That October Surprise From The New York Times

Given the new developments in what we know about Donald Trump’s interactions with Russia, some of us have been kicking around that “Investigating Donald Trump, F.B.I. Sees No Clear Link to Russia” story that the New York Times served up on October 31, 2016.

Our own Tom Levenson has a theory:

James Fallows agreed.

Hillary Clinton tried to get the story out.

Here’s a more recent story on that connection to Alfa Bank.  Still ambiguous.

After the election, Times public editor Liz Spayd blasted the Times for that story. Editor Dean Baquet has given only short, weak responses like this one.

Here’s Southpaw:

 

 

210 replies
  1. 1
    Elizabelle says:

    Thank you, Cheryl. The FTF NY Times has to come clean, and they need some housecleaning over there.

    Paper of record, my ass. A roster of disaster hires cobbled in with some very good journalists, too.

  2. 2

    At some point I think it’s worth inquiring whether the Russians have kompromat on the Vichy Times, its editors, or its owners. There isn’t enough evidence to draw any definitive conclusions one way or the other, to be clear, but the fact that we can’t immediately dismiss the possibility out of hand is disturbing.

  3. 3
    JMG says:

    My guess: Sources for that story were FBI guys who’d been Times sources for many years of stories about crime in NTC and environs. This gave them not only trust, but a willingness to believe them based on fear of losing said sources, This required a rather spectacular ignorance of any history of the FBI itself, but lack of general knowledge seems to be a prerequisite for elite political reporters.

  4. 4
    Elizabelle says:

    @(((CassandraLeo))): Yeah. Something is way wrong at that paper besides the Sulzbergers and their Clinton Derangement Syndrome. (Which even showed up when they were reporting on the mail bombs to Democrats — remember that? — that was so last month or 6 weeks ago — anyway, they had to edit that crap out of their online stories.)

  5. 5
    Mary G says:

    Somewhere I read that Baquet admitted that the headline was poor, but he stands by every word of the story. What a weasel. They believe they can do no wrong and lash out at anyone who raises criticism as a hysterical emo liberal who just doesn’t understand how journalism works, because they are the Paper of Record who can do no wrong. The similarity to Twitler and Republicans in general is striking.

  6. 6
    TenguPhule says:

    As SC would say, the FTFNYT is garbage.

  7. 7
    A Ghost To Most says:

    Rules to live by:

    1. Stay on the road.
    2. Never eat anything bigger than your head.
    3. 186,000 mps. It’s the law.
    4. FTFNYT.

  8. 8
    TenguPhule says:

    Iowa Republican Steve King called the Congressional Black Caucus “a grievance committee” while appearing a far right podcast that has featured white nationalists.

    Why does this Nazi still have a job in government?

  9. 9
    piratedan says:

    tbh, not paying attention to what they SAY and paying particular attention to what they DO does indicate to me that there are some extremely compromised individuals at both the NYT and even CNN in regards to what stories are promoted and their placement in the eyes of the public. No other reason to explain why Dem “scandals” are given month-long breathless documentation with endless amounts of speculation while the most corrupt presidential candidate of the last 30 years is given nothing more than… oh well, here’s another scandal to be added to the pile with no more than a virtual shrug

  10. 10
    TenguPhule says:

    Ryan Zinke, Crook of the Interior, just called House rep Raul Grijalva (D) a drunk.

    I’m so old I remember when this kind of behavior from a federal official was not only considered shocking, but suicidal.

  11. 11
    TenguPhule says:

    @A Ghost To Most:

    3. 186,000 mps. It’s the law.

    More along the term of guidelines, really.

  12. 12
    Kay says:

    It’s so disturbing to me because my overwhelming feeling was they just didn’t believe there was any Trump/Russia connection, so they dismissed it without any real investigation or inquiry.

    Like groupthink. Influential people decided early on that this was a dead end and then the rest all followed.

    It’s scary because it’s purely subjective. The Clinton emails were deemed “important” and the Trump/Russia story was deemed “unimportant” not based on anything real but instead based on what they believe about those two people.

  13. 13
    D58826 says:

    OT – 7.0 earthquake near Anchorage Alaska with tsunami warnings

  14. 14
    Adam L Silverman says:

    The same thing happened with the Access Hollywood tape leak to David Farenthold. The Clinton campaign, as well as the campaign surrogates, were all moving to flood the zone that Friday in August October about the hacks and the Wikileaks disclosures and potential connections to and coordination with the Trump campaign in the context of Trump business connections to Russia. As this is being scheduled, with bookers at NBC and MSNBC scrambling to get everyone lined up for the Friday afternoon and evening shows, as well as for Meet the Press on Sunday and AM Joy on both Saturday and Sunday, as well as Alex Witt’s blocks on Saturday afternoon, someone at NBC anonymously sends the tape over to Farenthold.

    Farenthold and the WaPo did the right thing in terms of journalism. They quickly and efficiently vetted the veracity of the tape and then wrote up and published the reporting in combination with publishing the tape on the WaPo website and social media platforms. By the time Chris Matthews came on the air at 7 PM EDT for Hardball, all of those Clinton campaign officials, all of the campaign surrogates, and all of the outside subject matter experts booked to speak about the hacking and Wikileaks and the Trump Organization’s pursuit of business in Russia and the President’s very public attempts to cozy up to Putin were all cancelled. Instead everything had shifted to the Access Hollywood tape. And it stayed that way all through the weekend’s coverage on all three broadcast networks, MSNBC, CNN, and Fox.

    So who leaked the Access Hollywood tape to Farenthold that Friday morning? And why did they leak it just then? When it clearly would have maximum impact in diverting the news media’s, especially the broadcast and cable news media’s, attention from what was both an act of war conducted in the cyber domain and a cyber crime by a series of linked hostile foreign state (Russia) and non-state (Wikileaks) actors on behalf of the President’s campaign. Those are the real questions about the Access Hollywood tape.

  15. 15
    catclub says:

    @TenguPhule: Its not just a good idea, its the law.

  16. 16
    TenguPhule says:

    Bowel movement: the push to change the way you poo

    /Headline of the day

    Shitting, like death, is a great leveller. It renders beluga caviar indistinguishable from tinned ham, a duchess as creaturely as a dog. Even God’s only son may be transformed by the act: the stercoranistes, an early Christian sect, believed in a double transubstantiation, Christ into the communion wafer, and thence into dung. Though at different times and places the excrement of certain personages – be they the Dalai Lama or those with “healthy” gut biomes – has been revered for its healing powers, shit itself is a strict egalitarian. Faecal-borne disease knows no kings; cholera can kill anyone.

  17. 17
    A Ghost To Most says:

    @TenguPhule: I really tend to focus on rule 1. That’s the one that counts in a state that feels that guardrails “are for dudes”.

  18. 18
    Kay says:

    Also, the complete and utter dismissal of Clinton’s claims. I mean, WTF? She was a secretary of state. She was a NY Senator. She KNOWS Donald Trump. Why was she deemed not credible immediately? That’s nuts. Even if you put it in context- she’s in a political campaign, Trump is her opponent, she’s pretty fucking credible on this stuff! At least her allegations deserved SOME inquiry.

    They just do not and did not believe Hillary Clinton as a person- they (incredibly) chose to believe Donald Trump, as a person. They all decided he was more credible. His word, they took. Clinton’s claims they dismissed out of hand, unexamined. Why?

  19. 19
    TenguPhule says:

    @Adam L Silverman:

    ? And why did they leak it just then? When it clearly would have maximum impact in diverting the news media’s, especially the broadcast and cable news media’s, attention from what was both an act of war conducted in the cyber domain and a cyber crime by a series of linked hostile foreign state (Russia) and non-state (Wikileaks) actors on behalf of the President’s campaign.

    If the Russians leaked a tape about Trump admitting he was a serial sex offender to distract from news he was a Russian asset they really must have had a good grounding of Republican sociology if they knew it wouldn’t stop them from still voting for him.

  20. 20
    TenguPhule says:

    @Kay:

    They just do not and did not believe Hillary Clinton as a person- they (incredibly) chose to believe Donald Trump, as a person. They all decided he was more credible. His word, they took. Clinton’s claims they dismissed out of hand, unexamined. Why?

