Early Morning Open Thread: Very Young Rescues

From commentor Bella:

I boarded my horse at a county park in CA, which became a dumping ground for unwanted cats and dogs. A couple of us joined forces and started trapping cats, fixing them, and getting the tame ones to an adoption group. We got over 120 cats and a handful of dogs out of the park (and fed the rest.) A man who walked his dog there knew that I did this, and flagged me down one cold Sunday morning to let me know he’d found a tiny kitten crying by the gate. I had no trouble finding the little tabby, 3 weeks old at most, because it was not so much crying as shrieking. My guess is mama was moving the litter and was late coming back for this one.
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I put her in my car and ran into Walmart to get some kitten milk and a syringe to try to feed her, which mostly resulted in milk all over the kitten, as she never did stop wailing. I called our rescue lady and was soon on my way over there. As luck would have it, she had a nursing mama who was willing to accept the newcomer, and the kitten was soon warm and fed, and a couple of months later she was adopted to a good home.


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Early Morning Open Thread: Foster Cats

From commentor FoxinSocks:

About a year and a half ago, I found out from a friend about three cats who were going to be shot and killed on a farm in West Virginia. I was unemployed at the time and exceedingly broke, but no one else would help them, so me and my friend made the short trip across the state line to pick them up. So there I was, with three sick and malnourished but very grateful kitties in my bathroom. Luckily for me, I was referred to the wonderful folks at the Montgomery County MD SPCA who helped me vet and place the cats. Now, over a year later, I’m a foster with the MCSPCA with a new group of kitties, but times are tough, as bad as I’ve ever seen, and all the rescue groups are struggling…
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This is Chip, an eight-year-old Tabby who was given up by his family. The family claimed he couldn’t be handled and that he had litter box issues, but he’s been great for me. Heck, I can barely get him off my lap! I call Chip the WB Frog cat though, because at home, he’s this loving, devoted cat and at the shows, he’s miserable and grumpy. So I tell people how wonderful he is and then they see him in person and he’s nothing like I’ve described. But I swear, he’s a friendly boy!

Chip’s Petfinder listing

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Animal Rescue Open Thread

All animals should be living large like this:

Not like this:

Click here to donate directly to Charlie’s Angels Animal Rescue (they accept paypal!), or visit the Balloon Juice store and pick out an item or two- all proceeds go to Charlie’s Angels. Your help saves animals, and unlike a lot of charities, I can assure you that every single penny these ladies at CAAR get is spent on the animals.



Early Morning Open Thread: Full House

From commentor IlsaLund:

This is Clary, AKA Miss Pants. She was originally adopted as a kitten by a neighbor. The neighbor died suddenly and Clary was trapped in her apartment for four days before being freed. No one wanted her and I’d already said no because we had two 17 yr olds at the time and I thought bringing in a young cat would be too traumatic for them. But when my husband heard the sad tale, he insisted that we adopt her. When he went to take her home, he and Clary took one look at each other and they both fell madly in love. She’s been with us for four years now. I love her madly, too, but she will always be Daddy’s Girl.

Luci was adopted 2 yrs ago, along with her companion, Princess. I found them on Petfinders after the two elderly cats died in 2008. Clary was devastated to lose them and miserable being an only cat. Plus, Clary was so attached to my husband that I sort of felt l needed a cat for me. I wanted one young cat and I got two seniors, now about 11 years old. Luci is the tiniest, but she is Top Cat. She spends most of her time sleeping in my closet, but when she feels like it, she runs and plays like a kitten.

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Inside Baseball for Nerds: “American Bridge”

Greg Sargent, at the WaPo’s Plum Line, says that “David Brock’s big-money outside group gains steam“:

It looks like David Brock is getting more serious about building a powerful apparatus on the left to go head-to-head with the flood of outside money conservative groups are planning to pump into the 2012 elections.
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I’m told that Brock has made some major staff shifts within his Media Matters empire in preparation for 2012, shifting key staff over to a new third-party spending vehicle he’s created to spend big money on campaigns this cycle, which is called American Bridge.
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Brock will move Media Matters’ top communications director, Chris Harris, over to American Bridge, and he’s installing a new president and CEO at Media Matters, Matthew Butler. That will allow Brock to focus more energy on building out the new effort and enlisting major donors to finance it.
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Also: In another indication that Brock is shifting his empire harder into politics, he has enlisted one of the key architects of MoveOn’s growth over the last few years — operative Ilyse Hogue — to oversee a new Media Matters operation dedicated specifically to taking action against right wing media…
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Brock is a major Beltway player, and if his effort gains traction, it could have a real impact on the 2012 campaigns, helping to offset the lopsided advantage conservative groups are expected to enjoy. It’s also a sign that Washington’s power liberal types are getting serious about figuring out how to navigate the new, post-Citizens United landscape, which has clearly put them at a disadvantage.
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More broadly, the shift suggests that the brand of media criticism practiced by Media Matters is shading into outright guerrilla-style political activism against conservative groups and right wing media outlets alike — another symptom of the broader breakdown of old categories that will continue to roil our politics for the foreseeable future.

Interesting, if true. Since this is the Washington Post, y’all know to read the comments at your own risk.