Couch Surfer Evicted

The world’s worst couch surfer was evicted after seven years:

That perp-walk scene reminds me of the video of Saddam Hussein being dragged out of his hidey-hole.

Some snippets from The Post article on the arrest:

Ecuador, which took Assange in when he was facing a Swedish rape investigation in 2012, said it was rescinding asylum because he of his “discourteous and aggressive behavior” and for violating the terms of his asylum…

London’s Metropolitan Police carried out the Thursday morning arrest and said in a statement that they were “invited into the embassy by the ambassador, following the Ecuadorian government’s withdrawal of asylum.” In response, the Russian government accused Britain of “strangling freedom” by taking custody of Assange.

“Strangling freedom” is pretty rich coming from the Russian government. The metaphor could have been more unintentionally ironic — they could have accused Britain of “driving freedom to commit suicide by shooting itself in the head three times and then flinging its despondent body over a balcony railing to the pavement 10 floors below.” Anyhoo, the Russian government’s pet gerbil also spoke up:

From Moscow, fugitive American former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden described the scene of Assange’s arrest as a violation of press freedom. “Images of Ecuador’s ambassador inviting the UK’s secret police into the embassy to drag a publisher of — like it or not — award-winning journalism out of the building are going to end up in the history books,” Snowden wrote on Twitter. “Assange’s critics may cheer, but this is a dark moment for press freedom.”

That Snowden called the London cops who came at the invitation of the Ecuadoran embassy to evict Assange “the UK’s secret police” is a good indicator of the level of hysteria this arrest has evoked from Assange’s dwindling number of defenders. But in the end, the “discourteous and aggressive” couch surfer simply wore out his welcome:

“I think [Ecuadoran President Moreno] has never been comfortable with Assange in the embassy,” [political consultant Sebastián Hurtado] said. “And it’s not like this is an important issue for most Ecuadorans. To be honest, we really don’t care about Assange.”

So, what happens next? The folks who reserve their harshest condemnations of the U.S. government for Democratic administrations — a crowd that when combined with Assange groupies forms a perfect circle in a Venn diagram — may get an object lesson in the difference between Democratic and Republican Party governance.

Trump confessed his love for Wikileaks almost daily in the run-up to the election, and Assange corresponded fondly with Trump Jr. But now that the Trump people are in power, it could be they’ve forgotten the little people who got them there. Compare and contrast:

In the last administration, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. decided against pursuing prosecution of Assange out of concern that WikiLeaks’ argument that it is a journalistic organization would raise thorny First Amendment issues and set an unwelcome precedent.

The Trump administration, however, revisited the question of prosecuting members of WikiLeaks, and last November a court filing error revealed that Assange had been charged under seal… [I]n April 2017, then-CIA Director Mike Pompeo, now secretary of state, characterized WikiLeaks as a “nonstate hostile intelligence service” and a threat to U.S. national security.

Today, it’s arguable that no one has a bigger interest in shutting Assange up than Trump. How ironic if the candidate Wikileaks and its fan club championed as a refreshing alternative to the “hawkish” Clinton ends up “disappearing” their hero.

UPDATE: Breaking news from The Post:

BREAKING: A U.S. federal court unsealed an indictment Thursday against Assange charging him with a single count of conspiracy to disclose classified information that could be used to injure the United States.

PARIS — British authorities arrested WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Thursday in response to a U.S. extradition request after Ecuador rescinded his asylum at its embassy in London, ending a standoff that lasted nearly seven years.

London’s Metropolitan Police said a statement that Assange was “arrested on behalf of the United States authorities” and would “appear in custody at Westminster Magistrates’ Court as soon as possible.”

Assange and crew thought helping a transnational white nationalist movement fomented by Russia to meddle in Western democracies would usher in more “freedom.” Boy was he ever wrong!

As he was dragged out of the embassy, Assange was shouting “RESIST!” at the crowd. If indeed he is extradited here, Assange may find it challenging to motivate the U.S. resistance to the Trump regime to agitate on his behalf, seeing as how he was so instrumental in saddling us with these incompetent fascist wannabes in the first place.

Speaking only for myself, fuck that guy. He’s reaping what he sowed. I’ll reserve my efforts for Trump victims who didn’t help put a racist, sexist, xenophobic demagogue in charge of my country.

208 replies
  1. 1
    The Moar You Know says:

    Fuck that rapist. I hope they give him the fucking chair.

    ReplyReply
  2. 2
    Alain the site fixer says:

    @The Moar You Know: seconded

    ReplyReply
  3. 3
    Alain the site fixer says:

    Also, I’d love to see Snowden on trial for treason, espionage, and a host of other things. He’s not a hero, rather a stooge or, more likely, a villain.

    ReplyReply
  4. 4
    Anya says:

    ”If you wait by the river long enough, the bodies of your enemies will float by.”

    Let’s never forget that Assange hid in the embassy for seven years because he was evading justice after he was charged for sexually assaulting two women.

    ReplyReply
  5. 5
    hueyplong says:

    Not fully awake, but do we wish Assange had been put in this position when Mueller was open for business?

    ReplyReply
  6. 6
    dr. bloor says:

    Boy, he looks like shit on toast in that photo. I guess that’s what happens when the embassy doesn’t let you keep any portraits of yourself in their attic.

    ReplyReply
  7. 7
    Anya says:

    I feel sorry for the police officers who had to drag him out of there. Assange is apparently famous for poor hygiene.

    ReplyReply
  8. 8
    different-church-lady says:

    Oh, the poor dear.

    ReplyReply
  9. 9
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    How ironic if the candidate Wikileaks and its fan club championed…..

    Irony is dead, Betty.

    ReplyReply
  10. 10
    Gin & Tonic says:

    He’s in London, right? Maybe a nice cup of tea?

    ReplyReply
  11. 11
    tobie says:

    I don’t think I will ever understand why ‘transparency advocates’ have such fondness for opaque, right-wing regimes. Kay said in the thread below that they had a fantasy of blowing things up and what easier way to do it than to attack Democrats, who will refrain from retributive justice out of concern for principle and precedent. I think that’s true. But I think there’s also something about white hacker culture. Hacktivists think they rule the world. I’m sure Assange felt that way even while holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy. Now he’s about to learn that rules do apply to him.

    ReplyReply
  12. 12
    MattF says:

    So, I guess… Barr must have approved the extradition. Hmm.

    ReplyReply
  13. 13
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Anya: I have a t-shirt with that exact quote.

    ReplyReply
  14. 14
    Anonymous At Work says:

    Trump is far far worse couch surfer. Assange stayed in one place and was a massive ass-hat but he never demanded that Ecuador take him golfing every weekend at their expense.

    ReplyReply
  15. 15
    tobie says:

    @MattF: My understanding is that Ecuador negotiated that Assange will not be sent to a country with the death penalty. That would be us, though Assange’s crimes would not meet the requirements for the death penalty. Who knows…maybe Barr wants Assange to raise questions about Christopher Steele and Stefan Halper.

    ReplyReply
  16. 16
    Anonymous At Work says:

    Open Thread Comment: Did anyone notice the subtle trolling by the EU in the Brexit deadlines? First time was around April Fool’s Day and the new one is Halloween. Coincidence, I think not!

    ReplyReply
  17. 17
    clay says:

    From Betty:

    That Snowden called the London cops who came at the invitation of the Ecuadoran embassy to evict Assange “the UK’s secret police”

    That jumped out at me right away. Maybe living in Russia makes him assume that secret police are everywhere, but dude needs to seriously get a grip.

    Also, it’s hard to see how ” not letting someone get away with (alleged) sexual assault” = “threat to freedom of press”.

    Also also, it’s hard to see how Assange is part of the press, unless you really stretch things.

    ReplyReply
  18. 18
    Kay says:

    @tobie:

    They flood the zone with yelling “he’s a publisher!” but that isn’t the question. The question is if he solicited the thefts or carried out the thefts. That’s the difference.