    He promised to entertain the decadent court of media whores more then she did.

  21. 21
    Elizabelle says:

    @Adam L Silverman: We need an answer to that. Very, very curious.

  22. 22
    Snoopy says:

    story that the New York Times served up on October 31, 2018.

    I think this is meant to say: October 31, 2016.

  23. 23
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @TenguPhule: I’m not even sure it was the Russians. At NBC it could have been Matt Lauer or Andy Lack, both of whom were within the President’s orbit of influence.

  24. 24
    A Ghost To Most says:

    @Kay:
    It’s hard to wrap rationale thought around pure power plays.

    Facts don’t matter to fascists.

  25. 25
    Gin & Tonic says:

    I happen to know a little bit about how computers communicate with each other across networks, and that AlfaBank thing is still ambiguous even among subject matter experts.

  26. 26
    clay says:

    @Adam L Silverman: It’s still hard to believe that someone leaked the tape to HELP Trump. Everyone assumed he was DONE after that story broke.

    And he would’ve been, but for Comey’s letter.

  27. 27
    Kay says:

    @A Ghost To Most:

    A former sec of state and NY senator said that Donald Trump had sketchy ties to Putin and Russian political leaders.

    National media dismissed the claims and chose instead to believe Donald Trump’s denials, with no real inquiry into the claims of the former sec of state and senator.

    They had two competing claims. One they dismissed and one they chose to believe. In this case they chose to believe a pathological liar who lied every day of his campaign – so much so that they downplayed and minimized what was right in front of them.

    Sure. That makes sense. Perfectly reasonable and unbiased.

    You can’t even say they dismissed Clinton because she was in a campaign and Trump was her opponent because of course the same is true of Donald Trump, who they decided, inexplicably, to believe.

  28. 28
    Kelly says:

    @D58826: My sister in Anchorage lost power for an hour and has a lot of broken stuff. House and family OK. She’s a city of Anchorage librarian and her library is a mess. Building OK but lots of stuff knocked over and laying in water from broken pipes.

  29. 29
    Betty Cracker says:

    @clay: True. I sure thought he was toast after that. IIRC, most people did.

  30. 30
    JPL says:

    @Adam L Silverman: It was speculated that trump released Melania’s nude pictures in order to get in front of the story. I doubt that he’d release the grab them by the tapes though.

  31. 31
    JPL says:

    @Kelly: I glad she is okay.

  32. 32
    Elizabelle says:

    @clay: Leaked the tape to change the subject.

  33. 33
    Kay says:

    I keep waiting for the Wikileaks document dump on Trump.

    I’ll be waiting a long time. Apparently some information doesn’t want to be free. I look forward to the release of the stolen correspondence from Trump’s opponent in 2020. I can already tell that information is yearning for freedom, before it’s even composed and sent.

  34. 34

    @Elizabelle:

    Paper of record, my ass.

    They appear to think “paper of record” means “chosen mouthpiece of the elite”.

  35. 35
    oldster says:

    If there was ever a time when a paper is morally permitted to burn their sources, then this is it. More than that: they are morally *obligated* to burn them, to tell us the exact names of the FBI sources who lied to them for that 10/31 story.

    Luckily, in a few months we can make that “legally obligated,” by having Congress subpoena them.

    The rat-fuckers behind that story are nearly as guilty as Comey himself.

    When I read it, I already knew that it was rubbish, because of one fact: Paul Manafort.

    I had followed Manafort’s career in the Ukraine, and I knew that his presence on Trump’s campaign meant that it was a Putin-led influence operation.

    I mean: that’s who Manafort is: he is Putin’s man for subverting elections in the West. That’s what he does. You don’t hire him for any other reason.

  36. 36
    Elizabelle says:

    @Kay:

    Apparently some information doesn’t want to be free.

    This made me laugh. Thank you.

  37. 37
    Death Panel Truck says:

    @Kay:

    Clinton’s claims they dismissed out of hand, unexamined. Why?

    BECAUSE SHE’S A FUCKING DEMOCRAT!

    Duh!

  38. 38
    Emerald says:

    @Elizabelle:

    As I just wrote in a dead thread, the FTFNYT will never stop, but I think that some day we will get answers.

    I predict that 20 years from now (or it might take longer, but it will happen) numerous PhDs will be earned by dissecting the media coverage in the 2016 election and concluding that it was the major cause of Orangeymandiyus’s “victory.”

    I just hope I’m still alive and moderately conscious when History sets things straight.

    The FTFNYT will be exposed as they were on the Iraq War, but they’ll say that’s all in the past and continue doing the same thing. Again. And they will continue to drive major media coverage.

  39. 39
    Lee says:

    @JMG: I think that is exactly right.

    The last line of the post

    that seem to have served the purposes of a faction of the FBI at that point in the race.

    Is exactly on point. The NYT got played by the same FBI guys that set the last minute Clinton email announcement in motion.

    We will probably never know who they are but their fellow FBI members will.

  40. 40
    trollhattan says:

    Hillary was their Achilles and they enjoyed themselves immensely tossing darts and arrows at her, all while bemoaning the coming four years of drudgery covering President Everybody’s Mom.

    Hah, joke’s on them amirite?

  41. 41
    Martin says:

    @oldster: I agree. Confidentiality only applies to people acting in good faith.

  42. 42

    @Kay: I would start by going over the financial records of NYT.

  43. 43
    Elizabelle says:

    @Emerald: Might not even be 20 years.

  44. 44

    @trollhattan: NYT did the same to Kerry and Gore as well. Their animosity to D Presidential candidates runs deep and goes beyond Clintons.

  45. 45
    Elizabelle says:

    @schrodingers_cat: It’s so damn obvious, too. They set the tone and agenda, to too great an extent.

  46. 46
    clay says:

    @Elizabelle: That’s pretty crazy n-dimensional chess to think that the “grab ’em by the pussy” tape would end up being a net benefit, no matter what it was supposedly distracting from.

    I tend to think that it was actually released by someone who wanted to damage Trump, and it’s just an unfortunate coincidence that it drowned out the Wikileaks stuff.

  47. 47
    Martin says:

    @schrodingers_cat: Well, they seem particularly susceptible to being gamed by conservatives at the very least. See Judith Miller. Seems like a pretty reproducible pattern that you’d think they’d want to address internally. But no.

  48. 48
    tobie says:

    @oldster: Nadler’s committee should also haul IG Michael Horowitz’s ass back to the Hill to explain why his office apparently hasn’t investigated the leaks from the New York FBI field office. In June he testified:

    The Justice Department Inspector General testified Tuesday that his office’s most recent report did not include a comprehensive review of agents at the FBI’s New York field office looking for evidence that they opposed Hillary Clinton and leaked damaging information about her during the 2016 presidential campaign. […] “We looked at individuals connected to the Midyear review, and we were not out there looking at every single FBI agent’s personal devices, text messages, who had no role in the Midyear investigation,” Inspector General Michael Horowitz replied.

    Either Horowitz is an incredible poker player and hasn’t breathed a word about an ongoing investigation or he’s a partisan more loyal to the Republican party than to the law and the norms of institutions. I really don’t know which it is.

  49. 49
    Martin says:

    @Emerald: I suspect we might get those answers sooner. Surely Mueller is tripping over some of these individuals now.

  50. 50
    rikyrah says:

    @(((CassandraLeo))):
    It would be irresponsible not to speculate

  51. 51
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @clay: The leak was to change the emerging narrative that the President and his campaign and his business were playing footsie with hostile state and non-state foreign actors to steal the election. Moving it back to the well tread, and often Trump promoted, story that he was a womanizer who took what he wanted from women was never going to derail his nomination or his support by Republicans. The playbook that emerged in the early 00s for Republicans caught in sex scandals was to brazen it out, which, for Republicans and only Republicans, seems to be a successful strategy.

  52. 52
    ruemara says:

    @Kay: personal animus and not being a hot woman.

  53. 53
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @JPL: He didn’t leak that tape, someone at NBC did.

