On the Road and In Your Backyard

Good Morning All,

This weekday feature is for Juicers who are are on the road, traveling, or just want to share a little bit of their world via stories and pictures. So many of us rise each morning, eager for something beautiful, inspiring, amazing, subtle, of note, and our community delivers – a view into their world, whether they’re far away or close to home – pictures with a story, with context, with meaning, sometimes just beauty. By concentrating travel updates and tips here, it’s easier for all of us to keep up or find them later.

So please, speak up and share some of your adventures and travel news here, and submit your pictures using our speedy, secure form. You can submit up to 7 pictures at a time, with an overall description and one for each picture.

You can, of course, send an email with pictures if the form gives you trouble, or if you are trying to submit something special, like a zipped archive or a movie. If your pictures are already hosted online, then please email the links with your descriptions.

For each picture, it’s best to provide your commenter screenname, description, where it was taken, and date. It’s tough to keep everyone’s email address and screenname straight, so don’t assume that I remember it “from last time”. More and more, the first photo before the fold will be from a commenter, so making it easy to locate the screenname when I’ve found a compelling photo is crucial.

Have a wonderful day, and enjoy the pictures!

After such a horrible weekend,  I know we can all use some nice pictures. I’ll be catching up on lots of the emailed submissions; because of family reasons later this week, I’ll be scheduling Thursday, Friday, and next Monday (at minimum) off of them.

 

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Summer Menus: August Week 2

Tonight’s bonus recipe is Key Lime Pie Gelato

 

The second week of August and many kids are heading back to school next week. For me, summer doesn’t end until the leaves turn.

Thank the stars JeffreyW has photos to match with just about every menu this week. Here’s his salsa.

 

This week, Tuesday features Fresh Garden Salsa to top some souped up Nachos. 

Click here for the PDF of all this week’s menus: August Week 2 Menus

….and his Bruschetta

 

Thursday features a fresh garden Pasta with Marinated Vegetables and Bruschetta.  And Friday has a ground lamb or turkey Curry Burger. 

Spicy Lamb Burgers by JeffreyW

For the detailed and color-coordinated shopping list, click here: August Week 2 Shopping List.

Bonus Recipe:

Key Lime Pie Gelato

  • Gelato Plain Base (recipe below)
  • 1 graham cracker crust, broken into pieces and frozen (recipe below)
  • 3 tbsps fresh lime juice, preferably Key lime*
  • 2 tsp grated lime zest

Make the Gelato Plain Base and chill as directed. Make the graham cracker crust as directed and freeze.

To make Key Lime Gelato: Gently whisk the limejuice and zest into the base. Pour the mixture into the container of an ice cream machine and churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Just after churning quickly stir in the graham cracker crust pieces, reserving some for garnish. Transfer to an airtight container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving.

*after you mix in the lime and zest, give it a taste and add more limejuice as desired. If you’re prefer it a bit more tangy, you can add up to 2 more tbsp without worrying about consistency.

Graham Cracker Crust

Note: You can substitute graham cracker pieces if you don’t want to make an actual crust. I just like the buttery flavor and texture of the actual crust in the gelato.

For the graham cracker crust: Mix 1/2 cup melted butter, 2 tbsp sugar and 2 cups graham cracker crumbs together. Press firmly onto the bottom of a well buttered 8×8 glass baking dish and bake at 375 degrees F for 10 minutes. Cool and remove from the baking dish, break into bite-size pieces and freeze in a covered container.

This recipe is the base for most gelatos, it’s also good frozen by itself:

Gelato di Crema (Gelato Plain Base)

  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 4 large egg yolk
  • 2/3 cup sugar

In a heavy-bottom saucepan, combine the milk and cream. Place over medium-low heat and cook, stirring occasionally so a skin doesn’t form, until tiny bubbles start to form around the edges and the mixture reaches a temperature of 170°F.

Meanwhile, in a medium heat-proof bowl, whisk the egg yolks until smooth. Gradually whisk in the sugar until it is well incorporated and the mixture is thick and pale yellow. Temper* the egg yolks by very slowly pouring in the hot milk mixture while whisking continuously. Return the custard to the saucepan and place over low heat. Cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until the custard is thick enough to coat the back of the spoon and it reaches a temperature of 185°F. Do not bring to a boil.

*The best way to temper is to add a tablespoon at a time until you’ve added about 1/4 cup. Then you can add a full ladle at a time, slowly.

================

What’s on your plate this weekend?

That’s it for this week.  Hit the comments with any questions. – TaMara








On the Road and In Your Backyard

Good Morning All,

This weekday feature is for Juicers who are are on the road, traveling, or just want to share a little bit of their world via stories and pictures. So many of us rise each morning, eager for something beautiful, inspiring, amazing, subtle, of note, and our community delivers – a view into their world, whether they’re far away or close to home – pictures with a story, with context, with meaning, sometimes just beauty. By concentrating travel updates and tips here, it’s easier for all of us to keep up or find them later.

