Louisiana Flooding and Donation Information REPOST and UPDATE

13934696_1068732409908368_6540577803550946174_n

Photo from MG Miller Facebook post 

Reposting this from last night. And adding this update to the mix.

From Nola.com

As New Orleans and North Shore residents look for ways to help those affected by the historic flooding in Baton Rouge and across Acadiana, Louisiana State Police are still asking for roadways to remain clear. So, as we wait for the water to continue receding from local roads and highways, here’s a list of places online and around New Orleans and Baton Rouge where you can make donations.

From there, the organizations can arrange safe transport for donated items.

Looking for ways to help pets? You can find those specific needs by clicking here.

Out-of-state and looking to mail items? Get that info here.

Volunteer Louisiana is another source for those looking for state-wide opportunities to volunteer or donate funds. The state-run website includes links and information on a variety of organizations.

Reposted from last night:

Photo from Jeffrey Major Facebook post

My Facebook page has been full of tragic photos, so I asked Louisiana commenter jacy if she could put together information on donations and general information.

Photo from MG Miller Facebook post

From jacy:

While the news is preoccupied with Hillary’s emails and Donald Trump’s racist world salad of the day, Louisiana is drowning.  I’m here in the middle of it, and I’m telling you that this is a genuine, epic disaster that is still unfolding.  It’s hard to describe the scope of it, but here are some numbers:

11 confirmed dead.

40,000 homes destroyed

30,000 people rescued by boat, helicopter, and high water vehicle

20 parishes (that’s a county if you’re not in Louisiana) have been so far declared federal disaster areas.

Denham Springs (pop. 10,000) 90% underwater.  More towns, large and small, devastated.

There are more than 20,000 people in shelters across the area. (That doesn’t count people who have been displaced and have been taken in by friends, relatives, strangers with an extra cot, or are staying in hotels)

Uncounted business, large and small, completely flooded or damaged enough that it will be weeks before they reopen.

4 days of closed Interstates, so no movement of supplies or people in or out of the area.

30 feet above flood stage for the Amite and Comite Rivers, which has no historical precedent.  Some of the rivers will not crest until Wednesday. Smaller tributaries won’t crest until the coming weekend.

The Baton Rouge metro area is home to 830,000 people – and it has been brought to a standstill.

Tens of thousands of displaced critters – the Lamar Dixon Expo Center, which has a giant livestock barn, is full to the seams with dogs and cats and other animals plucked from the flood waters, stacked in kennels awaiting a reunion with their owners.

I’ve heard it said that the this hasn’t come to the forefront of the national consciousness because it was a storm that didn’t have a name. No hurricane, not even a tropical storm. But in many ways the fact that it wasn’t a recognized storm system increased the scope of the disaster. You see, it was just some rain. But it didn’t stop. It didn’t stop for days, just sat over Southern Louisiana and inundated it. Nobody was prepared. Nobody saw it coming. They’re calling it a once-in-a-thousand-years event. And because it’s flooding places that have NEVER flooded, a lot of people didn’t have flood insurance.

And on the national news, the few minutes dedicated to it almost make it seem like a passing human interest story.  Charming little stories of the “Cajun Navy” out in their bateaux, paddling up and down what used to be neat residential streets and plucking people and pets out of the water.  What you don’t know is that these people, and a lot of the first responders, are out there with little or no sleep, without eating or stopping, because their homes are already lost and they don’t have any place to go back to. So they just keep going forward, ferrying more lost people and animals to the nearest patch of dry land.

It’s overwhelming. If you want to help, there are a couple things you can do. First of all, spread the story.  This is a major disaster – close to a Katrina-level disaster. (And I lived through Katrina too, so I have a reference point.) If you are anywhere close, volunteer.  If you want to donate, the Red Cross is one way.