  54. 54
    rikyrah says:

    @Kay:
    It is more than that. They are Dolt45’s local paper, and, as you pointed out…
    They failed to vet him for the rest of the country.

  55. 55
  56. 56
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    Baquet is an incompetent hack. He needs to ride in the same tumbrel as Haberhack.

  57. 57
    JPL says:

    @Kelly: ABC News is saying it was two separate quakes. There’s been a lot of aftershocks, but that’s expected.

  58. 58
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @clay: Coincidence takes a lot of work. And in this case it is one example, if not the first one, in a pattern dating back to 2016 of fortuitous breaking news based on a leak of information at just the right time to divert the news media’s attention from even more damaging information about the President, his business, and his campaign.

  59. 59
    ruemara says:

    @clay: I never assumed he was done. He was a Republican. That’s all that ever mattered and with everything they had already said was no big deal, him boasting about being a sexual predator was hardly out of the ordinary for conservatives. In fact, I thought it would cement his he-man, alpha male facade.

    @Adam L Silverman: It does sound like experienced media people manipulating the media.

  60. 60
    JPL says:

    @Adam L Silverman: The only person harmed was Billy Bush.

  61. 61
    debbie says:

    I would like to lightly look at Trump’s tax returns.

  62. 62
    NotMax says:

    @TenguPhule

    Light thumbs its nose at the metric system.

  63. 63
    debbie says:

    @Elizabelle:

    I miss the days when they were the paper of record.

  64. 64

    @NotMax: In MKS system its even simpler, the velocity of light c = 3 x 10^8 m/s

  65. 65
    Tim C. says:

    With the Times and Comey and the crew, I still adhere to the “Weak Clinton” theory of motivation.

    1) Everyone believed there was no way Trump would win; therefore, there was no need to examine Trump, he was probably beyond dirty, but who cares.

    2) In order to prevent a 2018 style loss of the house and a loss of the Tenate as seen likely before election day, there must be maximum leverage to get enought Republicans out to vote. This means hate on Hillary, and ignore Trump and Republican sins and only focus on the largely imaginary sins of Clinton.

    3) Then they would have a weak Clinton presidency with pickups certain in the House and Senate in 2018 and a competent-ish Republican winning the White House in 2020, just in time to have another 10 years of dominance thanks to redistricting and an even better gerrymander.

    This is what The Times, Comey, and all the other sacks of crap that make up the establishment GOP wanted and were going for.

    Problem is Trump won and we are all in a world of shit.

  66. 66
    Corner Stone says:

    @Adam L Silverman: I am confused here. I recall a different timeline if we’re talking about the release of the Access Hollywood tape and the Wikileaks dump of Podesta’s hacked emails. If we’re talking about something else then I can see my error. However, the Access Hollywood tape came out on Oct 7, 2016 and within about an hour later the Wikileaks dump showed up. So the Wikileaks dumps came after the AH tape, IIRC, and even if AH tape drove some short term coverage, ISTM the timing of the Wikileaks dumps was in order to short circuit the AH tape. Not the other way round. Maybe I read the comment wrong.

  67. 67
    Fair Economist says:

    @clay: It is possible the intent was not to help Trump, but to avert examination of Russian ties that might have pulled in other Republicans.

  68. 68
    Brachiator says:

    @JMG:

    My guess: Sources for that story were FBI guys who’d been Times sources for many years of stories about crime in NTC and environs. This gave them not only trust, but a willingness to believe them based on fear of losing said sources,

    Sounds reasonable. Every newspaper and media outlet cultivates sources. But sources also have their own agendas, their own reasons for providing information, and smart reporters and editors have to consider this when doing their jobs.

    The NYT has a history of being bad evaluators of background info. Sy Hersh claims that one of the reasons that the NYT missed the significance of Watergate is because Henry Kissinger would make a daily late afternoon call to provide scoop on the White House, and he assured the Times that Watergate was nothing.

    This required a rather spectacular ignorance of any history of the FBI itself, but lack of general knowledge seems to be a prerequisite for elite political reporters.

    It’s probably more institutional arrogance. Trump screams about fake news and yet has always cultivated a relationship with the Times and still calls them directly. The Times editors foolishly believe that playing along is a good deal, even though Trump saves his best bullshit for Fox News.

  69. 69
    Elizabelle says:

    @Tim C.: Fuckers got their tax cut though. They are not in a world of shit, or don’t perceive it so yet.

  70. 70
    germy says:

    @debbie:

    I miss the days when they were the paper of record.

    Someone went digging in their 100+ year old archives:

    doing some archive work today, and leave it to the good old NYT, Sept. 9, 1907: LABOR UNIONS DESTROYED ROME…CONCENTRATION OF WEALTH A BENEFIT 🤣🤣🤣🤣Uhhh, plus ça change? pic.twitter.com/4v3YI1JrYB— Seth Bernard (@bernard_prof) November 30, 2018

  71. 71
    Corner Stone says:

    @Martin: Let’s hope so. And don’t call him Shirley.

  72. 72
    NotMax says:

    @debbbie

    I miss the days of records.

    ;)

  73. 73
    germy says:

    @JPL:

    The only person harmed was Billy Bush.

    “In all great causes, some innocent heads must roll.”

  74. 74
    Corner Stone says:

    @debbie:

    I would like to lightly look at Trump’s tax returns.

    I would also. By the beautiful light of a powerful Xerox or Canon multi-function device. As I lovingly, yet strongly – very strongly, scan them in and email to a new bigly Journolist email distribution list.

  75. 75
    Corner Stone says:

    @Tim C.: 1) Obama should have never hired Comey and had no reason to do so.
    2) Obama should have fired Comey after his gaseous PR stunt where he castigated HRC for almost an hour with his opinions before he concluded there was nothing to prosecute.

  76. 76
    debbie says:

    @germy:

    Dexter Filkins, John Burns, Steven Erlinger, Carlotta Gall, Linda Greenhouse, etc., etc., etc.

  77. 77
    Elizabelle says:

    @germy:

    Actually, the crash and burn of Billy Bush’s career was a benefit, IMHO. Smarmy little jackass.

  78. 78
    daddyj says:

    Cheryl, as Snoopy points out above, you have a typo at the end of your first graf. Date s/b “October 31, 2016

  79. 79
    Betty Cracker says:

    Candidates running for federal office, you say? :)

  80. 80
    TenguPhule says:

    @Snoopy:

    I think this is meant to say: October 31, 2016.

    Timey Wimey Ball.

  81. 81
    germy says:

    @Betty Cracker: Let’s wait until we hear Bernie’s response.

  82. 82
    trollhattan says:

    @Elizabelle:
    True, and we just got his Doppelganger on the Supreme Court.

  83. 83
  84. 84
    tobie says:

    @Betty Cracker: I’d like to see Warren tout the good governance bill to be voted on in the House come January. She could pledge to do whatever she can for the bill to be taken up in the Senate. I know as a member of the minority party she can’t do much but plugging the House bill would show she’s a team player. Trump’s made me allergic to politicians who only talk about their own initiatives.

  85. 85
    Elizabelle says:

    I think it’s interesting what people who have done wrong will cop to, later in life. In this case, the previous publisher “Pinch”, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., would admit to regrets over … Jayson Blair. An embarrassment, to be sure. Jayson did not get anyone killed, or remain to this day a lasting source of loss of blood and treasure and so much human potential.

    Crickets on having been the stooge for Judith Miller, though. No mention whatsoever.

    December 14, 2017: NY Times: A.G. Sulzberger, 37, to Take Over as New York Times Publisher (recap of Pinch’s accomplishments)

    The FTF NY Times aided and abetted the stealing of the presidency by a Russian asset, Donald J. Trump, whom historians will — very soon — conclude is/was the most awful president in U.S. history. And very likely an illegitimate one.

    So: the fetid and corrupted Grey Lady will have to be kicked and screaming to any kind of reckoning and admission of her lies and faults. But maybe Team Mueller, and Congressional Democrats even, can peel away some of the obfuscation.

  86. 86
    TenguPhule says:

    @Villago Delenda Est:

    Baquet is an incompetent hack. He needs to ride in the same tumbrel as Haberhack.

    That tumbel is going to have to do some heavy lifting.

