Sunday Morning Garden Chat: Autumnal Greetings

From master gardener & photographer Marvel:

We’re winding down from a fairly mild Summer here in the Willamette Valley — middling highs, coolish nights — our cool-weather plants thrived, but the heat-loving veggies were pretty underwhelming.

This last week we had a few rainy days but sunny warm weather is again forecast for next week. The garden’s in transition. The Fall carrots have decided to put on some welcome, rapid growth; the little Japanese maple out front is rushing into its red finery and the crimson clover cover crop (in the former tomato bed) is sprouting to beat the band.

We’re winding down from a fairly mild Summer here in the Willamette Valley — middling highs, coolish nights — our cool-weather plants thrived, but the heat-loving veggies were pretty underwhelming.

This last week we had a few rainy days but summy warm weather is again forecasted for next week. The garden’s in transition. The Fall carrots have decided to put on some welcome, rapid growth; the little Japanese maple out front is rushing into its red finery and the crimson clover cover crop (in the former tomato bed) is sprouting to beat the band.

We’ll be planting a bedful of garlic next week and otherwise just shuffling around, conserving energy for the big acorn & oak-leaf wrangling that’ll be sure to hit Big Time next month.

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What’s going on in your garden(s), this week?








Sunday Morning Garden Chat: Pretty in Pink

Thanks, as always, to the magical Ozark Hillbilly for another amazing sequence:

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What’s going on in your garden(s), this week?








Sunday Morning Garden Chat: Pond & Path

Many thanks to commentor JR in WV:

The pic at the head of this post is the newly graveled path at the top, just south of the pond. I think they did a good job. This is intended to make a wheel chair / cargo dolly path from the parking area up to the front door, as well as being a nice path through the pawpaw patch and the woods and boulders.

Next two pics are of the new pond.

The liner showing below the stones holding down the liner, I’m still debating what to do. I’ve read somewhere that you can run some moss through a blender with buttermilk and spray that on anything that will be moist and moss will start up pretty quickly. If anyone has learned that elsewhere, let me know.


Before we had big flat rocks against the old liner, but the guys building the pond used those around the pond… before I figured out what was going on. Oh well. I may get into the pond and just try to redo that stuff myself.


This is the first boulder you come to, mossy, I have had mushroom logs leaning on it, and we’ve had the little copper sculpture of the dancing frogs on it for years now. There’s also an old Chinese style lantern behind the sculpture — we get to put junk we collected to use like this. The pond will be full of frogs and tadpoles come next spring, which we love. We missed the song of the frogs the last few springs since the old liner sprang a leak.
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Sunday Morning Garden Chat: “Do Plants Have Something to Say?”

Without going full Direction of the Road, I can conceptualize Dr. Gagliano’s perspective as described here:

Monica Gagliano says that she has received Yoda-like advice from trees and shrubbery. She recalls being rocked like a baby by the spirit of a fern. She has ridden on the back of an invisible bear conjured by an osha root. She once accidentally bent space and time while playing the ocarina, an ancient wind instrument, in a redwood forest. “Oryngham,” she says, means “thank you” in plant language. These interactions have taken place in dreams, visions, songs and telekinetic interactions, sometimes with the help of shamans or ayahuasca.

This has all gone on around the same time as Dr. Gagliano’s scientific research, which has broken boundaries in the field of plant behavior and signaling. Currently at the University of Sydney in Australia, she has published a number of studies that support the view that plants are, to some extent, intelligent. Her experiments suggest that they can learn behaviors and remember them. Her work also suggests that plants can “hear” running water and even produce clicking noises, perhaps to communicate.

Plants have directly shaped her experiments and career path. In 2012, she says, an oak tree assured her that a risky grant application — proposing research on sound communication in plants — would be successful. “You are here to tell our stories,” the tree told her.

“These experiences are not like, ‘Oh you’re a weirdo, this is happening just to you,’” Dr. Gagliano said. Learning from plants, she said, is a long-documented ceremonial practice (if not one typically endorsed by scientists).

“This is part of the repertoire of human experiences,” she said. “We’ve been doing this forever and ever, and are still doing this.”…

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What’s going on in your garden(s), this week?








Sunday Morning Garden Chat: Arboreal Surprises

(Yup… nobody sent pics *this* week, either!)

What’s going on in your garden(s), this week?