My suggestions:

  • If you want to find a way to volunteer or donate visit http://volunteerlouisiana.gov/
  • Second Harvest Food Bank does good work: https://give.no-hunger.org/checkout/donation?eid=91189
  • This happened just as school was about to start and many classrooms were destroyed or damaged. I have several friends who belong to the Associated Professional Educators of Louisiana, and they have a disaster relief fund here to help teachers throughout the area replace their supplies: https://apel.site-ym.com/donations/donate.asp?id=14775
  • The Denham Springs Animal Shelter is the only municipal no-kill shelter in the area. Their facilities were totally destroyed, and it was only through the efforts of their staff that they got the animals out as the floodwaters were rushing in. They have a Go Fund Me page here: https://www.gofundme.com/2jdh3xg4 (You can also visit the website of Louisiana SPCA for more suggestions on how to help other critters throughout the area.)

I was very fortunate to be located in one of the few areas in Baton Rouge that did not flood at all, but there are tens of thousands of people who are devastated. The extent of the loss of life, loss of property, damage, and destruction won’t be clear for a week or more, when the flooding stops and the waters recede.  Keep the people of Southern Louisiana in your thoughts.

Devastating photos, if you click on the photo links you should be able to see many more without a FB account. Meanwhile An Inconvenient Truth is streaming on both HULU and Netflix. But hey, Al Gore is fat, so it doesn’t matter, right?

I’m in meetings most of the rest of the day, but I’ll check back and see if you need any other information. Add any updates to the comments as you get them.  – TaMara



Trump’s Wisconsin Rally – Now a Policy Speech on Law & Order

Apparently the rally is now a teleprompter driven policy speech on law and order. Live feed embedded below:



Louisiana Flooding And Donation Information

Photo from MG Miller Facebook post 

Photo from Jeffrey Major Facebook post

My Facebook page has been full of tragic photos, so I asked Louisiana commenter jacy if she could put together information on donations and general information.

Photo from MG Miller Facebook post

From jacy:

While the news is preoccupied with Hillary’s emails and Donald Trump’s racist world salad of the day, Louisiana is drowning.  I’m here in the middle of it, and I’m telling you that this is a genuine, epic disaster that is still unfolding.  It’s hard to describe the scope of it, but here are some numbers:

11 confirmed dead.

40,000 homes destroyed

30,000 people rescued by boat, helicopter, and high water vehicle

20 parishes (that’s a county if you’re not in Louisiana) have been so far declared federal disaster areas.

Denham Springs (pop. 10,000) 90% underwater.  More towns, large and small, devastated.

There are more than 20,000 people in shelters across the area. (That doesn’t count people who have been displaced and have been taken in by friends, relatives, strangers with an extra cot, or are staying in hotels)

Uncounted business, large and small, completely flooded or damaged enough that it will be weeks before they reopen.

4 days of closed Interstates, so no movement of supplies or people in or out of the area.

30 feet above flood stage for the Amite and Comite Rivers, which has no historical precedent.  Some of the rivers will not crest until Wednesday. Smaller tributaries won’t crest until the coming weekend.

The Baton Rouge metro area is home to 830,000 people – and it has been brought to a standstill.

Tens of thousands of displaced critters – the Lamar Dixon Expo Center, which has a giant livestock barn, is full to the seams with dogs and cats and other animals plucked from the flood waters, stacked in kennels awaiting a reunion with their owners.

I’ve heard it said that the this hasn’t come to the forefront of the national consciousness because it was a storm that didn’t have a name. No hurricane, not even a tropical storm. But in many ways the fact that it wasn’t a recognized storm system increased the scope of the disaster. You see, it was just some rain. But it didn’t stop. It didn’t stop for days, just sat over Southern Louisiana and inundated it. Nobody was prepared. Nobody saw it coming. They’re calling it a once-in-a-thousand-years event. And because it’s flooding places that have NEVER flooded, a lot of people didn’t have flood insurance.