  87. 87
    The Moar You Know says:

    Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin tweeted that her home was damaged in the quake.

    Because I care so very much: she has my thoughts and prayers. Hey, it’s good enough for people who have been shot and murdered, I’m sure her house will be fine in no time at all.

  88. 88
    TenguPhule says:

    @Corner Stone: Stop tempting me to break the law.

  89. 89
    JPL says:

    @Elizabelle: He was not liked by members of the Today crew, so for them it was a win.

  90. 90
    Mike in NC says:

    Just assume that the NY Times has been a big Trump booster for the past 40+ years.

  91. 91
    Miss Bianca says:

    @germy: pretty sure that was snark, but I still threw up in my mouth a little bit.

  92. 92
    The Moar You Know says:

    1) Obama should have never hired Comey and had no reason to do so.

    @Corner Stone: He put a Republican in charge of the FBI. When in my lifetime has a Republican president put a Dem in charge of anything?

    Love the guy, but he made some bad fucking decisions. There’s one right there.

  93. 93
    catclub says:

    @TenguPhule: Put Baquet and Haberhack in a croker sack with what … a Rooster and a wildcat?
    Then throw in river.

    yeah, I know, not fair to the rooster and cat.

  94. 94
    Schlemazel says:

    @(((CassandraLeo))):
    Seriously, I am convinced that the NY office of the FBI is compromised by the Russian mob.

    They fed this bullshit to the Times and at the same time forced the coward Comey to go public on Clinton.

  95. 95
    NotMax says:

    “There is no scheduled pull aside [with Putin],” a White House official said, according to the pool report.

    However, regarding a reacharound….

  96. 96
    catclub says:

    @The Moar You Know: Only Republican daddies can run the FBI or the Defense Department.
    Imagine if an actual Democrat ( say, only as partisan as Ken Starr) were given Mueller’s job.

  97. 97
    trollhattan says:

    @The Moar You Know:
    Yeah, to hell with her and her brood but I’m seeing stories and photos indicating widespread damage. Evidently the quake was only 7 miles from Anchorage and for a 7.0 that’s too damn close. If we have any snow jackals I wish you well!

  98. 98
    Schlemazel says:

    @The Moar You Know:
    I assume Revs Graham and Roberts will soon let us know that this was Gawd’s punishment for gay marriage

  99. 99
    trollhattan says:

    @NotMax:
    Yeah, sheesh, wording!

  100. 100
    Elizabelle says:

    @Schlemazel:

    I think that’s very much possible. And it would be in our national interest to put an end to that.

    LOL — I remember that the scariest villains on Law and Order were usually the Russian mob. Also the most unrepentant.

  101. 101
    catclub says:

    @The Moar You Know: Another is letting the same people who wrecked the economy be in charge of cleaning up the mess. unsurprisingly, no prosecutions resulted.

  102. 102
    Corner Stone says:

    @trollhattan:

    but I’m seeing stories and photos indicating widespread damage.

    What’s weird is that along with a few roads/bridges I keep seeing liquor stores with damaged bottles everywhere. And grocery stores where they only show like the wine or bottled goods aisles that are busted. I’ve only been to Anchorage once but the grocery store they keep showing is way nicer than anything I found while I was there in 2015.

  103. 103
    Emerald says:

    @Corner Stone:

    he castigated HRC for almost an hour with his opinions before he concluded there was nothing to prosecute.

    Two days later, Comey testified to Congress under questioning from Elijah Cummings. Cummings got him to admit that HRC had “acted reasonably” with her emails, that the emails in question were not correctly marked as classified.

    Later it transpired that none of those three emails actually was classified anyway.

    Media took no notice. Should have been a major story.

  104. 104
    Gozer says:

    Times as “paper of record”?

    It has always sidled up to and made excuses for the worst:
    https://www.nytimes.com/1937/05/30/archives/where-hitler-dreams-and-plans-at-the-berghof-on-a-bavarian-peak-he.html
    May 30, 1937

    WHERE HITLER DREAMS AND PLANS; At the Berghof on a Bavarian Peak He Lives Simply, Yet His Retreat Is Closely Guarded Hitler Has Transformed His Simple Chalet Into a Mansion and Impenetrable Fortress

    https://www.nytimes.com/1939/08/20/archives/herr-hitler-at-home-in-the-clouds-high-up-on-his-favorite-mountain.html
    Aug 20, 1939

    HERR HITLER AT HOME IN THE CLOUDS; High up on his favorite mountain he finds time for politics, solitude and frequent official parties.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buried_by_the_Times

    Buried by the Times

    Blame for the lack of coverage: Beside the biases and lack of competence of the European correspondents, Leff “points out the problems with journalistic convention of the time, which preferred reprinting government pronouncements to digging for unknown stories. There was also, of course, a disorganized Jewish community and a Roosevelt administration too preoccupied with the war, both not pushing hard enough for front-page coverage. But the bulk of the blame, in Leff’s telling, falls squarely at the feet of The Times’s publisher, Sulzberger.” [3]

    A number of observers have observed how badly informed the American public was about the Nazis’ systematic murder of European Jews. [5] [6] [7] Leff points out that the way the Times covered the Holocaust “contributed to the public’s ignorance.” But in addition to poorly informing the public, “The Times’ coverage mattered so much,” she writes, “because other bystanders, particularly the American government, American Jewish groups, and the rest of the American press, took cues from the paper. Among major American newspapers, it was unique in the information it received, how it disseminated the news, and to whom.”[8]

    https://www.vox.com/2015/2/11/8016017/ny-times-hitler

    The New York Times’ first article about Hitler’s rise is absolutely stunning

    On November 21, 1922, the New York Times published its very first article about Adolf Hitler. It’s an incredible read — especially its assertion that “Hitler’s anti-Semitism was not so violent or genuine as it sounded.” This attitude was, apparently, widespread among Germans at the time; many of them saw Hitler’s anti-Semitism as a ploy for votes among the German masses.

    But the really extraordinary part of the article is the three paragraphs on anti-Semitism. Brown acknowledges Hitler’s vicious anti-Semitism as the core of Hitler’s appeal — and notes the terrified Jewish community was fleeing from him — but goes on to dismiss it as a play to satiate the rubes (bolding mine):
    He is credibly credited with being actuated by lofty, unselfish patriotism. He probably does not know himself just what he wants to accomplish. The keynote of his propaganda in speaking and writing is violent anti-Semitism. His followers are nicknamed the “Hakenkreuzler.” So violent are Hitler’s fulminations against the Jews that a number of prominent Jewish citizens are reported to have sought safe asylums in the Bavarian highlands, easily reached by fast motor cars, whence they could hurry their women and children when forewarned of an anti-Semitic St. Bartholomew’s night.

    But several reliable, well-informed sources confirmed the idea that Hitler’s anti-Semitism was not so genuine or violent as it sounded, and that he was merely using anti-Semitic propaganda as a bait to catch masses of followers and keep them aroused, enthusiastic, and in line for the time when his organization is perfected and sufficiently powerful to be employed effectively for political purposes.

    A sophisticated politician credited Hitler with peculiar political cleverness for laying emphasis and over-emphasis on anti-Semitism, saying: “You can’t expect the masses to understand or appreciate your finer real aims. You must feed the masses with cruder morsels and ideas like anti-Semitism. It would be politically all wrong to tell them the truth about where you really are leading them.”

  105. 105

    @Corner Stone:

    1) Obama should have never hired Comey and had no reason to do so.
    2) Obama should have fired Comey after his gaseous PR stunt where he castigated HRC for almost an hour with his opinions before he concluded there was nothing to prosecute.

    Unfortunately, I don’t think 2) was politically practical. Once the Hillary email witch hunt was on and Comey was involved, it was too late. Firing him, or anyone else prominently involved in the investigation, would have looked like an attempt to protect her and hence increased the perception that there was substance to the accusations.

  106. 106
    TenguPhule says:

    @Emerald:

    Should have been a major story.

    Should is always stuck doing the heavy lifting.