    They don’t want to know if he’s a publisher or not. They want to shut down any inquiry, whether it’s a formal legal inquiry or just a public debate. I don’t know if he’s just a publisher and they don’t know either. I have no idea what happens inside Wikileaks because it’s completely opaque and secret.

    Rupert Murdoch is a publisher:

    The News International phone-hacking scandal was a controversy involving the now defunct News of the World and other British newspapers published by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation. Employees of the newspaper were accused of engaging in phone hacking, police bribery, and exercising improper influence in the pursuit of stories. Whilst investigations conducted from 2005 to 2007 appeared to show that the paper’s phone hacking activities were limited to celebrities, politicians, and members of the British Royal Family, in July 2011 it was revealed that the phones of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler, relatives of deceased British soldiers, and victims of the 7 July 2005 London bombings had also been hacked. The resulting public outcry against News Corporation and its owner Rupert Murdoch led to several high-profile resignations, including that of Murdoch as News Corporation director, Murdoch’s son James as executive chairman, Dow Jones chief executive Les Hinton, News International legal manager Tom Crone, and chief executive Rebekah Brooks. The commissioner of London’s Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), Sir Paul Stephenson, also resigned. Advertiser boycotts led to the closure of the News of the World on 10 July 2011, after 168 years of publication.[1] Public pressure shortly forced News Corporation to cancel its proposed takeover of the British satellite broadcaster BSkyB.

    Publisher. Stipulated. The question was – what else was he doing? That’s a legit question, but the Assange Defense Army don’t want anyone to ask it.

    ReplyReply
  19. 19
    geg6 says:

    @The Moar You Know:

    Thirded. I so despise that smelly, rapey piece of garbage.

    ReplyReply
  20. 20
    biff murphy says:

    Looks like he went willingly…First they came for the Russian spy’s cat,then the internet, and then him. Fish and guests start to stink after 3 days… 7 years he’s been holed up making a mess not cleaning up after his cat. Good riddance. Watch tRump pardon this POS

    ReplyReply
  21. 21
    matt says:

    Well, they’re tying up a loose end I see.

    ReplyReply
  22. 22
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @tobie:

    My understanding is that Ecuador negotiated that Assange will not be sent to a country with the death penalty.

    I suspect that is bad reporting because as you point out, it has no bearing on this case.

    ReplyReply
  23. 23
    lee says:

    I like the smirk/smile on the cops face

    ReplyReply
  24. 24
    waspuppet says:

    @tobie: Yeah I’m not sure I’m seeing the “disappearing” referred to in the post. I’m thinking Assange gets a Medal of Freedom and basically any Trump administration job he wants.

    ReplyReply
  25. 25
    The Dangerman says:

    Unless they feed the POS to the sharks on the way over, I don’t see how this is great news for Trump on my first caffeine.

    More importantly, how’s the cat?

    ReplyReply
  26. 26
    p.a. says:

    Goddammit I nearly spit my mouthful of scone out in the middle of the coffee shop when I read the title

    ReplyReply
  27. 27
    Betty Cracker says:

    @waspuppet: See update to post — it looks like the Brits did arrest him at the request of the U.S., according to breaking news from WaPo. If Assange is expecting the Trump admin to be consistent in its treatment of him, he may be in for a nasty surprise.

    ReplyReply
  28. 28
    CliosFanboy says:

    damn, it’s Howard Hughes!!!!

    ReplyReply
  29. 29

    My posts don’t seem to be coming through.

    My original post was:

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    Ahhh ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    Oh, and did I mention, ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    ReplyReply
  30. 30
    germy says:

    On brand to the very end, Julian Assange was holding a copy of Gore Vidal's History of the National Security State as he was dragged from the Ecuadorian embassy. pic.twitter.com/tq8Uytw6o9— Will Martin (@willmartin19) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  31. 31
    mrmoshpotato says:

    I’m sure a jail cell is ready right now for this stinky, rapey Soviet POS. Lady Justice is all set for your arrival, you POS.

    ReplyReply
  32. 32
    germy says:

    @The Dangerman: The cat left the embassy some months ago. Placed in a shelter. Hopefully re-adopted and enjoying his/her new forever home and a regularly-scooped litter box.

    ReplyReply
  33. 33

    Yeah. So my post was along the lines of, ha ha ha ha ha, &c. But the site thinks it’s spam.

    ReplyReply
  34. 34
    germy says:

    The fact that they’re using CFAA against him is interesting. I wonder if they wanted to use espionage act charges but knew they were less likely to get an extradition because those come with potential death penalty. UK refuses to extradite where death penalty likely.— Xeni Jardin (@xeni) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  35. 35
    germy says:

    Man, says here they arrested Julian but those photos make it look like they got Captain Crunch by mistake— Xeni Jardin (@xeni) April 11, 2019

    The truth is that they were drunk with power and they had a neverending hardon to take down Hillary Clinton and that’s how this whole mess started. Say more later. May justice prevail.— Xeni Jardin (@xeni) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  36. 36
    L85NJGT says:

    Some pigs are more equal than others…..

    ReplyReply
  37. 37
    germy says:

    @biff murphy:

    Looks like he went willingly

    He didn’t look cooperative in the video. The police seem to be dragging him while he struggles.

    ReplyReply
  38. 38
    Kay says:

    @L85NJGT:

    It’s baffling how Wikileaks stopped all their brave, muckraking publishing the moment Donald Trump was elected.

    ReplyReply
  39. 39
    Immanentize says:

    @OzarkHillbilly:
    I’m pretty sure what they agreed to was that Assange would not face a death penalty in any state he is sent to. This is a pretty common requirement from EU countries and we always agree to not seek death.

    ReplyReply
  40. 40
    Joey Maloney says:

    @Immanentize: I sure hope the EU isn’t relying on Donald Trump’s word for that.

    ReplyReply
  41. 41
    Kay says:

    There’s even a middle ground – Wikileaks could be like the National Enquirer and Fox News. It’s not nearly as romantic but they could just be hacks, in which case they would have first amendment protections, but far fewer fans.

    ReplyReply
  42. 42
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @germy: He could have walked out with dignity, instead he chose this.

    ReplyReply
  43. 43
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Immanentize: Yep, time and time again.

    ReplyReply
  44. 44
    GregB says:

    Snowden and Greenwald appear to be in meltdown mode.

    Their complicity game is nearing its sell by date.

    Kay, right on the money.

    Also, Assange knowing how they got their emails from the DNC Wikileaks then pushing the Seth Rich murder conspiracy is degenerate.

    Times up.

    ReplyReply
  45. 45
    Miss Bianca says:

    It’s astonishing to me how much I cheer for this asshole to be black-holed forever. I blame the coarsening of our culture under Trump.// Which is something that smelly couch potato helped bring on. Suffer, Assange, you worthless putz, SUFFER!

    ReplyReply
  46. 46
    L85NJGT says:

    “These people don’t see that if you encourage totalitarian methods, the time may come when they will be used against you instead of for you.”
    ― George Orwell, Animal Farm

    ReplyReply
  47. 47
    Amir Khalid says:

    @The Moar You Know:
    I have neither love nor admiration for Julian Assange, but as tobie points out he is not facing capital charges in the US. And the rape charge was dropped long ago.
    That said, he is an unpleasant person whom Equador sheltered for far too long for no real reason. He manipulated fools and naifs like Ed Snowdon and Chelsea Manning into giving up national secrets for his own profit, and then left them out to dry. I reckon Assange deserves at least as much time in a US prison as she got.

