The Hazards of Working From Home

Sometimes working at home is not as easy as it should be.

For whatever reason, the paperwork I am trying to use is so much more comfortable than anything else in the house, to include the two catbeds he has in different rooms.

And, of course, I am the jerk for daring to wake him up.








Friday Beer Blogging: Make It Yourownself (Plus BONUS Cat Blogging with FLAIR)

By popular demand, this week we raise a chipped stein to the folks who get their beer the old-fashioned way: by making it theirownselves.

Homebrew 3

A short story; bear with me. Picture a freshman dorm in Colorado. Two friends have to run out to the homebrew supplier so it’s up to me to watch ten gallons of boiling, stinking pumpkin beer mash. For those of you who aren’t brewers, that’s roughly what it would smell like if Halloween died in a hot, sealed room and stayed there for a week. Rachel, a feared RA who loved nothing more than to bust students doing outlawed things like brewing beer, wanders in holding her nose.

“Whad are you doing?”
“Uh, ”
“Cooking dinner.”
“Seembs like a lod…”
“Guests.”
“Whad is dat?”
“…Gazpacho. Ukranian pumpkin stew. It’s a family specialty. Want to try some?”
“Gick.”
“Your loss. Sorry about the smell.”

I like to think that some day in the future she grabbed a waiter at a fine restaurant and declared, “I’ve seen gazpacho, and THAT’S NOT GAZPACHO.” Or something to that effect. The beer was worth the wait.

Have a secret recipe? A yeast/malt/hops combination that shames Rochefort #10? Have at it in the comments.

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In the spirit of making it yourownself, this week’s non-beer alternative is glogg, a Swedish holiday drink that’s served like tea. Goes to your head faster than warm sake if you’re not careful.

glogg 2

You can find a classic recipe here, but you can do just as well with a neutral alcohol like vodka, some sugar and whole ripe fruit of your choice. Mix the alcohol, sugar and fruit in a large mason jar, leave in a closet and forget about it for a year or so. Then add spices and serve warm. Alternatively, a friend with a pear tree simply pulls pears off his tree, steeps them in vodka for a year and serves it cold in a shotglass. Delicious. His favorite trick is to tie a narrow-mouthed jar to the pear bud and let the pear grow inside it.

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Bonus links:

* Beer and microscopes with polarizing condensers. Cool.
* Find about more about homebrewing from the American Homebrewers Association.
* Image sources: here, and here.

*** Update ***

[from John] A Friday twofer: Beerblog, plus Cat Blogging (with flair!)


Tunch on the printer posing.


Posing is hard work.