  107. 107
    gratuitous says:

    I will assert, without any evidence to support the assertion, that the Times did these stories the way they did because they thought Clinton would beat Trump. When that happened, their reportage on Trump would disappear and the Clinton coverage would serve as fodder for endless “scandal” stories of dubious validity which would be carried forward by the Republican-controlled Congress. It would mean four uninterrupted years of Clinton scandals, reliving the glory days of the 1990s and the Great Clenis Hunt.

    When the unexpected happened, and Trump won the White House, the Times just wanted to jam their hands in their pockets, whistle nonchalantly, and wander away looking skyward. Please stop looking at the Times’ history. They’re embarrassed, too. Bringing it up again is just mean.

  108. 108
    TenguPhule says:

    @Gozer:

    But several reliable, well-informed sources confirmed the idea that Hitler’s anti-Semitism was not so genuine or violent as it sounded, and that he was merely using anti-Semitic propaganda as a bait to catch masses of followers and keep them aroused, enthusiastic, and in line for the time when his organization is perfected and sufficiently powerful to be employed effectively for political purposes.

    A sophisticated politician credited Hitler with peculiar political cleverness for laying emphasis and over-emphasis on anti-Semitism, saying: “You can’t expect the masses to understand or appreciate your finer real aims. You must feed the masses with cruder morsels and ideas like anti-Semitism. It would be politically all wrong to tell them the truth about where you really are leading them.”

    I hate this modern remake of the classics.

  109. 109
    Betty Cracker says:

    @tobie: Warren first introduced the bill in August. She’s tweeting about it today because Rep. Jayapal just introduced it in the House (in part to highlight Trump’s corruption, no doubt). I don’t think she’s trying to step on the House good governance bill, which won’t be introduced for a couple of months. I brought it up is because it’s interesting that she specified that candidates running for federal office should have to release their tax returns. If I didn’t know better, I’d suspect she was playing 11-D chess with an eye on potential 2020 opponents for the Democratic nomination.

  110. 110
    TenguPhule says:

    @Betty Cracker: It would disqualify Bernie Sanders.

  111. 111
    Betty Cracker says:

    @TenguPhule: Nothing gets past you, does it? :)

  112. 112
    Gozer says:

    @TenguPhule: Obviously this show needs to be cancelled in the same way as it was in the ’40s.

  113. 113
    TenguPhule says:

    Trump snubbed Putin at G-20 to cozy up to Mohammed bin Salman.

    Is this the part in the terrible romantic comedy where upset girlfriend tries to rebound with the hot young sadistic dictator over their traditional sugar daddy?

  114. 114

    @catclub:

    Put Baquet and Haberhack in a croker sack with what … a Rooster and a wildcat?
    Then throw in river.

    If you’re going to throw them in the river, why not include an anvil instead of some poor defenseless animals.

  115. 115
    Emerald says:

    @gratuitous: Without question, if HRC had won it would have been four years of constant “scandal” and investigations, all just as fabricated as the ones from the previous 30 years and all eagerly promoted by the FTFNYT in their ongoing character assassination.

    It would have damaged the country, but not as much as Dolt45 has done.

    But they will not stop smearing Hillary. They will never stop.

  116. 116
    Kay says:

    Ben Wessel
    ‏ @BenWessel
    1h1 hour ago
    More
    this is bananas:
    An individual who worked for the Harris campaign coordinated the effort to fill in, or discard, the ballots of Democratic voters who might have otherwise voted for McCready…affidavits come from elderly African-American voters. #NC09

    Good lord. We can’t get voter protection laws back fast enough. We need an emergency injunction.

  117. 117
    debbie says:

    @TenguPhule:

    “I won’t be ignored!”

  118. 118
    Immanentize says:

    I just realized after reading this post and some comments that the NYT’s statement/trope that:

    “the Russians did not act to elect Trump but to sow general disruption and undermine the integrity of the election”

    Is almost exactly like:

    “The Civil War was not fought over slavery, but about State’s rights and economic disputes.”

    Both wrong and based on also true substitutes for the primary reason

    Therefore, I suspect Sessions had a hand in this line …

  119. 119
    Ladyraxterinok says:

    @Adam L Silverman: Thanks for this. Didn’t realize the suspicious timing.

  120. 120
    debbie says:

    @Kay:

    Too much to think the Supreme Court will apologize?

  121. 121
    tobie says:

    @Betty Cracker: Thanks for the information about Rep. Jayapal introducing the legislation in the House. I didn’t read the linked article in the tweet, which was lazy on my part, only the top line “My bill to #EndCorruptionNow” and first line of the article, “My plan…” I got the gist from your and Germy’s post that the bill’s requirement that candidates release tax returns might be significant for some other potential Presidential contenders.

    By the way was the House’s good governance package (H.R. 1) announced today or just posted on Balloon Juice today?

  122. 122
    J R in WV says:

    @schrodingers_cat:

    I would start by going over the financial records of NYT.

    Interestingly, the Times management only owns 50% of the stock. The Sultzberger family, that is, owns half the company. There is a silent partner who owns half, Carlos Slim, the Mexican billionaire owns half, and in theory has no role in managing the day to day operations.

    ETA typo had>has
    Perhaps if he made a call to a managing editor they would take the call? maybe?

  123. 123
    TenguPhule says:

    @tobie:

    By the way was the House’s good governance package (H.R. 1) announced today or just posted on Balloon Juice today?

    Yes it was. Look down a few posts on the main page.

  124. 124
    PJ says:

    @The Moar You Know: @Corner Stone: Unfortunately, one of Obama’s worst instincts/beliefs was that he needed to “reach out” to Republicans, who had stated that their major policy goal (and really, only policy goal) was to remove him from the Presidency, and the end result was that he would start out negotiating already halfway to what he thought the Republicans wanted and they would never give an inch; “comity” demanded that Democrats advance Republican policies.

    (Related to this is the fact that he was elected in part because people wanted a change from Bush and Republican policies which had led to endless war and the impending recession, but he listened too much to “serious people” like Larry Summers who thought that the way to save the country was by saving the wealth of the wealthiest citizens first and propping up the banks that had caused the problem. A lot of the people I called to GOTV in 2010 were super-pissed about this. I think Obama and the Democrats would have done better at the polls down the line if they had pushed harder for a progressive agenda in the first two years, even if they didn’t get all they wanted, so that they could make a better case for what they stood for.)

  125. 125
    Gin & Tonic says:

    @Gozer: Yeah, and Walter Duranty, with a fucking Pulitzer. Ptui.

  126. 126
    TenguPhule says:

    @debbie:

    Too much to think the Supreme Court will apologize?

    Apologize? We’ll be lucky if five of them don’t throw a kegger on the court’s front steps.

  127. 127
    Ladyraxterinok says:

    @Kay: @Kay: Maybe if she had spoken through a man? Been a man? NOT been a Clinton?

  128. 128
    Hob says:

    @The Moar You Know:

    When in my lifetime has a Republican president put a Dem in charge of anything?

    I realize that was probably a rhetorical question, but just FYI, the actual answer (unless you were born very recently) is “fairly often.” You can see details here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_political_appointments_across_party_lines …a lot of them are for things like ambassadorships, but even if you take those out, it looks like it wasn’t so much that Obama made cross-party appointments more than usual as that Trump has barely done it at all.

  129. 129
    Betty Cracker says:

    @tobie: House Dems released details on what HR 1 will contain today, but it won’t be introduced until the new Congress is seated in January. From overviews I’ve read, it sounds like a great bill, but we’ll have to see the details about the release of presidential tax returns. In the AP’s description of the bill, it specifies that presidents have to release their tax returns. I’d prefer that requirement for presidential candidates too!

  130. 130
    Tim C. says:

    @Elizabelle: Oh, I’m not saying they aren’t sociopathic greed-headed morons. And not to mention all the rural dimwits who have gone past a moral event-horizon by voting for the GOP. I’m just saying what I think what passes for the thoughts of Comey and the Fucking NYT was.

  131. 131
    Corner Stone says:

    @Roger Moore:

    Firing him, or anyone else prominently involved in the investigation, would have looked like an attempt to protect her and hence increased the perception that there was substance to the accusations.