    ReplyReply
  48. 48
    rikyrah says:

    Nope 😠😠 😠

    Kailani Koenig (@kailanikm) Tweeted:
    Eric Swalwell @ NABTU conf says if he’s POTUS he’ll “put together a blended cabinet of Republicans and Democrats. Republicans plural.” Notes he’s the son of 2 Republicans & goes on Fox News so his fam can see him on TV. & so he “can talk to the president directly.” https://t.co/UdGCInAOYq https://twitter.com/kailanikm/status/1116013162539757569?s=17

    ReplyReply
  49. 49
    Kay says:

    @GregB:

    Oh, Greenwald knows that there’s a difference between a passive “publisher” and what occurred in the Murdoch scandal.

    If he doesn’t he can read the indictment:

    “The indictment alleges that in March 2010, Assange engaged in a conspiracy with Chelsea Manning, a former intelligence analyst in the U.S. Army, to assist Manning in cracking a password stored on U.S. Department of Defense computers connected to the Secret Internet Protocol Network (SIPRNet), a U.S. government network used for classified documents and communications. Manning, who had access to the computers in connection with her duties as an intelligence analyst, was using the computers to download classified records to transmit to WikiLeaks. Cracking the password would have allowed Manning to log on to the computers under a username that did not belong to her. Such a deceptive measure would have made it more difficult for investigators to determine the source of the illegal disclosures.”

    They’re alleging that he’s not just a passive “publisher” of stolen information.

    ReplyReply
  50. 50
    germy says:

    Here's the extremely contentious interview I did with @NPR this morning on @MorningEdition about the Assange arrest, which became contentious at the start because NPR weirdly lied by introducing me as a "colleague of Julian Assange" – starts at 3:32 https://t.co/OKx9ifFqgp— Glenn Greenwald (@ggreenwald) April 11, 2019

    LOL

    ReplyReply
  51. 51
    Immanentize says:

    @Joey Maloney:
    They don’t have to rely on anyone’s word. It’s like a contract and falls under the Rule of Speciality. Which is more accurately a rule of particularity. A country cannot try a rendered person for any crume other than what the extraditing country agrees to.

    ReplyReply
  52. 52
    James E Powell says:

    @germy:

    Maybe NPR should have said co-conspirator?

    ReplyReply
  53. 53
    Immanentize says:

    @Miss Bianca:
    What you describe is the daily sin against charity the Trump era has foisted on me.

    ReplyReply
  54. 54
    Kay says:

    @GregB:

    I tend to think these people, Trump and Assange and the rest, are smaller and pettier than grand conspiracies.

    They act in narrow self interest. I think their fans fight that idea more than the grand conspiracy idea because that would just mean that their fans are stupid and got played. There was no noble, over-arching cause. Just a bunch of self-interested actors jostling for power. I actually think they’re all too selfish and egotistical to cooperate in any scheme to take over the world, which may be what saves us. There’s no honor among these thieves. There almost never is, in real life.

    ReplyReply
  55. 55
    germy says:

    @James E Powell:

    Maybe NPR should have said co-conspirator?

    GG sounds pissed at the beginning of the interview. “I am a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist!” he declares indignantly. “Not an ‘colleague’ of Assange!”

    ReplyReply
  56. 56
    different-church-lady says:

    Here’s why I don’t spend any time at Daily Kos anymore:

    You cannot be upset and outraged about Jamal Khashoggi, then be happy regarding Julian Assange. Journalists are being bullied, tortured, prosecuted, and killed all because they expose world leaders. I cannot say enough how bad this is.

    Because secret state-sponsored murder is the same as due process.

    Granted, most of the comments are different flavors of “Good, finally!”, but there’s still the ham-brains

    ReplyReply
  57. 57
    different-church-lady says:

    @germy: “I’M CHARLES FOSTER KANE!”

    ReplyReply
  58. 58
    Kay says:

    @germy:

    I’m just relieved he wasn’t silenced. It’s an outrage how no one invites him to appear except for Tucker Carlson. That’s a civil rights violation. We all have a duty to listen to him and promote his career.

    ReplyReply
  59. 59
    montanareddog says:

    Hats off to the bobbies. Now that is how you do a perp walk, by dragging his skanky ass out of the door into the van.

    ReplyReply
  60. 60
    different-church-lady says:

    @Amir Khalid:

    And the rape charge was dropped long ago.

    As I understand it, the charge still stands, but the Swedes allowed the extradition order to expire

    ReplyReply
  61. 61
    germy says:

    @Amir Khalid:

    And the rape charge was dropped long ago.

    At least one of the victims wants him charged again.

    ReplyReply
  62. 62
    different-church-lady says:

    @germy:

    GG: Here’s the extremely contentious interview I did with @NPR this morning…

    That man hasn’t had a moment of his entire life that wasn’t contentious.

    ReplyReply
  63. 63
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Immanentize: I’m not sure that would stop them: Pompeo flounders on why annexation is good for the Golan but not for Crimea

    Under intense questioning about why the Israeli annexation of the Golan Heights was good but the Russian seizure of Crimea was bad, the US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, told senators that there was an “international law doctrine” which would be explained to them later.

    It turned out there was no doctrine. The state department’s clarification of Pompeo’s remarks contained no reference to one, and experts on international law said that none exists.
    ……………………….
    “There is international law doctrine on this very point. We don’t have time to go through it today. But [I’m] happy to have a team go over and walk you through that element of international law,” Pompeo told a Senate appropriations subcommittee.

    Asked for clarification about the “doctrine” the state department issued a statement that made several arguments but no legal ones.

    ReplyReply
  64. 64
    Aleta says:

    @The Moar You Know: @Alain the site fixer: @geg6: Thank you. Fucking rapist.

    ReplyReply
  65. 65
    germy says:

    @Kay: He is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist. (as he has told us again and again)

    ReplyReply
  66. 66
    Kay says:

    @different-church-lady:

    They don’t know if Assange works with one world leader against another. I don’t know either, but it’s certainly within the realm of the possible and screaming over and over that he’s a publisher doesn’t answer that question at all. “Publisher” doesn’t exclude all the others “ands”. He can be a publisher and a conspirator. He can be a publisher and….a lot of things.

    In fact, he could pick a side (politically) and still have first amendment protections. Then he’s just an ordinary partisan actor, like the rest of the far Right outlets here and abroad. But we’re forbidden to even contemplate these possibilities. We must scream “publisher!” and not think past that at all.

    ReplyReply
  67. 67
    germy says:

    @different-church-lady:

    “I’M CHARLES FOSTER KANE!”

    “I am Elmer J. Fudd, millionaire. I own a mansion and a yacht.”

    ReplyReply
  68. 68
    danielx says:

    Assange looks like Howard Hughes in his dotage.

    ReplyReply
  69. 69
    chopper says:

    lie down with dogs, etc etc.

    ReplyReply
  70. 70
    Timurid says:

    @germy:

    He also has a mansion and a yacht.

    ReplyReply
  71. 71
    Kay says:

    @germy:

    I don’t think Glenn Greenwald has a constitutional right to sell books or media appearances, whether he calls himself a lawyer or a journalist.

    ReplyReply
  72. 72
    germy says:

    @Kay: I agree. But he has a fierce sense of entitlement. Even more than my cat, who has no Pulitzer.

    ReplyReply
  73. 73
    West of the Rockies says:

    @germy:

    There are, what, probably thousands of Pulitzer-winning writers walking the earth. Hopefully, GG is sharting his britches in dread as to what this might mean for him.

    Somewhere, also, Pam Anderson has fainted.

    ReplyReply
  74. 74
    brendancalling says:

    I love how he’s wagging his finger like an angry old man (he’s a year younger than me, for the record). I’m assuming the police had to listen to him rant on and on while they carted him out to the truck.

    ReplyReply
  75. 75
    Vhh says:

    @Kay: Natl Enquirer is for sale. The two leading prospects just have to be Fox and Jeff Bezos.

    ReplyReply
  76. 76
    TomatoQueen says:

    Chortle. Chuckle. Crunching on weaponized popcorn for brekky.

