IOKIYAR Open Thread: Mick Mulvaney, All-Too-Honest Grifter

Yesterday:

 
Also yesterday:

In any other modern administration, Mulvaney would be gone by the time this post pops up (I’m writing it just after finishing the early-morning open thread). In *this* one, he’ll probably be given some special Trump-branded award for public service.

Mr. Mulvaney, who also runs the White House budget office, is a longtime critic of the Obama-era consumer bureau, including while serving in Congress. He was tapped by President Trump in November to temporarily run the bureau, in part because of his promise to sharply curtail it.

Since then, he has frozen all new investigations and slowed down existing inquiries by requiring employees to produce detailed justifications. He also sharply restricted the bureau’s access to bank data, arguing that its investigations created online security risks. And he has scaled back efforts to go after payday lenders, auto lenders and other financial services companies accused of preying on the vulnerable.

But he wants Congress to go further and has urged it to wrest funding of the independent watchdog from the Federal Reserve, a move that would give lawmakers — and those with access to them — more influence on the bureau’s actions. On Tuesday, he implored the financial services industry to help support the legislative changes he has requested…

The association, which invited Mr. Mulvaney to give the keynote address at its conference, strongly backs his efforts to consider the financial burdens on banks imposed by the bureau’s actions…


Bad news for Mulvaney’s staffers, “potentially”…


 
Also from Mick Mulvaney, while we decent people were otherwise occupied…

112 replies
  1. 1
    germy says:

    “For the reasons explained above, we now conclude that independent expenditures, including those made by corporations, do not give rise to corruption or the appearance of corruption.”
    — Justice Anthony Kennedy, Citizens United v. FEC.

  2. 2
    lollipopguild says:

    I guess this is some more “honesty” that Shania Twain liked about trump.

  3. 3
    Kay says:

    I’m so glad this is being covered. I feel like the Trumpsters love the doctor scandal because it keeps eyes off the real crooks in that administration. The doctor is just hapless and he made the mistake of getting involved with these assholes, which he will regret the rest of his life. He’s not a player. Mulvaney and Pruitt are the ones they’re protecting.

  4. 4
    Yarrow says:

    I can’t stand Haberman, but she’s right about this:

    This really is one of the hallmarks of the Trump era, but had mostly been just Trump doing it – saying the inside part out loud.

    But her, and other journalists saying it, means they know the game. They know these people say this sort of thing “inside” and privately and they–the journalists–don’t report it. They’re in on the game or maybe the grift.

  5. 5
    NotMax says:

    Never quite got how it is kosher for him to wear two hats.

    Does he also collect two salaries?

  6. 6
    lollipopguild says:

    @NotMax: Everything is ok if you work for trump.

  7. 7
    The Moar You Know says:

    Mick Mulvaney re his time in Congress “If you’re a lobbyist who never gave us money, I didn’t talk to you. If you’re a lobbyist who gave us money, I might talk to you.”

    Huh. An honest Congresscritter. Not that he meant to be.

  8. 8
    JGabriel says:

    Maggie Haberman:

    This really is one of the hallmarks of the Trump era, but had mostly been just Trump doing it – saying the inside part out loud. It’s spreading to appointees

    As a reporter, isn’t it your job to tell us the inside parts that pols aren’t saying? Why do we have to wait for the pols to say it out loud themselves before you’ll comment on it, Maggie?

  9. 9
    Roger Moore says:

    @Yarrow:

    But her, and other journalists saying it, means they know the game. They know these people say this sort of thing “inside” and privately and they–the journalists–don’t report it. They’re in on the game or maybe the grift.

    It’s the same thing as them always coming up with some polite way of avoiding calling Trump a liar. He always makes false or misleading statements, supposedly because they can’t prove he knows better. It’s a bullshit excuse they wouldn’t make for any Democrat, but we’re supposed to play along.

  10. 10
    JGabriel says:

    NotMax:

    Never quite got how it is kosher for [Mulvaney] to wear two hats.

    Does he also collect two salaries?

    I don’t know about two salaries, but I’m pretty sure he collects twice as many bribes.