    Obviously, impossible to accurately game out. However, my contention is that firing Comey for cause before the election could not have possibly been more harmful than leaving him in office. Without hindsighting 20/20’ing it, if you’re Obama and feel somewhat confident that HRC will win then you take the political heat, if any, and clear the decks for her. Leaving Comey in office to be a thorn in HRC’s side, along with his inability to control the NYC FBI office would have done unimaginable damage to her nascent presidency. HRC could not have fired Comey after inauguration because *that* would have been a shitstorm 100 times larger than Obama firing Comey. It would have been like Zeus using the Squatty Potty on the US.

  132. 132
    Kay says:

    @debbie:

    It’s John Robert’s legacy as far as I’m concerned. A rolling disaster with him still on the bench.

    I don’t know- I’d die of shame every day. He could not have been more wrong. I still can’t get over the arrogance of it. John Roberts ignored the lived experience of AA’s on voting rights and substituted his own. They’re the experts and boy did they earn that. They paid for that experience. He ignored them.

    That’s the real measure of privilege. Who gets believed and who doesn’t.

  133. 133
    satby says:

    @TenguPhule:

    It would disqualify Bernie Sanders.

    And wouldn’t that be a beautiful outcome!

  134. 134
    TenguPhule says:

    Putin, in turn, had a friendly exchange with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, high-fiving and laughing with the kingdom’s de-facto leader who U.S. intelligence has fingered with ordering the brutal murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in October.

    blech.

  135. 135
    Ladyraxterinok says:

    @schrodingers_cat: Will never forget/forgive M Dowd’s weird/snide column about how Gore had the NERVE to ask a WOMAN for (fashion) advice! Ask a woman? He LISTENS to a woman!?!?

  136. 136
    TenguPhule says:

    @Kay:

    I don’t know- I’d die of shame every day. He could not have been more wrong. I still can’t get over the arrogance of it. John Roberts ignored the lived experience of AA’s on voting rights and substituted his own

    Kay, you seem to have confused arrogance for corruption. John Roberts knew exactly what he was doing. It was simply his nature to be a Scorpion.

  137. 137
    Corner Stone says:

    @Kay:

    He could not have been more wrong. I still can’t get over the arrogance of it. John Roberts ignored the lived experience of AA’s on voting rights and substituted his own.

    Something he’s been dying to do/rollback since his time in the Reagan WH. Absolutely nothing surprising about his conclusion.

  138. 138
    tobie says:

    @Betty Cracker: Yes, that would be nice. I’m just glad that the first Democratic House bill will address our woeful election infrastructure and registration system. There will be more good things after that.

  139. 139
    TenguPhule says:

    FUCK ITS FRIDAY.

    Homeland Security asks Pentagon to extend the military’s Mexico border deployment through at least January

    The Pentagon is expected to agree to the extension for the troops, who were sent by Trump ahead of the arrival of thousands of Central American migrants traveling in caravan groups and seeking to enter the United States.

    Officials have said an unspecified number of the 6,000 active-duty military personnel stationed along the border in Texas, Arizona and California would be brought home and replaced by other service members.

    Trump is determined to Kent State those migrants.

  140. 140
    J R in WV says:

    @Gozer:

    Times as “paper of record”?

    It has always sidled up to and made excuses for the worst:

    Followed by pages of pro Hitler publishing by the NY Times. Quite interesting historical material, they also published acres of great material on the US German Bund and their meetings in Madison Square Garden and parades down the Avenues of NYC, with scarlet banners and swastikas.

    The NY Times also supported genocidal actions by Josep Stalin in Ukraine, when all the harvested food was shipped out of the state, leaving the residents to starve that winter.

    The Moscow bureau chief was Walter Duranty, who reported that there was no famine, let alone that it was a deliberate action of the president of the Politbureau. He was there for 14 years, won a Pulitzer prize, no wonder we don’t understand Russian politics. Perhaps Duranty was forced by Russian hardliners to report as he did… he could have fled to his British homeland, or even to NYC, but nope. Just kept on reporting as required by Stalin – they were probably good friends, right?

  141. 141
    Elizabelle says:

    @Kay: John Roberts is Roger B. Taney for the jet age. He just has better hair.

    Calling balls and strikes. Right.

    He took the damn baseball diamond away.

  142. 142
    TenguPhule says:

    What kind of favor could justify keeping Michael Cohen, a “weak person and not a very smart person” as your personal lawyer and fixer, trusted with your life and your Stormy Daniels hush-money payments, for more than a decade? Here are my best guesses:

    One morning, many years ago, Michael Cohen found a young boy crying on a doorstep. His family had just been turned away from the place they hoped to live because of an illegal practice on the part of his landlord. “You’re a lawyer,” the boy said. “I have no money for you now, but if you can help me to get justice, I swear I will repay you many times over.” Michael Cohen refused to help. And wouldn’t you know? Donald Trump was that landlord.

    On Michael Cohen’s daughter’s wedding day, a man came to him with a simple request. “My daughter has been gravely insulted by a terrible man,” the man said. “Unspeakable, disgusting insults that beggar the imagination and haunt me every night. I have lost faith in America. I beg you to stand with me, against him. I will give you whatever you ask.” When Michael Cohen heard what the man had to say, he was so moved that he ran off immediately and volunteered to represent the terrible man. That was years ago. And, can you believe it? Donald Trump was that terrible man.

    One very cold and windy night, Michael Cohen was carrying a well-done steak through a snowstorm. He encountered a young boy selling matches who had lit his entire bundle so as to warm himself. He was shivering from cold and hunger. He held out his hands to Michael Cohen, begging for a scrap of meat. Michael Cohen kept walking and brought Donald Trump the steak while it was still mostly warm.

    Alexandra Petri, ladies and gentle germs.

  143. 143

    @TenguPhule: Don’t worry Gen Theranos has everything under control.

  144. 144

    @Kay: Child snatcher Kelly still gets good press.

  145. 145
    TenguPhule says:

    @schrodingers_cat:

    “Given the ongoing threat at our Southern border — today the Department of Homeland Security submitted a request for assistance to the Department of Defense to extend its support through January 31, 2019,” DHS spokeswoman Katie Waldman said in a statement. “This request refines support to ensure it remains aligned with the current situation, the nature of the mission, and [Customs and Border Protection] operational requirements.”

  146. 146
    jl says:

    @TenguPhule: Friendly? Exuberant is more accurate. They high fived and grinned at each other like two HS alpha bullies who had just kicked a little old lady’s lap dog across the street. And the miserable and bathetic face of Trump himself appears in the background in mid high five as he slouches through the door vainly failing to look like the big man.

    Krugman has an interesting tweet on how Russian media is suddenly and ostentatiously slagging, criticizing and ridiculing Trump. Maybe it’s just payback for their flunky being insolent in cancelling his job review meeting with Uncle Vlad. Or maybe Putin has moved to the latter stage of the ‘use ’em and lose ’em’ process. They would know a lot about whether Trump is finished, either politically or legally.

    It would be dangerous to have Trump still president while for all practical purposes disabled politically due to being undeniably guilty of many very bad acts. But OTOH, would be fun to watch the national GOP further discredit and damage itself by feeling forced to prop up the miserable skunk, for fear of retribution in the 2020 primaries. After that they could turn on him, but would be so late, would just make it worse for them electorally.

  147. 147
    Corner Stone says:

    @schrodingers_cat: Do you mean “Gen No Smoking Gun” ?

  148. 148
  149. 149
    germy says:

    This photo is shameful:

    Y'all president on the world stage. Sad. pic.twitter.com/a8r1EF9tDo— GEEZY (@gryking) November 30, 2018

  150. 150
    TenguPhule says:

    @jl: I know, I saw the video. Blech.

  151. 151
    joel hanes says:

    @PJ:

    I think Obama and the Democrats would have done better at the polls down the line

    Mr. Obama, peace be upon him, has always talked and acted as if his greatest goal was increase the common good of the nation as a whole by seeking to heal the divisions among us. That was the entire gist of the 2004 nominating speech which brought his gifts to the attention of the voters, and it remains an honorable aspiration. Unfortunately, putting the interests of the nation ahead of the interests of your party requires the other party to cooperate, and the Republicans have become the opposite of honorable in intent and in action.