    ReplyReply
  77. 77
    Barbara says:

    @germy: The law surrounding publishers who use purloined materials is still pretty murky in the U.S. The issue should be whether Assange engaged in criminal activity or whether he merely published the fruits of crimes he was not otherwise connected with. Basically, being a journalist doesn’t eliminate whatever duty you have to not commit crimes or even to cooperate as a witness to a crime. Let’s say you are a journalists who witnesses a horrific crime. You can report on it and still be required (within other permissible limits) to give testimony. Assange might be a witness, but he also might have committed or conspired to commit a crime. The fact that the results of that crime were published doesn’t undo the crime that was perpetrated to get them. When the NYT published the so-called Pentagon Papers, there was never any suggestion that it paid Daniel Ellsberg for the materials or that it conspired with him to steal them. The protections that exist for journalistic privilege are case by case, and tend to come down to whether the government is trying to rely on journalist materials as a shortcut to its own investigation, which tends not to be permitted. Happy to give you some case cites if this really interests you.

    ReplyReply
  78. 78
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @germy: Saying to your cat that, “You’re no GG…” is pretty faint praise.

    ReplyReply
  79. 79
    germy says:

    @Vhh: Maybe Sinclair can buy it.

    ReplyReply
  80. 80
    different-church-lady says:

    @Kay: It’d be interesting to find out how these folks feel if their credit card numbers and bank accounts were to be “published”.

    ReplyReply
  81. 81
    chris says:

    Couple of things noted on twitter.

    Wikileaks published the private emails of the president of Ecuador and his wife. Doh!

    Loopy wingnut Cassandra Fairbanks was outside the embassy. Presumably with a posse.

    Bye, Julian.

    ReplyReply
  82. 82
    Barbara says:

    @chris: Like I said in a comment a couple of weeks back, the philosophical underpinning of most professional bad boys seems to be taking “you’re not the boss of me” as an existential principle to live by, to the point of self-destruction and mental illness.

    ReplyReply
  83. 83
    L85NJGT says:

    @danielx:

    Seven years of relentless masturbation to the JFK Mr. X scene on auto play will do that.

    ReplyReply
  84. 84
    Cheap Jim says:

    @germy: He won the Pulitzer. So what? Harvey won the Pulitzer too.

    ReplyReply
  85. 85
    waspuppet says:

    @Betty Cracker: Trump? Consistency? HA! “How good have you made me feel about myself in the past three hours or so, and what should I do about you that will make me think I look good for the next few hours?”

    Thanks for the update.

    ReplyReply
  86. 86

    @clay:

    Also, it’s hard to see how ” not letting someone get away with (alleged) sexual assault” = “threat to freedom of press”.

    You can make a serious and convincing argument that the only reason he’s been pursued as vigorously as he has is because of his publishing business, and the other things he’s being accused of are just a pretext to punish somebody whose writing they don’t like. That would indeed be a threat to freedom of expression. Of course the flip side is that he never would have been granted asylum for 7 years if not for his publishing, so an ordinary rapist never would have taken so long to catch and extradite.

    ReplyReply
  87. 87
    Kay says:

    @germy:

    The “journalist” definition they (now) rely on comes with rules. Obviously they’re not formal and enforceable rules but they matter in a prosecution in the US because of first amendment protections. So if Assange wants that shelter he’ll have to make a showing that he complied with journalistic conventions on what constitutes a passive role as a publisher of stolen information and what doesn’t. They don’t want to have that discussion, but that’s the issue. We all agree that publishers are entitled to protections. The question is can the federal government take him out from under those protections and prove he conspired and acted in concert in the theft. Announcing “I’m a publisher!” is his defense. The inquiry doesn’t stop there, just with an assertion because if it does then there are no rules at all and a publisher can conspire and steal and do anything at all. “Publishing” isn’t an all purpose cleanse that scrubs the prior acts.

    ReplyReply
  88. 88
    different-church-lady says:

    Here’s why I ought to still hang around Daily Kos:

    I realize there’s no humor in this, but damn . if you slap a red cone hat on this fella, you have a garden gnome.

    ReplyReply
  89. 89
    rikyrah says:

    Today we learned:

    Barr still won’t commit to giving Congress the full unredacted Mueller report,

    Barr won’t request court approval to give us grand jury material, and

    Barr won’t even say if the White House has seen, or been briefed on, the report.

    Trump got his Roy Cohn. https://t.co/8eljMjgEeN

    — Adam Schiff (@RepAdamSchiff) April 9, 2019

    ReplyReply
  90. 90
    Kraux Pas says:

    @tobie:

    I don’t think I will ever understand why ‘transparency advocates’ have such fondness for opaque, right-wing regimes.

    It gives them something to oppose. If your whole identity is forged around opposition to the state, better to have an oppressive government instituting these policies that you get famous for undermining.

    That’s also why they go harder against reformers who “don’t do enough” to pull back repressive policies once instituted. This hampers actual reform, increases the likelihood of power going back to the authoritarians, and ensures a lifetime of notoriety for brave information freedom warriors.

    ReplyReply
  91. 91
    Aleta says:

    @Amir Khalid: Did the statute of limit.s run out? Or, was it dropped because they could not access him? These are two things I read, and I don’t know the actual reason. It’s been said that he hid out to get beyond when the charge would be prosecutable. Don’t know. But the fact that it was dropped doesn’t mean much w/o the context. I know: he wasn’t convicted of it.

    ReplyReply
  92. 92
    different-church-lady says:

    @tobie:

    I don’t think I will ever understand why ‘transparency advocates’ have such fondness for opaque, right-wing regimes.

    Because they’re completely disingenuous?

    ReplyReply
  93. 93
    danielx says:

    @L85NJGT:

    I could have happily lived the rest of my life without that image.

    ReplyReply
  94. 94
    Betty Cracker says:

    @Kay: I agree with every word of that. Their activities as well as their motivations are petty and self-interested. And now at least one of them may end up scorched by the fire he started so cavalierly.

    ReplyReply
  95. 95
    Kay says:

    @different-church-lady:

    It’d be interesting to find out how these folks feel if their credit card numbers and bank accounts were to be “published”.

    Right. The act of “publishing” doesn’t trigger the protection. It’s not an after the fact immunity shield. I think they know this (some of them) but it’s beneficial to them to pretend it does and the rest just aren’t thinking at all.

    ReplyReply
  96. 96
    Baud says:

    @Kay:

    It’s baffling how Wikileaks stopped all their brave, muckraking publishing the moment Donald Trump was elected.

    Information wants to be fascist.

    ReplyReply
  97. 97
  98. 98
    Gin & Tonic says:

    @Vhh: Man, I would love, love, love for Bezos to buy it, shut it down and fire everybody.

    ReplyReply
  99. 99
    germy says:

    Meanwhile…

    jfc this is absurd! NYT buried the story of Trump's sister quitting the federal bench under allegations that she and her brother, THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, were involved in an illegal tax scheme to boost their own wealth.
    Who is making the decisions over there? https://t.co/sRXrA6vHKl
    — Matt Ortega (@MattOrtega) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  100. 100
    laura says:

    @germy: I’m convinced that he was wearing Kleenex boxes for shoes when they dragged his ass out and shoved him in the van.

    ReplyReply
  101. 101
    Kay says:

    @Betty Cracker:

    Brexit is to me the perfect example. They’re all acting for their own reasons. They’re the worst fucking “conspiracy” in the history of the world. They can’t even get ten of the soldiers to pull in the same direction. Everyone is a leader. There are no followers.

    ReplyReply
  102. 102
    germy says:

    Elizabeth Warren has rolled out a proposal to levy a 7% tax on corporate profits above $100 million, "no loopholes or exemptions," which if enacted would raise an estimated $1 trillion from the country's wealthiest businesses. https://t.co/IXcYCpcrnW— Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  103. 103
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Baud: Now that their hero has been renditi…I mean, arrested, “Release the Hackers!”

    ReplyReply
  104. 104

    @GregB:

    Their complicity game is nearing its sell by date.