And on the national news, the few minutes dedicated to it almost make it seem like a passing human interest story.  Charming little stories of the “Cajun Navy” out in their bateaux, paddling up and down what used to be neat residential streets and plucking people and pets out of the water.  What you don’t know is that these people, and a lot of the first responders, are out there with little or no sleep, without eating or stopping, because their homes are already lost and they don’t have any place to go back to. So they just keep going forward, ferrying more lost people and animals to the nearest patch of dry land.

It’s overwhelming. If you want to help, there are a couple things you can do. First of all, spread the story.  This is a major disaster – close to a Katrina-level disaster. (And I lived through Katrina too, so I have a reference point.) If you are anywhere close, volunteer.  If you want to donate, the Red Cross is one way.

My suggestions:

  • If you want to find a way to volunteer or donate visit http://volunteerlouisiana.gov/
  • Second Harvest Food Bank does good work: https://give.no-hunger.org/checkout/donation?eid=91189
  • This happened just as school was about to start and many classrooms were destroyed or damaged. I have several friends who belong to the Associated Professional Educators of Louisiana, and they have a disaster relief fund here to help teachers throughout the area replace their supplies: https://apel.site-ym.com/donations/donate.asp?id=14775
  • The Denham Springs Animal Shelter is the only municipal no-kill shelter in the area. Their facilities were totally destroyed, and it was only through the efforts of their staff that they got the animals out as the floodwaters were rushing in. They have a Go Fund Me page here: https://www.gofundme.com/2jdh3xg4 (You can also visit the website of Louisiana SPCA for more suggestions on how to help other critters throughout the area.)

I was very fortunate to be located in one of the few areas in Baton Rouge that did not flood at all, but there are tens of thousands of people who are devastated. The extent of the loss of life, loss of property, damage, and destruction won’t be clear for a week or more, when the flooding stops and the waters recede.  Keep the people of Southern Louisiana in your thoughts.

Devastating photos, if you click on the photo links you should be able to see many more without a FB account. Meanwhile An Inconvenient Truth is streaming on both HULU and Netflix. But hey, Al Gore is fat, so it doesn’t matter, right?



Flown

The little finches below have cleverly created an apartment complex in the ruff of a palm tree located in the increasingly fashionable (i.e., Disney-fied) Ybor City section of Tampa:

Finches

I’ve been thinking about nests a lot lately because mine is about to be empty. The fledgling is flying off to college this week, leaving her father and myself without a chick to look after for the first time in nearly two decades. Damn. It’s both liberating and devastating.

The liberating part: We no longer have to set a good example / make sure no one decides to stage a bubble party in our home in our absence, so we can wander around Ybor City on a Sunday afternoon, catching a movie, drinking beer, eating pizza, watching finches and contemplating the explosion in the number of tattoo shops:

walkens welcome

We didn’t Walken to get tattoos, but we talked about it in a non-serious way, competing to come up with the tattoo idea that our daughter would find the most embarrassing. (KISS face tattoos! Kid’s baby picture reproduced on our calves!)

Also, we’re thinking about moving further out into the country now that the only resident who would be dismayed by that notion is decamping, so we looked at some potential new homes this weekend too. At one property, we saw this gigantic spider:

giant spider

I’ve included a photo of it next to a normal-sized flood light so you can contemplate the scale of the creature. There were several such specimens around the empty house; I walked around waving a stick in front of me so I wouldn’t accidentally face-plant in Shelob’s web.

Had any neighbors been around to see that (and they weren’t; the point is to have no close-by neighbors), they might have mistaken the stick-waving for some odd ritual to expel evil spirits. And from my perspective, they wouldn’t have been wrong, though the mister assures me those spiders are perfectly harmless. But I maintain that anything that can make me flee in panic into a tree hard enough to get a concussion isn’t harmless!

In the meantime, we plan to turn the kid’s old room into a nano-brewery, freeing up the current office / guest room from its shelves of carboys, bottling equipment, etc. Summer will end soon, and it will be beer brewing time again, thank FSM.

But this turn of the seasons will rob our home of its heart in many ways. The kid isn’t going far; she’ll be within half an hour of the mother ship, and even if we move, we’ll be close enough that she could conceivably live with us again and commute to school if she wanted.