  152. 152
    ruemara says:

    @Kay: IDK. That’s a very common experience of being black.

  153. 153
    trollhattan says:

    @germy:
    His face looks as though he just noticed Ivanka is wearing the flannel jammies.

  154. 154

    @Ladyraxterinok: Has she written a column criticizing the current President’s fashion sense or the lack there of? I stopped reading NYT more than 2 years ago, so I have no idea.

  155. 155
    jl says:

    @TenguPhule: It will be an iconic historical document in the future, should we have a future history.

  156. 156
    debbie says:

    @trollhattan:

    Or that Trudeau once again yelled out, “New NAFTA.”

  157. 157
    TenguPhule says:

    White officer indicted for murder in killing of black man in Dallas

    A grand jury today indicted a white former Dallas police officer for murder in the killing of her unarmed black neighbor when she says she mistakenly went to his apartment rather than her own and shot him.

    Dallas County court records showed the indictment before prosecutors were set to hold a news conference announcing it.

    Amber Guyger was arrested on a manslaughter charge three days after the Sept. 6 shooting of her 26-year-old neighbor Botham Jean, a native of the Caribbean island nation of St. Lucia who attended college in Arkansas and had been working in Dallas for accounting and consulting firm PwC.

    Book em, Danno.

  158. 158
    TenguPhule says:

    Hawaii Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard is scheduled to speak Sunday to progressive Democrats in New Hampshire as part of a series of discussions with prospective Democratic presidential candidates, a further indication that she is indeed looking at running for the Oval Office in 2020. The “meet and greet” is being hosted by the Rockingham County Democrats.

    New Hampshire holds the first presidential primary, making it, along with Iowa, a crucial campaign state for those seeking a presidential bid. Gabbard visited Iowa last month where she spoke at a Johnston County Democratic Party barbecue.

    Fuck. She’s not in my district, but on behalf of the State of Hawaii, I’m sorry we’re doing this to you all.

    Please make her lose the primary. Please.

  159. 159

    @TenguPhule: Fake Hindu is a Modi stooge.

  160. 160

    @Corner Stone: The same, the one with the immigrant mother, doncha know

  161. 161
    Ladyraxterinok says:

    @Gozer: A very good production–PBS America and the Holocausr in its series The American Experience.

    Emphasizes State Dept blocking European Jews from getting to US, esp the Consulate in Lisbon.

    The massive blatant anti-semitism in the US in the 30s stunned college students watching it in the 90s–help wanted ads in NYC ‘Only Christians need apply,’ Jews barred from hospitals, country clubs, resorts, etc

  162. 162
    Gin & Tonic says:

    @J R in WV: Walter Duranty had certain, um, peccadilloes? predilections? They were overlooked – and perhaps indulged – by the authorities and he lived a life of comfort in Moscow, without having to leave the city or to work very hard while he was in it.

  163. 163
    jl says:

    @PJ: Summers was following CW business leader and mainstream macroeconomist opinion that the 2007-2009 Great Recession would be a traditional post-WWII recession with a quick and full jobs market bounceback. Why they thought this was unclear at the time, given the steadily increasing problem of the jobless recovery, and a problem which actually started before the 2001 recession. Stiglitz, Baker, DeLong and Krugman were right, but even they had to admit that due to the decades long Great Moderation, there were no good estimates of what the fiscal multiplier would be, other than it should be greater than 1, and good to go big on fiscal support as an economic insurance policy.

    So, I am not sure there was enough consensus on best policy to get a progressive fiscal response through. Aid to homeowners with underwater mortgages, a new HOLC from the Depression Era would have been a good close substitute, but Geithner’s belief that saving the incumbent banks necessarily had to be the same thing as saving the financial industry prevented that. Strangely, McCain’s good econ adviser Zandi, HRC and Obama campaigns seriously considered HOLC, but political pressure stopped it. I blame Giethner, and maybe pressure from big banks that would go under. So much money had to be tied up in order to save the big banks and their buddies on Wall Street, not a lot left over for anything else. The fact that in accounting terms, the money was eventually paid back is irrelevant. The real cost was the opportunity cost of those funds in supporting the ‘lesser people’ which would have done a lot more to reduce the size and long term effects of the Great Recession. Even the few really good and honest (but never seen, never acknowledged by GOP) conservative and libertarian macroeconomists recognize that now.

  164. 164
    Chyron HR says:

    @TenguPhule:

    Gabbard 2020: “YOU SHALL HAVE NO GOD BEFORE BERNIE BUT ALSO ME TOO!”

  165. 165
    NotMax says:

    @Ladyraxterinok

    Father Coughlin on the newfangled radio, the KKK, the Bund, the Silver Shirts. It was open, ugly, and prevalent.

  166. 166
    catclub says:

    @Hob: My point still stands, No Democrats appointed to head FBI or Defense or the federal reserve, by Republicans, since Volcker in 1981. But plenty of Republicans appointed to those positions by Democrats. And frequently own goals doing it.
    Obama was the worst in this regard.

  167. 167
    TenguPhule says:

    @Chyron HR: Well played.

  168. 168
    Kay says:

    @ruemara:

    It’s funny, though. Roberts demanded current proof that the covered jurisdictions would discriminate against black voters:

    The Fifteenth Amendment commands that the right to
    vote shall not be denied or abridged on account of race or
    color, and it gives Congress the power to enforce that
    command. The Amendment is not designed to punish for
    the past; its purpose is to ensure a better future. See Rice
    v. Cayetano, 528 U. S. 495, 512 (2000) (“Consistent with
    the design of the Constitution, the [Fifteenth] Amendment
    is cast in fundamental terms, terms transcending the
    particular controversy which was the immediate impetus
    for its enactment.”). To serve that purpose, Congress—if it
    is to divide the States—must identify those jurisdictions to
    be singled out on a basis that makes sense in light of
    current conditions
    .

    Thanks to Roberts, we’ll have it. We’ll have example after example of these states continuing to discriminate against minority voters and it will be dated 2011, 2012, 2013 and so on. We’ll have piles of “current conditions”. North Carolina bragged about it on their legislature. It’s in the legislative record. Currently. In 2016. The Voting Rights Act was WHY they weren’t discriminating.

  169. 169
    catclub says:

    @TenguPhule: only question is how well the ‘I feared for my life’ defense, by a cop will work.
    Magic eight ball says: It usually works.

  170. 170
    debbie says:

    NYT newsroom right now: “Okay, I want 2 of you on this Trump Tower story. 5 of you, head out to Rusty Catheter, Ohio to interview Trump voters about Jews like Cohen ruining America. Maggie, ask Ivanka how betrayed she feels while you’re braiding her hair tonight. Now go, report”— TBogg (@tbogg) November 30, 2018

  171. 171
    Chris Johnson says:

    @germy: That photo is AWESOME.

    Seeing that, I am sure I was wrong about Trump fleeing to Russia. That is the face of a man who is NOT getting to run the fuck away and taunt his enemies from safety. That fucker’s going to come home and answer for what Putin ‘made him do’. I no longer think Putin is going to give him refuge, even for the purpose of throwing America into chaos. Looks like having Trumpy-Boo around is too horrible a prospect.

    I think Donald Trump had very different feelings boarding the plane, than he did after actually encountering the people he so depends on.

    That sulky face says they are NOT going to help him, one bit. I wonder who else is looking super pissed off around about now. Are there any shots of Bolton in Putin’s vicinity, and if so, does Bolton look as thrilled and overjoyed as usual, or is he also unhappy?

  172. 172

    @catclub: Volcker was appointed by Carter, probably a factor in his loss in 1980.

  173. 173
    🇺🇸🌎 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka)  🗳🌷 says:

    @catclub:
    The problem with that though is she went into a stanger’s apartment in an unofficial capacity, while acting as an officer of the law, and shot an unarmed man dead. And later made up some bullshit story after the fact about he she mistook his apartment for hers which was refuted by neighbors.