    It will be interesting to see if Assange flips on his co-conspirators. Things could get messy for the whole gang if he does.

    ReplyReply
  105. 105
    germy says:

    Editor-in-Chief of Wikileaks Kristinn Hrafnsson says Julian Assange has been the victim of an “extensive spying operation” in the Ecuadorean Embassy, with cameras recording his every move and meeting. They believe the material has been handed to the Trump administration @LBC— Rachael Venables (@rachaelvenables) April 10, 2019

    One of the first question from journalists to Julian Assange's team
    "Isn’t it a bit ironic that you’re complaining about leaks?"https://t.co/pQX5hlp1iP— Rachael Venables (@rachaelvenables) April 10, 2019

    ReplyReply
  106. 106
    Just One More Canuck says:

    @germy: @different-church-lady: “I’m INVINCIBLE!!”

    “You’re a loony.”

    ReplyReply
  107. 107
    Ruckus says:

    @Kay:

    We must scream “publisher!” and not think past that at all.

    Sounds like the Bundys and their claim about sheriffs being the ultimate law officers or that the federal government can’t own land so they can do as they please.

    ReplyReply
  108. 108
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Just One More Canuck: Dammit, can’t name that movie!

    ETA Doh! Holy Grail. It sucks getting old.

    ReplyReply
  109. 109
    StringOnAStick says:

    My ex-friend the One True Lefty who proves the horseshoe theory of politics and then became a MRA, was convinced from the very beginning that the rape charges against this prick was a honeytrap and no one as pure thinking as St. Julian could have done such a thing. This was before Me Too made “believe women” a cultural statement but it pissed me off when he tried to push that point. He’s a big GG fan too.

    ReplyReply
  110. 110
    Don Beal says:

    Always kind of wondered if this blog could truly be labeled progressive. I think I have my answer.

    ReplyReply
  111. 111
    different-church-lady says:

    @L85NJGT:

    “These people don’t see that if you encourage totalitarian methods, the time may will come when they will be used against you instead of for you.”

    ReplyReply
  112. 112
    germy says:

    I remember when Sean Hannity told Julian he was welcome to host his show any time.

    ReplyReply
  113. 113
    different-church-lady says:

    @Don Beal: Show your cards, Don.

    ReplyReply
  114. 114
    tobie says:

    @germy: Strange timing! I saw the news of Warren’s corporate tax proposal and at the same time as Max Boot posted an interview with Jerry Brown who advises candidates not to be visionary but not to get into legislative weeds. Beats me who is right.

    His big advice is to think big — but not get too specific. Recalling Gary Hart’s primary loss in 1984, he said, “You need just enough beef, but not too much to choke on it.” He says the Democrats should promise better health care, infrastructure and education, cleaner energy and even space exploration. “You need the romance, you need the dream.” That’s why, as governor, he championed a costly high-speed train between San Francisco and Los Angeles. (His successor, Gov. Gavin Newsom, downsized the dream.) But he argues it’s a mistake to lay out specific programs “that have trillion-dollar budget implications when you’re not in a position to make those kind of decisions. That’s jacking everybody up for a big letdown.”

    ReplyReply
  115. 115
    Kay says:

    @germy:

    I think she has problems with getting elected and those showed (even) in Massachusetts, which is a legit concern and criticism, but I may have to support her because I cannot think of a candidate in my adult lifetime who has been closer to me on nearly every issue. I may never get this again :)

    I think she completely understands executive and administrative power, too, so we would get a LOT even without the Senate. I think Clinton understood it too and it’s undervalued as a an attribute. Clinton with her “levers of power” – clunky and easily demonized but also true. They have to know how to use that, without Congress.

    ReplyReply
  116. 116
    Immanentize says:

    @Kay:

    They don’t know if Assange works with one world leader against another.

    Oh, I bet they do.

    ReplyReply
  117. 117
    germy says:

    Trump confessed his love for Wikileaks almost daily in the run-up to the election, and Assange corresponded fondly with Trump Jr.

    ReplyReply
  118. 118
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Kay:

    I think she has problems with getting elected and those showed (even) in Massachusetts, which is a legit concern and criticism, but I may have to support her because I cannot think of a candidate in my adult lifetime who has been closer to me on nearly every issue. I may never get this again :)

    Same here. There is a part of me that wants to vote for her in the primary even *if* I don’t think she could win.

    **haven’t decided yet, tho I lean in the direction of “no”.

    ETA: but either way I can send her money.

    ReplyReply
  119. 119
    different-church-lady says:

    As it slowly sinks in that this arrest was based on indictments from March 2018, the vectors on the outrage bank-shots are going to get very very complicated for some on-line addicts.

    ReplyReply
  120. 120
    Betty Cracker says:

    @Don Beal: Depends on how you define “progressive.” Reflexive support for an accused rapist who worked with a hostile foreign power led by a murderous oligarch to put a racist, sexist, xenophobic demagogue in charge of the world’s most fearsome nuclear arsenal doesn’t fit my definition of “progressive.” Your mileage may vary.

    ReplyReply
  121. 121
    Immanentize says:

    @Aleta: He was actually never charged in Sweden. The exrtradition request was from an investigating magistrate — pre-indictment. Frankly, any questioning could have happened anywhere. including the UK. It was a weird use of an extradition warrant and, as much as I think the guy should go to jail, Sweden was not in a strong position to demand his extradition to talk to him about a possible charge.

    So, not only no conviction, there never was a charge. Just the facts.

    ReplyReply
  122. 122
    different-church-lady says:

    @Betty Cracker:

    Reflexive support… [snip] …doesn’t fit my definition of “progressive.”

    That’s probably why we’re losing our accreditation.

    ReplyReply
  123. 123
    Kay says:

    @Immanentize:

    I genuinely don’t know if they do. They make so many assumptions, because they see everything thru the lens of the evil United States. I don’t know why Ecuador acted. Maybe Ecuador has their own reasons. It certainly seems patronizing and horrible to assume Ecuador had “the right” reasons for sheltering him and now has “the wrong” reasons for turning him over. Who decides what’s in their best interest? Not me. I’m amused that they’re a “sovereign nation” as long as they hew to US Lefties preferences and a corrupted, coerced actor the moment they don’t.

    ReplyReply
  124. 124
    Miss Bianca says:

    Meanwhile, in pet-related news…

    Roxy the Wolf-Girl decided, spontaneously, to come in the house last night. This is a Biden-sized BFD, y’all. And the funniest thing – because we had a spring blizzard last night, the kind of thing that a month ago she was shrugging off her coat as she burrowed in a snow drift – was that every time she thought she wanted to go back out, she’d get a snootful of snow in the face, say “eff this”, and opt to come back in.

    Ah, the lure of the Great Indoors! : )

    She is a much more decorative couch surfer than the Silver Slug that just got evicted from the Embassy, let me assure you!

    ReplyReply
  125. 125
    Gin & Tonic says:

    Bad day for the “A”s – Avenatti indicted on a shitload of charges, including embezzlement, perjury, etc.

    Here’s hoping against hope that Barr has a bad day tomorrow.

    ReplyReply
  126. 126
    plato says:

    Good. Fuck the ratfucker. Good news of the day.

    ReplyReply
  127. 127
    Miss Bianca says:

    @Don Beal:

    Always kind of wondered if this blog could truly be labeled progressive. I think I have my answer.

    The world waits breathlessly for your verdict, Don. I think I may have to have another cup of coffee – the suspense is wearing me down. *yawn*

    ReplyReply
  128. 128
    Gin & Tonic says:

    @Miss Bianca: I tip my hat to you.

    ReplyReply
  129. 129
    Kay says:

    @OzarkHillbilly:

    I wonder if it might come down to kumbaya and positivity because people are just fucking exhausted and sad. If so it’s Booker and Biden in that lane. Harris is also sort of cheerful and resilient but in a more oppositional way- I think it’s a strength for her- it’s hard to be both furious and optimistic and she has the potential to pull that off.

