has railed against multiple investigations into Russia’s meddling in U.S. politics, he may have become Exhibit A of the foreign government’s influence by elevating a suspected Russia-connected ­social-media user — part (of) a sophisticated campaign to exacerbate disputes in U.S. politics and gain the attention of the most powerful tweeter in the world.

I have one problem here: is it really all that sophisticated?

Don’t get me wrong, I think it’s fascinating and a bit scary that Russian propaganda and right-wing media have merged into one (check out this site that tracks Russian twitter bots and how often they link to Breitbart and Gateway Pundit). But what they’re doing is quite simple. You create an account called DeplorableCindy or whatever and make your avatar a stock photo of a Hooter’s model. Then you rewteet whatever nonsense Sean Hannity or Jim Hoft is babbling about that hour. Sometimes you do something a little fancier than that (as with the Nicole Mincey fabrication described above). But it’s not string theory.

I doubt it has that much influence. The fact that it fooled Dolt45 doesn’t prove anything.








Big disgrace, somebody better put you back into your place

Gerard Baker, the head of the Wall Street Journal newsroom, is a disgrace, and I’m sorry that the story that he fellated Trump for an hour, then called it an interview, then forbade his “newspaper” to release the interview, isn’t getting more attention.

Columbia Journalism Review:

Given the criticisms that Editor in Chief Gerard Baker has faced for his paper’s coverage, and at a time when media transparency is more important than ever, the Journal’s decision to release only excerpts from the interview comes off as aloof. Why its editors made that decision is perhaps less surprising upon reading the full transcript, in which Baker talks with Ivanka Trump about parties in the Hamptons and spends part of his time in the Oval Office discussing, with Trump, Jordan Spieth’s final round at the British Open.

Poynter:

The paper is seen by many in the business as Trump-sympathetic during the campaign, more neutral since but clearly lagging behind competitors these days in breaking impactful stories. This won’t really help its image, at least in the media echo chamber, especially since Baker dominated the session and did so in solicitous fashion toward Trump.

He didn’t press him as he wandered or got facts wrong. He engaged in a mutually flattering back-and-forth with Ivanka Trump when she surfaced (as is her habit when dad is being interviewed) and mentioned seeing Baker at a party in the Hamptons.

Soon enough, the baby Hitler fantasies will be replaced by baby Rupert Murdoch fantasies.