So please, speak up and share some of your adventures and travel news here, and submit your pictures using our speedy, secure form. You can submit up to 7 pictures at a time, with an overall description and one for each picture.

You can, of course, send an email with pictures if the form gives you trouble, or if you are trying to submit something special, like a zipped archive or a movie. If your pictures are already hosted online, then please email the links with your descriptions.

For each picture, it’s best to provide your commenter screenname, description, where it was taken, and date. It’s tough to keep everyone’s email address and screenname straight, so don’t assume that I remember it “from last time”. More and more, the first photo before the fold will be from a commenter, so making it easy to locate the screenname when I’ve found a compelling photo is crucial.

Have a wonderful day, and enjoy the pictures!

 

Coming up…TRAINS!

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On the Road and In Your Backyard

Good Morning All,

This weekday feature is for Juicers who are are on the road, traveling, or just want to share a little bit of their world via stories and pictures. So many of us rise each morning, eager for something beautiful, inspiring, amazing, subtle, of note, and our community delivers – a view into their world, whether they’re far away or close to home – pictures with a story, with context, with meaning, sometimes just beauty. By concentrating travel updates and tips here, it’s easier for all of us to keep up or find them later.

So please, speak up and share some of your adventures and travel news here, and submit your pictures using our speedy, secure form. You can submit up to 7 pictures at a time, with an overall description and one for each picture.

You can, of course, send an email with pictures if the form gives you trouble, or if you are trying to submit something special, like a zipped archive or a movie. If your pictures are already hosted online, then please email the links with your descriptions.

For each picture, it’s best to provide your commenter screenname, description, where it was taken, and date. It’s tough to keep everyone’s email address and screenname straight, so don’t assume that I remember it “from last time”. More and more, the first photo before the fold will be from a commenter, so making it easy to locate the screenname when I’ve found a compelling photo is crucial.

Have a wonderful day, and enjoy the pictures!

 

Read more



On the Road and In Your Backyard

Good Morning All,

This weekday feature is for Juicers who are are on the road, traveling, or just want to share a little bit of their world via stories and pictures. So many of us rise each morning, eager for something beautiful, inspiring, amazing, subtle, of note, and our community delivers – a view into their world, whether they’re far away or close to home – pictures with a story, with context, with meaning, sometimes just beauty. By concentrating travel updates and tips here, it’s easier for all of us to keep up or find them later.

So please, speak up and share some of your adventures and travel news here, and submit your pictures using our speedy, secure form. <Link coming soon, when form is moved> You can submit up to 7 pictures at a time, with an overall description and one for each picture.

You can, of course, send an email with pictures if the form gives you trouble, or if you are trying to submit something special, like a zipped archive or a movie. If your pictures are already hosted online, then please email the links with your descriptions.

For each submission, it’s best to provide your commenter screenname, description, where it was taken, and date. It’s tough to keep everyone’s email address and screenname straight, so don’t assume that I remember it “from last time”. More and more, the first photo before the fold will be from a commenter, so making it easy to locate the screenname when I’ve found a compelling photo is crucial.

Have a wonderful day, and enjoy the pictures!

 

Due to some competition for my attention, there won’t be more than one Swiss picture for this First of August, Swiss National Day.

One of the many things I’ve always loved and valued in Switzerland is their respect: for historic things, for artists, for tradition, for thinkers, and for the Enlightenment and its interpreted values of peace, prosperity, and freedom of conscience.

 

This is the outside of the HR Giger Museum in the Chateau de Gruyeres, Gruyeres, Switzerland. He occupied it his last 15 or so years. Last time I went there, the Giger Bar was almost open, with oversized Harkonen chairs and bio-organic-looking flooring, roof-beams, furniture, and design elements everywhere. Oddly fitting in a medieval castle.

Giger designed creatures and alien stuff for the Alien and Species movies, and much of Dune. His work is disturbing, often political, highly sexualized, and nightmarish. But there’s something to his horror, especially when you look at one of his giant paintings and scrutinize the detail and complexity and design.

In this photo: the building is part of the castle and is likely centuries old, there’s a a demonic/alien sculpture, a secret society’s commissioned symbol above the door, the famous “population gun” sculpture, and a bio-mechanoid torso of Lil. Quite a huge amount in a small space!

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The Chaos in the White House and North Korea

I like this article because it combines a critique of the Trump administration’s North Korea policy with an implicit analysis of how a strategy might be done.