    ReplyReply
  130. 130
    rikyrah says:

    These muthaphuckas here 😠😠😠

    🇹🇹Black🇭🇹Aziz🇳🇬aNANsi🇯🇲 (@Freeyourmindkid) Tweeted:
    So Texas is trying to prevent 3 or more people who need assistance when voting at the polls from rising in the same vehicle (ie a good portion of the elderly who will carpool from church to the polls). Pay attention y’all, this is the shit that will keep Republicans in power. https://t.co/FyYz41qnMU https://twitter.com/Freeyourmindkid/status/1116308762413998080?s=17

    ReplyReply
  131. 131
    low-tech cyclist says:

    @Alain the site fixer:

    Also, I’d love to see Snowden on trial for treason, espionage, and a host of other things. He’s not a hero, rather a stooge or, more likely, a villain.

    Yeah, damn his hide for spilling the beans on how Dick Cheney was spying on you, me, and everyone else!

    ReplyReply
  132. 132
    Kraux Pas says:

    @Kay:

    I think she has problems with getting elected and those showed (even) in Massachusetts

    That was her first election vs an incumbent. She won reelection with something like 2/3 of the vote.

    ReplyReply
  133. 133
    rikyrah says:

    @Kay:

    I think she has problems with getting elected and those showed (even) in Massachusetts, which is a legit concern and criticism, but I may have to support her because I cannot think of a candidate in my adult lifetime who has been closer to me on nearly every issue. I may never get this again :)

    That’s why we have primaries Kay. You can follow your heart.

    ReplyReply
  134. 134
    Aleta says:

    For my understanding, I looked up a BBC article about
    Sweden dropping its rape investigation of Assange.

    (May 2017) Top prosecutor Marianne Ny said his arrest warrant was being revoked as it was impossible to serve him notice.

    Mr Assange’s Swedish lawyer, Per Samuelson, said the prosecutor’s decision on Friday represented “a total victory” for his client.

    But the Wikileaks founder responded angrily in a tweet: “Detained for 7 years without charge… while my children grew up and my name was slandered. I do not forgive or forget.”

    The plaintiff in the rape case was “shocked” by the decision, her lawyer said, and maintained her accusations against Mr Assange, Agence France-Presse reported.

    The decision coincided with the release by Wikileaks of another tranche of documents about the CIA’s technical capabilities.

    At a press briefing on Friday, Ms Ny said that by remaining in the embassy in London Mr Assange had evaded the exercise of the European Arrest Warrant (EAW) that would have seen him extradited to Sweden.

    She said that under Swedish law a criminal investigation needed to be conducted “as quickly as possible”. Sweden did not expect Ecuador’s co-operation in formally notifying Mr Assange of the allegations against him, a necessary step in proceeding with the case, she added.

    But she said: “If he were to return to Sweden before the statute of limitation on this case expires in August 2020, the preliminary investigation could be resumed.”

    She said it was “regrettable we have not been able to carry out the investigation”, and added: “We are not making any pronouncement about guilt.”

    ReplyReply
  135. 135
    Kay says:

    Paul Rosenzweig

    @RosenzweigP
    2h2 hours ago
    More Paul Rosenzweig Retweeted U.S. Attorney EDVA
    This is computer fraud, plain and simple. No espionage charge; no charge for publication. Journalists who rob and steal are not cloaked in jouralistic privileges

    So the Assange defenders could defend on that. But they can’t just make a blanket assertion that he gets the protection and leave it there. That’s not good enough.

    ReplyReply
  136. 136
    Barbara says:

    @germy:

    Editor-in-Chief of Wikileaks Kristinn Hrafnsson says Julian Assange has been the victim of an “extensive spying operation” in the Ecuadorean Embassy, with cameras recording his every move and meeting. They believe the material has been handed to the Trump administration

    He is living IN THE EMBASSY. What did they think would happen? International Law 101: An embassy is technically part of the territory of the nation that maintains it. People inside the Ecuador embassy don’t have EU data right or privacy protections, they are bound by and have the rights that people resident in Ecuador do.

    ReplyReply
  137. 137
    plato says:

    @Kay: “Electability”? Et tu?

    ReplyReply
  138. 138
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    @Kay: Booker’s unending cheeriness just feels,,, forced, contrived. That is not necessarily fair to him, I think it comes from my own inherent curmudgeonliness. I far prefer Harris. My mind can be changed at this point tho.

    ReplyReply
  139. 139
    Gravenstone says:

    @germy: Would “acolyte” be a more apt description, Glenn? Asking for a friend…

    ReplyReply
  140. 140
    germy says:

    This isn’t journalism:

    Reminder: WikiLeaks, fully knowing murdered DNC staffer Seth Rich did not give them hacked documents, repeatedly dogwhistled a conspiracy that he did—as Rich's family begged people to stop.
    Here's WikiLeaks' tweet about Rod Wheeler, a "source" in Fox News' false Seth Rich story. pic.twitter.com/Wxe8KYxjyG— Ben Collins (@oneunderscore__) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  141. 141
    West of the Rockies says:

    Trying to watch the Assange news on MSNBC, but Craig Melvin has that Sherrod Brown thing going on. I keep clearing my throat in an effort to make him clear the frogs and gravel from his.

    Yes, Assange looks like hell. He looks like he gave up personal hygiene worries about 7 years ago.

    ReplyReply
  142. 142
    germy says:

    This isn’t journalism:

    Wikileaks also claimed Hillary Clinton was taking "wake up pills" as she had recently read an article in her hacked emails about "decision fatigue." "Decision fatigue" is not a disease; it's a marketing term for too many choices at the supermarket.https://t.co/1mfxR6aDjC— Ben Collins (@oneunderscore__) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  143. 143
    Aleta says:

    @Immanentize: Thanks for that. An important distinction.

    ReplyReply
  144. 144
    Plato says:

    @germy:

    He just brought me coffee.

    ReplyReply
  145. 145
    germy says:

    Five days before the 2016 election, Wikileaks linked to a "significant" development: A Reddit post on the virulently racist and conspiratorial subreddit r/The_Donald by a now-deleted user, claiming Hillary Clinton was involved in trafficking children.https://t.co/s4Z6KzREIe— Ben Collins (@oneunderscore__) April 11, 2019

    Two days before the election, Sean Hannity and Drudge cited WikiLeaks in claiming that Hillary Clinton was a literal Satanist.Driven in part by two Wikileaks tweets with 20k total retweets, "Spirit Cooking" trended on Twitter 48 hours before polls openedhttps://t.co/9qL6eaOYNl— Ben Collins (@oneunderscore__) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  146. 146
    Peale says:

    @rikyrah: So on days the polls are open, police get to pull over cars with 3 or more black people on the cause of activity suspiciously like going to vote? Because you know they aren’t pulling over vans of white elderly people.

    ReplyReply
  147. 147
    Aleta says:

    @germy: yikes. Equating decision fatigue with drug use? They fight for freedumb.
    (Seriously, that’s incredibly corrupt.)

    ReplyReply
  148. 148
    germy says:

    Sean Hannity has deleted a bunch of his old tweets about Julian. The one offering him a hosting gig on his show, a few other supportive tweets. People are mocking him; calling him “Client #3” as one does.

    ReplyReply
  149. 149
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @OzarkHillbilly: @Kay: Booker’s unending cheeriness just feels,,, forced, contrived.

    Yup, there’s something very studied about his public persona. I’ve said before, Booker reminds me of Letterman’s observation about Jay Leno: It’s great that he happened by in his Stanley Steamer to help the old couple change their flat tire, but how did the photographers find out about it?
    and I’ll never forget his sweaty audition to be the new Lieberman on MTP in 2012, declaring that the Obama campaign made him sick by picking on poor Mitt Romney and his noble history as a venture capitalist.