But she won’t want to, at least not on any kind of long-term basis. We’ve done our jobs well enough to become obsolete. There is great pride in that, but great sorrow too.

Please feel free to discuss whatever. Open thread!



Clever Birds and Angry Hens (Open Thread)

I was taken aback just now to look out the window and see this unimaginably huge hot plasma sphere in the sky. The sun has returned to the Sunshine State! It’s been raining for days, and we’re all kinda crabby about it.

The rain created a new canal adjacent to a Gulf Coast beach dwelling parking lot. A black-crowned night heron checked it out to see if there were any fish:

Nah. But this snowy egret, blue heron and willet (I think) are on the right track:

Image

I’d share a photo of my angry, sodden hens, but they basically screech “fuck you!” every time I show my face outside. They seem to think I control the weather and blame me for the muddy conditions.

Anyhoo, open thread!

PS: Important reminder from valued commenter BR: If you haven’t already, sign up to volunteer for HRC’s campaign. Every time a new volunteer signs up, a racist, sexist, self-aggrandizing demagogue gets closer to a humiliating defeat!



Lord o’ the Flies

It has been raining here in West Central Florida for days, and according to the radar, it’s going to keep on raining. That means lots of standing water, which translates into a bumper crop of mosquitoes. Luckily there’s not some dread disease being transmitted by mosquitoes in Florida! Oh wait

herald zika tracker  160808

The Feds skipped town without funding Zika relief efforts because the GOP attached riders to defund Obamacare, put new restrictions on Planned Parenthood and permit flying the Confederate flag at veteran’s cemeteries. But at least the state is on it:

“You have a great governor who’s doing a fantastic job, Rick Scott, on the Zika,” Donald Trump told WPEC-TV of West Palm Beach. “He’s going to have it under control. He probably already does.”

Well, that’s reassuring. And for women who contract the virus while pregnant and find out they’re carrying a fetus with profound birth defects, Marco Rubio wants to make sure they don’t have access to abortion:

Sen. Marco Rubio said Saturday that he doesn’t believe a pregnant woman infected with the Zika virus should have the right to an abortion — even if she had reason to believe the child would be born with severe microcephaly.

“I understand a lot of people disagree with my view – but I believe that all human life is worthy of protection of our laws. And when you present it in the context of Zika or any prenatal condition, it’s a difficult question and a hard one,” Rubio told POLITICO.

“But if I’m going to err, I’m going to err on the side of life.”

Raising a child with severe Zika-caused birth defects can cost about $2 million in the first few years of life — if the child survives. But count on Rubio and his fellow Republicans to err on the side of tax cuts when it comes time to fund public health initiatives. The fuckers.

Anyway, that’s what has me pissed off today. You? Open thread!



Thursday Evening Open Thread: He’s Certainly Earned It…

… and it may actually distract the Twitchykin from attacking Hillary, at least for a few hours on Saturday. Per The Hill:

Obama is celebrating his 55th birthday Friday night with a star-studded celebration at the White House, with Beyoncé and Jay Z attending. Kendrick Lamar, the president’s favorite rapper, will also show up, according to the New York Post.

R&B star Usher will perform for the first couple and their guests.

It’s Obama’s last birthday as president, and he is planning to go out in style.

Several stars from the worlds of entertainment, sports and music have scored an invite. The guests include comedian Ellen DeGeneres, singer Stevie Wonder, Vogue editor Anna Wintour, singer and actress Jennifer Hudson and basketball legends Magic Johnson and Alonzo Mourning…

The party is taking place one day before the Obama family leaves for its annual vacation on Martha’s Vineyard, Mass.

Obama’s birthday falls on Thursday, and he is keeping things strictly business, according to his public schedule…

Happy birthday, Mr. President, and may nothing more immanently serious than Donald Trump’s campaign interrupt your vacation.

***********
What else is on the agenda as we prepare to wrap up another busy week?