We live in strange times. In the US’ White House, the politics of misinformation have metastasised. Analysts who wish to discuss traditional US security and diplomatic interests in northeast Asia must therefore contend with an array of demented statements by the president, thick performances of outrage by his closest aides against what they call “the fake news industrial complex”, the weird convergence of US foreign policy with Trump family interests, the crimson visions of Steven K. Bannon, and of course the tendency of US-Russia relations to overshadow all else amid an expanding investigation of the Trump campaign.

For all of that, in the first six months of its existence, the Trump administration has invested considerable time in the North Korea issue and demonstrated thereby an ability to function with a due level of focus. In an April 4 speech at Johns Hopkins University, scholar Jonathan Pollack noted Trump’s assiduousness with North Korea intelligence briefings, and there has been the general sense that this president has, if nothing else, succeeded briefly in appearing to change the terms of debate.

Trump took an activist approach to discussions with Xi Jinping over the North Korea issue, spontaneously sharing his tweet-sized thoughts on Chinese-North Korean relations. Both James Mattis’ remarks at the Shangri-La Dialogue and Rex Tillerson’s extended remarks at the US State Department on May 3 indicated that North Korea and China’s role in influencing the DPRK has been a preeminent area of foreign policy focus.

Then there is Trump’s Twitter account and an uncoordinated set of comments from others.

If Washington’s message to North Korea has been incoherent, Xi Jinping’s government in Beijing has been hearing a more consistent word from the Trump administration: more. As one particularly carefully crafted question put it at the July 11 foreign ministry briefing in Beijing, the US wants more responsibility, more action and more pressure from China on North Korea. Geng Shuang’s answer was to lambaste Washington’s “China responsibility theory” for North Korea, likening the US and DPRK role in the nuclear crisis to a tai-chi duet of “pushing hands”.

Trump’s tweets from last night, and many other comments of his, indicate that he thinks he can bully China into solving the problem. This shows that he doesn’t understand the situation in East Asia or China’s interests. It also smacks of an executive who is accustomed to pushing anything that requires thought or sustained action off onto others.

North Korea’s recent missile tests have been successful. The missiles tested could reach most of the United States. The North Korean statement on the latest test seem to indicate that in addition to testing the missile system, it sent back telemetry that will be helpful in developing its warhead. That seems to suggest there will be another nuclear test soon.

All these systems are still in development, not yet production and full deployment. Their purpose seems to be mainly for deterrence against the United States. We have time to engage China in discussions as to a way to limit North Korea’s nuclear force and to engage North Korea in talks. China can’t solve this alone, nor can we expect North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons program. We will have to give them something to limit it.








Summer Menus: July Week 4

A little late, but luckily August has 5 weeks and I only have 4 weeks of menus, so this will bridge the gap.

I was traveling last week and have my niece for the next week and a half. We had a hiking adventure today, despite a cloudy day. Tomorrow is the county fair and Tuesday we’re on a moose hunt.

But my guess is what she’ll remember most is the duck rescue. Here is an update on the Duck rescue mission.

This week’s menus (printable PDF) can be found here: July Week 4 Menu

Monday features Grilled Beef Kebabs and Asian Coleslaw 

Personally, we’ve been adding corn on the cob to every meal. Also, fresh peaches are everywhere, so if you’re inspired, click here for Peach Week, a bunch of yummy peach recipes in case you might actually have any leftover.

The weekly shopping list can be found here: July Week 4 Shopping List – it’s color coordinated with the recipes, so it’s easy to skip any items you won’t be using.

Thursday spotlights one of my favorite slow-cooker recipes, Portuguese Beef and Friday features Bacon Grilled Cheese.

And since Wednesday’s ingredients include grilled shrimp, this is a must, an oldie but a goody (watch with Captions ON, trust me):

Enjoy!

Bonus recipe:

The dressing will easily last a week in the refrigerator. And you can grill then refrigerate the chicken a night or two before when grilling another meal.

Spicy Peach Dressing

  • 2 large peaches, peeled, pitted and quartered
  • 1/2 cup red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons chopped cilantro (or Italian parsley)
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 jalapeño or other hot pepper, halved and seeded
  • 1/2 cup olive oil

Purée all of the ingredients, except oil, in a blender or food processor until smooth. Continue to blend, on low, while adding oil slowly. Mix until well blended. Refrigerate. Shake well before serving.

Spinach Chicken Salad

  • 3 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves
  • 1/2 small sweet yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 lb cleaned baby spinach leaves
  • 1 cup chopped, toasted walnuts
  • 1 peach, peeled, pitted and thinly sliced
  • 3 ounces crumbled bleu cheese or chevre

Place the chicken in a plastic zipper bag with ½ cup of dressing. Marinate 2 hours in refrigerator. Remove chicken, discard marinade and grill until cooked through (170 degrees at center).

Toss the spinach, onion, walnuts and cheese with the remaining 3/4 cup dressing. Slice the grilled chicken and arrange on top of the salad.

Serving: 4 to 6

What’s on your plate this week?