    ReplyReply
  150. 150
    L85NJGT says:

    @different-church-lady:

    no true progressive….

    ReplyReply
  151. 151
    matt says:

    I’ll totally donate a share of his cost of having a court appointed attorney.

    ReplyReply
  152. 152
    Gelfling 545 says:

    @OzarkHillbilly: Besides, the cat could have a Pulitzer if he wanted.

    ReplyReply
  153. 153
    Kraux Pas says:

    @Aleta:

    yikes. Equating decision fatigue with drug use? They fight for freedumb.

    Too many choices at the supermarket getting you down? Ask your doctor about new Selectiva (Seletoxetine)

    ReplyReply
  154. 154
    tobie says:

    @Jim, Foolish Literalist: I like Booker. I also like Beto. I don’t think Democrats can out-anger Republicans, so it becomes this weird delicate balancing act where you have to point out the outrageous abuses of power and outrageous concentrations of wealth while still being hopeful about the future. That’s a tough needle to thread.

    ReplyReply
  155. 155
    Aleta says:

    (Guardian) Another Assange supporter, who witnessed the arrest, said: … “He hasn’t seen daylight in over six years so to bring him out into bright sunshine was really cruel. We feared this would happen over the weekend, probably in the middle of the night, so this is truly shocking.”

    An arrest warrant was issued for Assange in 2010 for two separate allegations – one of rape and one of molestation – after he visited Sweden for a speaking trip. He launched a legal battle against extradition to Sweden but when that failed entered the Ecuadorian embassy in Hans Crescent and requested political asylum.

    Elisabeth Massi Fritz, a lawyer for one of the two women who accused Assange, welcomed the arrest. “My client and I have just received the news that Assange has been arrested. That what we have been waiting and hoping for, for almost seven years, has now happened is clearly a shock to my client. We will do everything we can to ensure that the prosectors resume the Swedish preliminary investigation so that Assange can be extradited to Sweden and prosecuted for rape.”

    (Can’t say if it will happen. And S. of L. runs out in 2020.)

    ReplyReply
  156. 156
    different-church-lady says:

    @Aleta:

    “He hasn’t seen daylight in over six years…

    Apparently the Ecuadorian Embassy has a balcony, but no windows.

    ReplyReply
  157. 157
    Peale says:

    @Kraux Pas: Selectiva is a powerful laxative, forcing you to make your decisions quickly before fatigue can set in. Bonus is it limits the number of things you need at the moment, reducing the number of extraneous decisions that bog down most shoppers.

    ReplyReply
  158. 158
    Kay says:

    @plato:

    I know, but I don’t want the whole sexism conversation to act to exclude any concerns. Even if I say it’s sexism, it’s not her fault but it is her problem. We have to deal with this. We can’t wish it away. I’m not going to feel any better if she’s the nominee and she loses on account of sexism as opposed to something that is in her control. She still loses.

    ReplyReply
  159. 159
    rikyrah says:

    @Peale:

    @rikyrah: So on days the polls are open, police get to pull over cars with 3 or more black people on the cause of activity suspiciously like going to vote? Because you know they aren’t pulling over vans of white elderly people.

    Who you telling?

    ReplyReply
  160. 160
    rikyrah says:

    @germy:

    Like someone hasn’t already captured the screenshots…..

    ReplyReply
  161. 161
    L85NJGT says:

    @Kraux Pas:

    Side effects include explosive orange diarrhea.

    ReplyReply
  162. 162
    plato says:

    Hillary Clinton knew exactly what Julian was up to a long time ago and it’s a big part of why he and Putin ended up having so many interests and special friends in common. America ignored and disparaged Hillary Clinton at its own peril.— Xeni Jardin (@xeni) April 11, 2019

    ReplyReply
  163. 163
    Joey Maloney says:

    @Immanentize: Right. Just like the IRS shall provide any tax return requested to the Chair of House Ways & Means. Just like anyone facing a credible threat of persecution shall be granted asylum. Just like any Special Counsel’s report shall be released.

    Shall I go on? If Trump wants to greet Assange’s plane and give him a double-tap right there on the tarmac, what’s going to stop him?

    ReplyReply
  164. 164
    Reformed Panty Sniffer says:

    @Anya: Indeed. Other reports from the Ecuadorian media are that he smeared feces on the wall. Seriously, he looks like late-stage Howard Hughes, without the money. Also, let us not forget that Assange has been accused of neglecting his cat overlord, which is the worst crime.

    ReplyReply
  165. 165
    rikyrah says:

    Amene (@Ange_Amene) Tweeted:
    And folks can keep pretending Kamala is going to have a problem with black voters over some truancy issues, but they are gonna have to come harder than that.

    Seriously.

    Folks often forget Black voters wanted the 94 Crime Bill. It’s the new gen that has issues with it. https://twitter.com/Ange_Amene/status/1116169885141233664?s=17

    ReplyReply
  166. 166
    mattH says:

    Speaking only for myself, fuck that guy. He’s reaping what he sowed. I’ll reserve my efforts for Trump victims who didn’t help put a racist, sexist, xenophobic demagogue in charge of my country.

    I couldn’t agree more. Thanks 😊

    ReplyReply
  167. 167
    cokane says:

    Don’t forget that Assange communicated privately with Don Jr during the campaign, asking for an ambassadorship during the Trump administration. The exact kind of corrupt quid-pro-quo relationship transparency organizations like Wikileaks says they are trying to expose.

    ReplyReply
  168. 168
    TomatoQueen says:

    @Miss Bianca: This is wonderful news. Huzzah for Roxy!

    ReplyReply
  169. 169
    mad citizen says:

    @OzarkHillbilly: Dead thread maybe, and no one commented on this Pompeo BS, but I found it interesting. They are ALL bulls hitters. So glad the adults are running the Exec. Branch.

    ReplyReply
  170. 170
  171. 171
    Montanareddog says:

    I still don’t understand why the Trotters’ Uncle Albert was living in the Ecuadorean Embassy

    https://images.app.goo.gl/WRkiagQQ5mB7pnCB7

    ReplyReply
  172. 172
    Immanentize says:

    @Aleta: Absenting yourself in order to avoid justice is, in many countries, basis for tolling the statute of limitations.

    ReplyReply
  173. 173
    Immanentize says:

    @Joey Maloney: The federal judge hearing the case/

    ReplyReply
  174. 174
    lahke says:

    @OzarkHillbilly: Sorry if I’m repeating something stated above, but I’m at work and don’t have the bandwidth to read all the comments. I watched the video of the Ecuadoran president’s announcement, and he says that he stipulated to the UK that Assange would not be sent to any country that tortures people or that has the death penalty. So that rules the US out twice.

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  175. 175
    Kay says:

    Howard Schultz
    ‏Verified account
    @HowardSchultz
    Follow Follow @HowardSchultz
    More
    The Medicare for All proposal by @BernieSanders would cause 180 million people to lose their current healthcare coverage. All that Sanders and the far-left care about is furthering their agenda. This is unrealistic and shows a total disregard of our country’s overwhelming debt.

    Our national scold and naysayer. Who do our billionaires suck so bad? One would think they would be optimistic, positive people but they’re all grim, joyless people who go out of their way to tamp down any idea.

    Why aren’t they happier? Is this any way to sell over-priced coffee, let alone lead the nation?

    “GIVE UP. That WON’T work – don’t even ASK for health care- you’re not getting it”.

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  176. 176
    Kay says:

    I was never a Starbucks hater- I love coffee very much and I think it’s fine although I also like Dunkin Donuts and McDonalds coffee, so I’m obviously not picky. But now I have this while negative association with the place based solely on the efforts of the founder. I don’t think I’d go in there. I don’t want to think about him in that context. It’s overly complicated for my coffee purposes.

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  177. 177
    different-church-lady says:

    @cokane:

    The exact kind of corrupt quid-pro-quo relationship transparency organizations like Wikileaks says they are trying to expose.