  11. 11
    Nicole says:

    Ugh. But because he’s Republican, it’s okay with the folk who vote Republican, because that’s their team. And Slate has an article up about one of the Trump appointees to the judicial branch, with whom we’re now stuck, who feels that rich folk have a right to buy elections. They’re not even trying to pretend anymore.

  12. 12
    Yarrow says:

    @The Moar You Know: I’d rather have them say it out loud and admit to doing it so we can throw them in jail than have it all happen behind closed doors where only insiders and enabling stenographers have any idea what’s happening.

  13. 13
    Le Comte de Monte Cristo, fka Edmund Dantes says:

    Unless Deadbeat Donnie pulls a Blanton and pardons a bunch of people (including his own advisors) when he heads out the door, I don’t see how Pruitt and Mulvaney avoid prison terms in a post-Trump world.

  14. 14
    ruemara says:

    Well, Trumpers got what they voted for. Sincerely hope their financial health keels over.

  15. 15
    Yarrow says:

    @ruemara: The problem is, if Trumpers financial health keels over, all our financial health probably keels over as well.

  16. 16
    Chris says:

    This isn’t small government. This is organized crime.

    That’s what small government is. Government that’s too small to be of any concern for aristocrats, warlords, crime kingpins, and every other kind of petty tyrant. Ideally, a government small enough that these people, or at least some of them, can buy it without too much trouble.

  17. 17
    Ruckus says:

    @JGabriel:
    I know, I know, ask me!
    She’s bad at doing the job we think she’s getting paid for. We are only hearing about this from her because it’s now about a thousand miles past obvious. Rather than being just past.

  18. 18
    Roger Moore says:

    @Le Comte de Monte Cristo, fka Edmund Dantes:

    I don’t see how Pruitt and Mulvaney avoid prison terms in a post-Trump world.

    By moving to a country without an extradition treaty. Either that or by bribing the judges, which the courts Trump has been packing will rule is perfectly legal.

  19. 19
    Ruckus says:

    @Chris:
    Exactly.
    They don’t care to drown it in a bathtub, they want it small enough that they can buy it off on the cheap.

  20. 20

    @Ruckus: They don’t seem to understand that this will kill the goose that’s laying the golden eggs. One of the main reasons that the US economy is successful is that we have a rule of law and you don’t need to outbid your competitors in bribe money.

  21. 21
    Chris says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA:

    Capitalists will be the death of capitalism yet.

  22. 22
    Jeffro says:

    @Nicole: it is kind of shocking to think that any thinking human being could argue with a straight face that rich peoples unlimited donations don’t outweigh others first amendment (and other) constitutional rights

  23. 23
    Spanky says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA: Thing is, they don’t care if they kill the goose.

    IGMFY, mofos.

  24. 24
    rikyrah says:

    @Kay:
    So true, Kay

  25. 25

    @Chris:

    That’s what small government is.

    Close, but not quite. Small government is government that doesn’t stop the strong from hurting the weak. To the rank and file GOP voters, desegregation proved the need for small government. For the plutocrat donors, it operates on the level you’ve described. But it unites all branches of Republicanism in assholery.

  26. 26

    @Spanky: Of course, short term that works; then again, long term we’re all dead.

  27. 27
    Zach says:

    I bet the name change is legally significant. It’s called the the BCFP in Dodd-Frank, and there’s probably some ridiculous legal argument that some acts by the CFPB aren’t valid because they used the wrong name on the letterhead or something.

    In principle, the government should defend its defensible laws, fight some dumb claim like this, and win. In practice, the government will say “wups — well, we changed the name so nothing we did before matters but from now on you’d better listen to the BCFP!”

  28. 28
    Just One More Canuck says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA: Keynesian shill

  29. 29
    Libraryguy says:

    OT (of course!)

    We’re trying to help small animal rescue operation in North Carolina, Trew Love Rescue and Sanctuary, but it has been a slow month. We think they deserve more attention! If you feel like helping you can donate directly at their site or shop our store here.

    Thanks!

