Thursday Morning Open Thread: Tell It, Senator Warren!

As is her wont, Warren is serving as point-person here. And — as is hers — Speaker Pelosi is proceeding, with all due deliberation, along the same path:








Late Night Schadenfreude Open Thread: Lock HIM Up!

Politico, “Democrats weigh a ‘Benghazi Trump’ strategy”:

Democrats may not be able to saddle President Donald Trump with impeachment proceedings or pry documents from his administration, but they have another means of bludgeoning him: hearings, hearings and more hearings.
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Monday Morning Open Thread: We (Must) Persist

Karen Tumulty, at the Washington Post“Here’s what’s next for Cecile Richards”:

In the eyes of the antiabortion movement, Richards was the elegantly dressed, politically savvy personification of evil. But during her years as Planned Parenthood’s leader, its membership nearly quadrupled, from 2.5 million supporters to more than 11 million. After she stepped down about a year ago, there was much speculation — and hope, among her admirers — that she would run for office.

But instead, Richards — who spent her years after graduating from Brown University working to unionize low-paid hotel and hospital workers — is returning to her political roots as an organizer. On Monday, she will launch a new organization called Supermajority that seeks not only to change that mind-set but also to provide resources and training for female activists across the spectrum of backgrounds and life experiences.

Her partners in the endeavor include Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza; Ai-jen Poo, who was awarded a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant in 2014 for her efforts to organize domestic workers; and Libby Chamberlain and Cortney Tunis, who lead Pantsuit Nation, the organization that grew out of the private Facebook group Chamberlain started for Hillary Clinton supporters during the 2016 presidential election, and which now counts more than 3.8 million members.

“In many ways, women have been doing all this work — whether it’s running their PTA, or organizing around reproductive health care — but we haven’t been doing it together,” Richards said. “What are we going to do to make this moment not something that is just a fleeting flash point of activism, but actually creating a permanent organizing ability for women?”…

“The issues we share as women are deep, and they are wide, and they’re very similar across the country. But we have to be in rooms with women that we don’t know,” she said. “I know that there are many more of us, even though we don’t come from the same backgrounds. I don’t know what the model for that is. It’s not something that we have done.”

Women now have the force of a majority in politics. Richards wants them to start acting like one.

Supplementary:

And a note from our own BettyCracker:

If any of y’all are looking for an organization that is addressing the critical need for information and assistance with obtaining voter ID, I highly recommend VoteRiders.org. There are more than 20 million eligible voters who lack the proper ID, thanks to Republican initiatives to make it harder to vote, and many more who aren’t sure whether they’ve got the right ID or not. VoteRiders provides free information and assistance with obtaining ID, and they’re looking for volunteers.








Tuesday Morning Open Thread: Stanning for My Favorite Senator (& Hopefully Future President)


 
SHE IS (deservedly) GETTING NOTICED, MORE AND MORE…


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Excellent Reads: The Washington Post Takes Much-Deserved Victory Lap

Book critic Carlos Lozada:

The Mueller report is that rare Washington tell-all that surpasses its pre-publication hype.

Sure, it is a little longer than necessary. Too many footnotes and distracting redactions. The writing is often flat, and the first half of the book drags, covering plenty of terrain that has been described elsewhere. The story shifts abruptly between riveting insider tales and dense legalisms. Its protagonist doesn’t really come alive until halfway through, once Volume I (on Russian interference) gives way to Volume II (on obstruction of justice). The title — far too prosaic, really — feels like a missed opportunity. And it hardly helps that the book’s earliest reviewer, Attorney General William Barr, seems to have willfully misunderstood the point of it; he probably should not have been assigned to review it at all.

Yet as an authoritative account, the Mueller report is the best book by far on the workings of the Trump presidency. It was delivered to the attorney general but is also written for history. The book reveals the president in all his impulsiveness, insecurity and growing disregard for rules and norms; White House aides alternating between deference to the man and defiance of his “crazy s—” requests; and a campaign team too inept to realize, or too reckless to care, when they might have been bending the law. And special counsel Robert Mueller has it all under oath, on the record, along with interviews and contemporaneous notes backing it up. No need for a “Note on Use of Anonymous Sources” disclaimer. Mueller doesn’t just have receipts — he seems to know what almost everyone wanted to buy.

Befitting a best-selling work of political nonfiction — less than 24 hours after the report went online Thursday, paperback versions took the top two spots in Amazon’s new-release sales ranking — the Mueller report has its miniseries-ready signature moments. There is the obligatory expletive for the ages, when President Trump learns that Mueller has been appointed as special counsel. “This is the end of my presidency,” he moans. “I’m fucked.” There is the embarrassing contradiction from the president’s press secretary, Sarah Sanders, who told reporters that countless FBI employees loved the firing of director James Comey but then admits to investigators that she’d made it up. (Though, in truth, it’s only embarrassing if Sanders maintains any residual capacity for said emotion.) There’s the contrast between the president’s public bluster, evident in his Twitter rants, and his private diffidence, embodied in Trump’s lawyerly written responses to Mueller’s queries, full of “I do not recall” and “I have no recollection.”…

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Columnist Anne Applebaum, “Trump is not vindicated. But I am”:

But not only me: Everyone who began writing about the weird connections between Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and the Russian government in the spring and summer of 2016, is vindicated: Sarah Kendzior, Josh Rogin and Franklin Foer, for example. But, of course, there were many more. As it turns out, the Russian attempts to assist the Trump campaign were deep and broad, and those who described them, even if tentatively at first, were right to do so…
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