  174. 174
    tobie says:

    @jl: I didn’t realize that TARP limited the size of the stimulus (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act). My impression was that to win over some Republican votes, the Obama administration agreed to a stimulus of less that $1 trillion dollars. Larry Summers may have argued for this as well.They threw in tax breaks to woo the GOP and then Susan Collins came up with the idea that all direct aid to states had to be thrown out because “state aid” was not in her view “stimulative”. (Has she been right on anything in her career?) Even in its watered down form, the package stemmed the loss of jobs (roughly 800,000 a month on inauguration day) almost immediately.

  175. 175
    Doug R says:

    @TenguPhule: Maybe 186,000 MPs where you are, but around here light travels at 186,282 MPs.

  176. 176
    Mike in NC says:

    @germy: Trump’s face looks like the way it would get back when Junior farted at the dinner table.

  177. 177
    Elizabelle says:

    @debbie: LOL. TBogg for the win. Rusty Catheter.

  178. 178
    Baud says:

    I’m glad people are consistently recognizing what garbage the NYT is.

  179. 179
    NotMax says:

    @Mike in NC

    Upset that staff put the kibosh on his visiting and laying a wreath at Mengele’s house while in Buenos Aires.

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    catclub says:

    @🇺🇸🌎 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka)  🗳🌷: I know all that. And I still think the “I’m a cop and I feared for my life”
    defense has a good chance of working. White cop, black victim, it was dark ( or she can lie that it was dark).

    Any news on the bench trial of the three cops who backed up the shooter’s lies in the Laquan McDonald murder?
    It was a surprise that they even went to trial. The usual Blue Wall ignores those particular perjuries.

  181. 181
    catclub says:

    @Elizabelle: seconded.

  182. 182
    trollhattan says:

    @debbie:
    “Rusty Catheter, Ohio” FTW!

  183. 183
    ruemara says:

    @Kay: Not uncommon. Sadly.

  184. 184
    A Ghost To Most says:

    @Doug R: I like to keep it under 186,000. That way the cops don’t bother me.

  185. 185
    Corner Stone says:

    @Doug R: You have to adjust for altitude and air quality.

  186. 186
    captnkurt says:

    FTFNYT

    I think by now they qualify for an upgrade to FTGDMFNYMFT

  187. 187
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @Corner Stone: Wikileaks telegraphed the release. As did Roger Stone and other Trump surrogates.

  188. 188
    eemom says:

    @joel hanes:

    Ah, there you are. I’ve been wanting to thank you for that Philip Larkin poem last night.

    He was a brilliant writer. I am generally not much for poetry but I really enjoyed his two novels.

  189. 189

    @Adam L Silverman:

    Wikileaks telegraphed the release.

    That seems rather 19th century, haven’t they heard of the intertubes? //

  190. 190
    jl says:

    @tobie: I meant there was political limitation. Economically, we could have done both. Plenty of people would pay the US to borrow their money back then. Sadly, from what I have read, Summers fancied himself a political expert as well as economic, and he let his views on the politics color his view of the pure economics, which was moderately biased at that time towards the completely wrong CW to start with. DeLong has tried to defend his buddy and research partner Summers from that charge, but not very successfully I think.

    The fiscal stimulus was very successful, in the terms you report. But the onset of the Great Recession was worse and more rapid than the Great Depression, which is why economists were terrified. So, judging the stimulus by its immediate effect on job loss ignores the potential effect of more stimulus on gaining the previously lost jobs back. It’s like something in your side yard blows up and you put enough water on it to keep it from burning down the neighbors house, so you congratulate yourself. But them someone points out that if you had put more water on the fire, you could have saved your house as well.

    The specific institutions (like Wells Fargo, those crooks, really? And BofA, and Citibank goofs) were very expendable, and a lot of cash needed to be tied up for a long time to save them. That money would have been better spent reorganizing their bankrupt carcasses, keeping the financial system itself intact, and helping the millions of people who lost wealth in residential real estate keep more purchasing power through the recession.

  191. 191
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @Corner Stone: And yes, I kicked October for August. I’ve gone back and corrected it. Sorry for the confusion.

  192. 192
    eemom says:

    @Baud:

    I’m glad people are consistently recognizing what garbage the NYT is.

    What I finding striking is the consistency, and also the depth, of its garbagehood. We focus on the most glaring examples, but equally putrid are the mundane, everyday headlines with their misleading slant on what’s being reported, and the burial of key facts way down in the paragraphs that almost nobody reads.

  193. 193
    Citizen Alan says:

    @The Moar You Know:

    He put a Republican in charge of the FBI. When in my lifetime has a Republican president put a Dem in charge of anything?

    Actually, Dubya appointed Norm Minetta to be Sec of Transportation, and he was one of the few members of the Bush Administration to display any real competence on 9/11.

  194. 194
    matt says:

    At this point we have to consider the NYT to have been compromised by foreign intelligence and should essentially quarantine it and any information that comes out of it. I don’t really see any way that the NYT deserves its place in our media ecosystem given that state of affairs.

  195. 195
    Adam L Silverman says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA: Well played.

  196. 196

    @jl:

    Summers fancied himself a political expert as well as economic,

    That’s actually pretty pervasive among Economists.

    (Present company excluded, of course😎.)

  197. 197
    jl says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA: Like this blog, economists are usually wrong but never in doubt.

  198. 198
    Elizabelle says:

    @debbie: Back to that TBogg tweet. It is genius.

    Braiding Ivanka’s hair tonight. Pretty much.

  199. 199
    tobie says:

    @jl: Okay, now I get your point. The political will wasn’t there to do a real new deal, even though economically this would have been do-able and was necessary. I don’t know enough to say whether it would have been better to reorganize the financial system entirely or to save the banks with massive regulation. The stress tests and Dodd-Frank likely were not enough. What kills me is that we couldn’t pass a cramdown bill on home mortgages because Republicans and some Democrats screamed that would introduce moral hazard into the system. There’s no moral hazard for Wall Street. As Barney Frank famously said, “Heads I win, tails you lose.”

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    🇺🇸🌎 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka)  🗳🌷 says:

    @Elizabelle:
    I hate Ohio. It sucks to live here

  201. 201
    Elizabelle says:

    @🇺🇸🌎 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka)  🗳🌷: I would give some thought to moving. Whole country out there, Goku. Why must you stay in Ohio?

  202. 202
    🇺🇸🌎 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka)  🗳🌷 says:

    @matt:
    How would this be accomplished given the First Amendment?

  203. 203
    🇺🇸🌎 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka)  🗳🌷 says:

    @Elizabelle:
    Don’t currently have the financial means to do so. I also don’t have my degree or license yet.

  204. 204
    Miss Bianca says:

    @TenguPhule:

    “the threat on our southern border”. Jesus wept.

  205. 205
    TenguPhule says:

    @Miss Bianca: I know some people thought this was going away after the Midterms as just another Trump stunt.

    But its not going away. Its getting worse.

  206. 206
    jl says:

    @tobie: Sorry if I wasn’t clear. When I see (I think very deserving) (fakey) Nobel Prize, and libertarian-leaning, and very careful, economist like Vernon Smith writing a book on the Great Recession, and he is saying, look at the evidence, dammit, why didn’t we do a Great Depression style HOLC, instead of dumping all that money into saving crooked and incompetent banks, I figure something went very wrong. Smith agrees with Stiglitz? Weird.

    Even with evidence today, GOP would rave and froth that anyting like HOLC is commie handout for losers, and they’re still ready to cram as much money as possible down rich corporations’ gullets.

    Rethinking Housing Bubbles: The Role of Household and Bank Balance Sheets in Modeling Economic Cycles
    Cambridge U Press May 12, 2014
    by Steven D. Gjerstad and Vernon L. Smith

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    debbie says:

    @Elizabelle:

    Yeah, the hair-braiding is what cracked me up.

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    NeenerNeener says:

    @germy: My first thought was “He who smelt it, dealt it”.

  209. 209
    Hob says:

    @catclub: I wasn’t responding to you, but to someone else who had said something different (that Republicans never appoint Democrats to literally anything). So it’s no surprise that I didn’t address your point.

  210. 210

    @Elizabelle: I think its a wig of Barbie hair. Like father like daughter. WH basement is full of bald Barbies.

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