  30. 30
    Le Comte de Monte Cristo, fka Edmund Dantes says:

    @Roger Moore:

    My prediction is that neither of them move (remember that Ken Lay stayed around when it was obvious that he should bolt, same with Skilling, Madoff, and a whole host of slicksters that had the resources to avoid it). I suspect that most of the time, these clowns believe their own bullshit and think they’re bulletproof.

  31. 31
    danielx says:

    Fucking Mulvaney would look good in a tumbril.

  32. 32
    Timurid says:

    @Spanky:

    Après nous, le déluge.

  33. 33
  34. 34
    mainmata says:

    @JGabriel: I sympathize but reporters can’t report something that hasn’t actually been said. Sure, they can provide context that implies what that “inside voice” is undoubtedly saying but can’t actually report it as if it was actual news. For example, this would be allowable: “Former Congressman Mick Mulvaney, who has received substantial campaign contributions from payday lenders and other financial services companies is in a potentially conflicted position as the Acting Director of the CFPB, which has the responsibility of protecting consumers from precisely these industries.”

  35. 35
    ruemara says:

    @Yarrow: As with the ACA, these Trump admin decisions tend to hit their fans first.

  36. 36

    @germy:

    Can we get Justice Kennedy disbarred for his incompetence (or even corruption)? He and the other SCOTUS who sided with the moneybags allowed this rot to consume us.

  37. 37
    Parfigliano says:

    @ruemara: to generous. hope for them to keel over

  38. 38
    Jack the Second says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA: Same deal with labor unions and negotiated contracts. The long run consequences of getting rid of them include “disgruntled workers setting factories on fire”. The US walked a really narrow line in the first half of the 20th century to end up “still pretty capitalist”. There’s still time to try another worker-led revolution and see if it works better in a post-democratic country than in a monarchy.

  39. 39

    These corrupt arrogant grifters depress the hell out of me. It feels like I’ve been way too sunny in my assessment of my fellow human beings.

  40. 40
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    Mulvaney is utterly corrupt, and to save money, we should dispense with due process in this case and simply execute him now.

  41. 41
    Kay says:

    The Cleveland paper endorsed Kucinich and they already reget it :)

    That Kucinich continues to take money from pro-Assad groups is shameful. And it’s equally troubling – and revealing – that he would prefer to skate on the need to reveal this influence.
    Kucinich’s Ohio Ethics Commission Financial Disclosure Statement, required now that he’s a candidate for Ohio governor, and filed April 9, wrongly omitted the sources of his earnings last year for “paid speeches.”

    He’s horrible. He has successfully concealed the fact that he’s horrible but really it was apparent to anyone who bothered to look. It’s sad and “unfair” but some people are just better than other people- in this instance Cordray is better than Kucinich.

    Fair? Perhaps not! But true. Relatedly, Donald Trump is a bad person and one didn’t need a graduate degree to figure that out. Don’t admire or promote bad people! There are less-bad people, so opt for one of them.

  42. 42
    Mayur says:

    @Villago Delenda Est: “Wait, I haven’t even been arrested, charged, or arraigned! What’s the crime?”

    “You’re a corrupt thieving plutocratic douchebag. Arrested and proved. Someone grab the big scimitar.”

  43. 43
    Mayur says:

    @Villago Delenda Est: “Wait, I haven’t even been arrested, charged, or arraigned! What’s the crime?”

    “You’re a corrupt thieving plutocratic douchebag. Alleged, attested, and proved. Someone grab the big scimitar.”

  44. 44
    Ridnik Chrome says:

    “I don’t see anything in here that says I have to run a Yelp for financial services”

    What an arrogant prick. How do you even answer a statement like that?

  45. 45
    The Moar You Know says:

    Can we get Justice Kennedy disbarred for his incompetence (or even corruption)?

    @PaulWartenberg: No requirement for a Supreme Court justice to be a member of the bar or, in fact, any sort of lawyer whatsoever.