    *ZOT!* It just hit me: we’re not dealing with the “progressive” left or the “on-line” left — what we’ve got here is the gullible left.

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  178. 178
    dww44 says:

    @rikyrah: Actually, I was pleasantly impressed with Swalwell’s appearance last evening on Rachel’s show. I noted the nods he made to the GOP, but given his background, I understand why he does that. But, I also note he was unequivocal about calling out Trump and his apparent allegiance, via publicly available video, to Russia. Said that Trump seems to be compromised. In a period where we are all being told ( including Rachel herself) to give up on the Russia story and put it behind us, I’m glad that he’s not. None of us should be.

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  179. 179
    Miss Bianca says:

    @Kay: Is anybody asking this jackass what he proposes for health care beyond “become a billionaire just like me”?

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  180. 180
    J R in WV says:

    @rikyrah:

    …Eric Swalwell @ NABTU conf says if he’s POTUS he’ll “put together a blended cabinet of Republicans and Democrats. Republicans plural.”

    Yeah, nope. Unacceptable deuch bag. My parents were both Republicans, and for the last several years of her life my mom confessed on her death bed that she had been cancelling my dad’s Republican vote for years. She couldn’t go with their anti-abortion work at all.

    I utterly reject my parents’ Republicanism, and I do not see why Swalwell can’t do that as well. If he hasn’t learned by now that you can’t trust a Republican to uphold their oath to support and defend the Constitution, you can’t trust them not to shiv you in the back at their first opportunity.

    Nope, DisQualified totally!!!

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  181. 181
    Immanentize says:

    @lahke: Here is a place where I don’t know if Ecuador, or Assange, would have any way to complain if he were ultimately transferred to the US. Of course, the UK could send him to Sweden, and Sweden could send him to the U.S.

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  182. 182
    Immanentize says:

    @Kay: That is such a weird argument — healthcare for everyone will mean you will lose your health care? But Obama fell for it too — “if you like the health care you currently have, you can keep it” was for some reason a very important part of the pitch.

    I’m not sure that these billionaires are so unhappy themselves, they just don’t want others to be happy. As if Happiness is something they bought and is a rare commodity.

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  183. 183
    rikyrah says:

    @Kay:

    We just added 1.5 TRILLION BECAUSE OF THAT PHUCKING TAX CUT, COFFEE MAN.

    But, you don’t wanna talk about THAT.

    Phuck outta here.

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  184. 184
    Manxome Bromide says:

    @different-church-lady: Wait a minute. Weren’t we told there weren’t any sealed indictments left?

    What loophole is this sneaking through?

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  185. 185

    “I never thought leopards would eat my face,” sobs rapist who helped to elect the Leopards Eating People’s Faces Party.

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  186. 186
    sgrAstar says:

    @Miss Bianca: love the stories of your Wolf-Girl Roxy! Keep em coming.

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  187. 187
    laura says:

    @rikyrah: Bring on the confiscatory tax rates to wring the idle capital out of the soft palms of the billionaire class and put it to some social good.
    Low tumbrel number for the burnt cafe king.

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  188. 188
    Immanentize says:

    @sgrAstar: We were talking about you yesterday, black hole pics and all….

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  189. 189
    tobie says:

    @Immanentize: I’m not going to defend Schultz who seems like a monumental ass, but I think (a) he’s giving us a preview of what every Republican will say in the fall and (b) the issue of the transition to a single payer system is important. That’s why — with the exception of Wilmer — just about every Democratic candidate is offering an option to buy into a public system, be it Medicare, Medicaid or the public option, as a first step and then either explicitly proposing a closing down of private insurance plans or implicitly hoping private insurance will collapse when one sees how much better the public systems are.

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  190. 190
    Steve in the ATL says:

    @Betty Cracker:

    Depends on how you define “progressive.” Reflexive support for an accused rapist who worked with a hostile foreign power led by a murderous oligarch to put a racist, sexist, xenophobic demagogue in charge of the world’s most fearsome nuclear arsenal doesn’t fit my definition of “progressive.” Your mileage may vary.

    OMG this is perfect

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  191. 191
    matt says:

    @different-church-lady: Reminds me of that dril tweet about good things and bad things.

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  192. 192
    rikyrah says:

    @Steve in the ATL:

    it really is the perfect comeback

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  193. 193
    Don Beal says:

    I would pause before I backed Pence buddy Moreno of Ecuador for turning Assange out of the embassy. The leftist Correa’ has condemned it. Regardless of your opinion of Assange, caving to the wishes of those who repress press freedom is not progressive. Fortunately Moreno secured a promise from the UK that Assange would not be sent to a Country that still practices the death penalty. We’ll see if that promise is kept.

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  194. 194
    Steve in the ATL says:

    @rikyrah: I appreciate your confirming this. I arrived in Florida last night and thus have reduced mental capacity!

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  195. 195
    J R in WV says:

    @Don Beal:

    One comment in 2012, another when he was put in someone’s pie filter in 2017, then nothing until today. Ordinary Troll or Russian Stooge? Hard to say, but one or the other… for sure.

    Not interested in progressivism at all.

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  196. 196
    Betty Cracker says:

    @Don Beal: I’m 100% in favor of due process, even for malevolent scumbags like Assange. I will note that Assange is less likely to actually receive due process if extradited to the US, thanks in part to his own efforts to help put a corrupt autocrat in the White House, who then stocked the Department of Justice with hard-right ideologues. I’m filing that away under “Boo-Fucking-Hoo.”

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  197. 197
    Just One More Canuck says:

    @J R in WV: por que no los dos?

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  198. 198
    Tom Levenson says:

    @different-church-lady: Denny Crane!

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  199. 199
    Danjos says:

    With the current administration I cannot help but feel that there is something nefarious with this situation. I think they will find a way to botch the charges so that the next Democrat administration will be unable to repeat the charges against this piece-of-stuff.

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  200. 200
    WaterGirl says:

    @Miss Bianca: That’s a big milestone. Yay for all of you.

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  201. 201
    Don Beal says:

    I am an old geezer who has learned that minds are not easily changed by argument or facts. That is why I seldom post. But I have been a liberal activist since long before most of you were born. Sometimes I listen to other whistleblowers and their opinions on the matter.

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  202. 202
    a thousand flouncing lurkers (was fidelio) says:

    @Barbara: This is golden. Thank you.

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  203. 203
    GC says:

    Hopefully the extradition request will be denied. We have enough prosecutions of American journalists and whistle-blowers. We don’t need to import foreigners.

    In other news, Turkey continues to prosecute all the academics who signed a letter in favor of peace as apologists for terror. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? Asking for a friend.

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  204. 204
    mg_65 says:

    @Betty Cracker: I’m just retweeting your comments because you say exactly what I’m thinking, only better.

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  205. 205
    Spinoza Is My Co-Pilot says:

    My Bernie-or-Bust acquaintances here in the Valley of the (way too much) Sun are all in on defending Assange. We all get sick and tired of the Wilmer Wars online (and I get those who think we should back off some in fighting people who are ostensibly — or at least potentially — allies) but this is what we’re up against in dealing with lefties who still believe Hillary was the devil, and Assange is a “whistle-blowing” hero. Gonna be a long primary season…

    Fuck Assange (or whatever his real name is, don’t care). Hope he rots in jail.

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  206. 206
    prob50 says:

    @germy: he has a fierce sense of entitlement. Even more than my cat, who has no Pulitzer.

    Cat’s don’t need no Stinking Pulitzer, because the smart ones have mastered using their fierce sense of entitlement effectively enough to make us bend to their will.

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  207. 207
  208. 208
    No One You Know says:

    Even a guest has responsibilities. Not just rights. Assange does not have the right to claim that what he does is blameless and that his understanding of the law cannot be questioned. Or that his violations of the law in causing deliberate harm to others must be tolerated.

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