Late Night Hate-Fic Open Thread: Entertaining But *Very* NSFW

Owen Ellickson is an evil genius, and if you have a taste for nasty political humor you should most definitely be reading him on the regular. Just not at work, or around people with delicate sensibilities…



Late Night Open Thread: Media Village Idiots, Projecting Harder Than An Octoplex of IMAXes


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Hillary Clinton’s “Alt-Right” Speech in Nevada

Flagged by valued commenter Trentrunner, this tweet sums it up perfectly:

She burned the fucking Trump campaign to the ground and pissed on the ashes — in a remarkably ladylike fashion. Then she scooped up the piss-soaked ashes with a trowel, loaded them into a clown cannon and shot them into a toxic waste dump. Then she hopped into a fighter jet and strafed the dump. Then she took a space shuttle out of mothballs, strapped a nuclear warhead into it, flew up to the fucking International Space Station and then nuked the piss-soaked ashes of the dumped, bullet-ridden campaign from orbit.

Or maybe Clinton merely provided a succinct overview of Trump’s decades-long history of race-baiting sleaze, called him out for cultivating neo-Nazi scum supporters, excoriated him for elevating crazy people like Alex Jones and denounced him for putting white nationalist pukes in charge of his campaign. In either case, it was glorious. You can catch a replay of the speech in the thread downstairs.



Live Feeds, We’ve Got Your Live Feeds!

But you need to bring your own popcorn!

Here’s the live feed for Secretary Clinton’s speech/rally in Nevada. Below it is the link to the live feed for the Trump speech/rally in New Hampshire that is ongoing. Fair and balanced, both sides, shapes of earth, etc, etc…



Open Thread: Donald Trump Has A New Good-Luck Charm

UKIP founder Nigel Farage, the original “Mr. Brexit”. Per Politico:

The former head of the United Kingdom Independence Party will not offer an endorsement of Trump, a source close to Farage said, but will instead offer remarks on how to beat the odds and win an election.

“It came about after his visit to the Cleveland convention,” the source said. “He’s not here to endorse Trump but explain the Brexit story which has similar parallels to the current presidential race — he is going to be talking to grassroots activists about Brexit.”

The Trump campaign did not respond to requests for comment.

Farage was already in Mississippi Wednesday morning, where he did an in-studio radio interview. The source close to him said he will attend a private reception with Trump and 600 Republican donors Wednesday, where he will also be joined by Aaron Banks, a friend of Farage’s and a multimillionaire who bankrolled the U.K. Independence Party…

“Donald Trump dares to talk about things other people want to brush under the carpet,” Farage said in a CNN interview last June. “I think for the United Kingdom, I think Trump will be better for us than Barack Obama’s been. Of that, there is no doubt.”…

To quote NYMag‘s Jon Chait, “There’s Just One Flaw in Donald Trump’s New Plan to Show He’s Not Racist“:

The main difficulty Trump faces in dispelling the impression that he is a racist is that Trump is, in fact, a gigantic racist. His first appearance in the New York Times came in the context of his being caught refusing to rent apartments to African-Americans. A former Trump employee has detailed a series of private racist statements and acts — saying “laziness is a trait in blacks,” objecting to black people working for him in accounting, his staff shooing black people off the casino floor when he arrived. Trump has replied that the comments were “probably true,” but berated the person who made them as a “loser.” He has questioned the legitimacy of President Obama’s birth certificate, called him a “terrible student,” and implied he only made it into Harvard Law School due to affirmative action…



Lines On the Map: The Human Geography of the US’s Southern Border

ghmap

(Map 1: US Borders Prior to the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo*)

With all the discussion, both in the current election cycle and year in and year out, about immigration to the US, as well as how to secure the US’s southern border, what often gets ignored is how the US got its southern border. Specifically the human geography of the southwestern US and their relationship to its border. After the conclusion of the Mexican War, in February 1848, the US and Mexico completed the negotiation of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo did several things, but among them it moved the US’s southern and western borders to roughly where they are now. Basically we moved the line on the map. As was, and still is, the case when borders are drawn the people living on either side of the old and/or new borders do not always pay a lot of attention to that border in their daily lives. This can be seen in kinship maps of various parts of the world where borders were drawn, often by people far from where the borders were or would be, that subdivided or bisected members of kinship groups into separate states regardless of the reality on the ground. You can see this on ethnic maps throughout Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and other parts of the world.

This is also the reality with the US’s southern border. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo officially moved the lines on the map, but the day to day experience – the pattern of human settlement and the human geography of the region did not really change. Sure, more of what we now call non-Hispanic whites moved into New Mexico and west Texas and Arizona and Southern California, but the overall human geography – the people, places, and things that make up that pattern of human settlement didn’t change all that much. If you look at the pattern of settlement, based on 2010 Census data, you’ll see that where Hispanics and Latinos were living in the southern US hasn’t changed a lot. The highest density areas are still in the southwest.

hispanic

(Map 2: Hispanic or Latino Population of the US**)

You’ll notice that on both the map prepared for the negotiations of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Rural Health Information’s map of Hispanic or Latino population of the US based on the 2010 Census that the area that the US would get from Mexico in 1848 is still where the largest percentage of the Hispanic or Latino population of the US live. This doesn’t count south Florida, which has a different historic pattern of Hispanic settlement. What the patterns of settlement shown on the maps show us is that the border was moved on the map, but the pattern of settlement remained largely unchanged.

And off and on for almost a hundred years that border was open. People went back and forth for familial reasons, for economic reasons, for social reasons, and for political reasons (don’t forget the Mormon exodus to Mexico in the late 19th Century and their return to the US in the early 20th Century). At different times throughout the 20th Century there have been attempts to seal the southern border for security reasons, which were sometimes/often conflated with xenophobia and anti-immigration sentiment. There were also attempts by the Mexican government to police their northern border to prevent (accused) criminals from crossing into the US illegally to escape justice. And all of these, over the course of a decade in the 1940s into the 1950s culminated with Operation Wetback – the last, named operation to deal with the issue at that point in time. These efforts to regulate the southern border also included guest worker programs, like the early 1940s Bracero Program. In the 1980s the Reagan Administration pushed the Immigration and Reform Act of 1986 that included a pathway to citizenship. Later, in the 1990s, there was Operation Gatekeeper, the Clinton Administration attempt to secure the southern border. And there was also the disastrous impact of NAFTA and the war on drugs on Mexico’s economy, driving millions north in search of work to support themselves and their relatives at home. And through it all the pattern of settlement in the southwestern US has not changed very much. Until this reality – that the border may have been moved in 1848, but not the demographics of the population – is acknowledged in the debate on what to do with the migration across the US’s southern border, then it will not be possible to formulate feasible, acceptable, and suitable policies for immigration into the US across the southern border and how to best regulate and regularize it.

* Map found here.

** Map found here.



Wednesday Morning Open Thread: Wonky Works

Apart from committing to GOTV, what’s on the agenda for the day?