  46. 46
    J R in WV says:

    One of my earliest memories of politics was when Governor Barron was convicted for corruption, a long time ago. IIRC he used to go to The Greenbrier resort and gamble at a nearby speakeasy-type club, at a time when gambling of all sorts was strictly illegal. And he always won. A LOT.

    From people with lots of business with the state government. The level of corruption in his administration was 100%, and I would guess the arrogance was too, as they seem to march together in lockstep.

    I never figured that we would have that same level of corruption in our federal government. Ever. But these guys are for sale. Obviously. They may as well have a sign with things they are willing to do and how much you need to bring in a plain envelope, or perhaps a contract. ‘Cause that much money won’t fit in an envelope. Maybe a leather attache case.

    The whole Republican party seems bought and paid for by those RWNJ billionaires, who don’t seem to realize that they will suffer the same as we do when the environment collapses along with the economy.

  47. 47
    Spanky says:

    @Villago Delenda Est: You’re stealing Tenguphule’s schtick. Of course, for a long time it looked like he was stealing your schtick.

    On the third hand, no one has ever seen the two of you together. Hmmmmmmm.

  48. 48
    Jeffro says:

    @Ridnik Chrome:

    What an arrogant prick. How do you even answer a statement like that?

    Well, you start off with, “Look you arrogant prick…” and then REALLY let him have it. Totally serious.

  49. 49
    Kay says:

    @Ridnik Chrome:

    How awful is it that financial services companies are eagerly backing efforts to give their customers LESS information?

    Probably shouldn’t trust them with your life savings if they’re in bed with this crook. I love how they care not at all about their reputations or trust or credibility. I mean, Jesus. They handle peoples’ money! They don’t think they need trust?

    They think they’re entitled to our money and our trust. That they get it unearned. They’re not even good capitalists let alone serving the public. They seek to screw their own customers. They’re contra to the interests of the people who pay them. It’s outrageous. It’s as if McDonald’s deliberately set out to give people food poisoning and then bragged about it – “screw them- they deserve to puke for being dumb enough to trust us”

    It’s such a weird mindset. They win when their customers lose.

  50. 50
    Chris says:

    @Ridnik Chrome:

    How do you even answer a statement like that?

    What’s wrong with “fuck you?”

  51. 51
    Jeffro says:

    I see that Trumpov in his infinite wisdom has decided to duke it out over the Ronny Jackson nomination. Sounds good to me – go for it, Dumb Godfather! I’m sure your fellow Goopers will appreciate having to fall in line for THAT guy (or alternatively, will really appreciate all the names you’ll be calling them on Twitter when they oppose this obviously unfit nominee).

  52. 52
    trnc says:

    @NotMax:

    Does he also collect two salaries?

    Sure as hell wouldn’t be surprised, but more worrisome are the salaries from (ahem) non-public sources.

  53. 53
    BC in Illinois says:

    A few decades back, Time Magazine did a cover story on Tom DeLay. It said that on his desk he had a Bible and a print-out of who donated to the Republicans and who donated to the Democrats. I don’t know what the Bible was doing there, but there is no question what the print out was doing there.

    It was a public declaration that he was corrupt.

    Not only, “If you’re a lobbyist who never gave us money, I didn’t talk to you. If you’re a lobbyist who gave us money, I might talk to you.” . . . but also, “If you donated to the other guys, I don’t talk to you.”

  54. 54
    Yutsano says:

    @NotMax: Acting administrators are only supposed to draw their salary from their original appointment. However it’s the Dolt45 administration. It wouldn’t surprise me if he figured out how to double dip there.

  55. 55
    Kay says:

    The Onion just brings so much pleasure to millions…

    Stormy Daniels, James Comey Arrive At White House For State Dinner

    The Onion employees voted to join a union and their employer hasn’t formally recognized it yet. Hopefully they won’t drag it out.

  56. 56
    kindness says:

    It’s my guess that Republicans think every future Democratic administration will be like Obama’s in that rather than spend a lot of time charging these folk with crimes and then prosecuting them they will sweep it all under the rug as a grand gesture of comity in the hopes that they will work well with the Republican party on legislation. That didn’t work out so well for Obama now, did it?

    I can’t wait to see the look on their faces come February of 2021.

  57. 57
    Ceci n est pas mon nym says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA:

    Of course, short term that works; then again, long term we’re all dead.

    Anybody ever read Stephen King’s Under the Dome? Not one of my favorites as the entire premise is (evil) deus ex machine from start to finish (unknown outside forces, possibly aliens, cause this horrible thing to happen for no particular reason, and then cause it to end for no particular reason).

    Anyway he takes this principle of greedy parasites killing everybody to its literal limit. Cut off from the outside world, the greedy politician diverts most of the precious resources to his industrial-scale meth plant, an action which eventually results in a fire which consumes all the available oxygen. Everybody dies, the end.

    I thought it was a little far-fetched for somebody to be that evil /short-sighted / greedy. But King is a student of human nature. In Maine, which has a governor who would probably do just that.

  58. 58
    The Moar You Know says:

    It’s my guess that Republicans think every future Democratic administration will be like Obama’s in that rather than spend a lot of time charging these folk with crimes and then prosecuting them they will sweep it all under the rug as a grand gesture of comity in the hopes that they will work well with the Republican party on legislation. That didn’t work out so well for Obama now, did it?

    @kindness: Pelosi made that call in 2006. One of her very few mistakes, and it was a whopper. Not much Obama could do, as his presidency was still two years in the future.

    But the general point I agree with. Dems REALLY fucked up not prosecuting Nixon. Which set the precedent for not prosecuting a lot of Reagan’s criminal cabal, and then Bush’s gang of idiots. We have been and still are the party of “comity”, and that shit needs to end now.

  59. 59
    hellslittlestangel says:

    I would not want to be a former Mulvaney staffer still working in the House tonight.

    Yeah, right. I’m sure they’re terrified of facing consequences from the Republican-controlled House.

  60. 60
    Steve in the SFO says:

    @Le Comte de Monte Cristo, fka Edmund Dantes:

    Unless Deadbeat Donnie pulls a Blanton and pardons a bunch of people (including his own advisors) when he heads out the door, I don’t see how Pruitt and Mulvaney avoid prison terms in a post-Trump world.

    Haven’t heard that name in decades! A weatherman in Nashville recorded a song to the tune of the Andrews Sisters’ “Chattanooga Choo-choo”.

    “Pardon me, Ray….”

  61. 61
    🌎 🇺🇸 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka) 🗳 🌷 says:

    @Nicole:
    Can’t they be removed?

  62. 62
    🌎 🇺🇸 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka) 🗳 🌷 says:

    @hellslittlestangel:
    I think they’re more concerned about facing consequences after next January.

  63. 63
    Steve in the SFO says:

    @Ruckus: Grover Norquist has been awfully quiet lately. Not that I’m complaining.

  64. 64
    🌎 🇺🇸 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka) 🗳 🌷 says:

    @Ceci n est pas mon nym:
    I didn’t like it because there was a Reasonable Republican thrown in for no reason. She drove an electric car and everything. Even it being New England, I could not suspend my disbelief.

  65. 65
  66. 66
    hellslittlestangel says:

    @Steve in the SFO: He got a president with enough working digits to handle a pen. The digits may be short, but nevertheless his work is done.

  67. 67
    Yutsano says:

    @Steve in the SFO: @hellslittlestangel: Now that you mention it…he was awful quiet about the big tax cut deal. Unless it got lost in a bunch of other noise and ended up not mattering in the end.

  68. 68
    rikyrah says:

    Thing that a Black man can’t do without risking his life
    Give a beggar change at the 7-11

    THREAD

    https://twitter.com/kelseybew_/status/989132611854524417?s=20

  69. 69
    Nicole says:

    @🌎 🇺🇸 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka) 🗳 🌷: Lifetime appointments. Which the GOP blocked Obama from making, and now are pushing through like crazy, so even if we take over in 2018 and get the WH in 2020, we’re still stuck with these racist, misogynist a-holes, possibly for the next 50 years.

  70. 70
    Duane says:

    @danielx: Mulvany would look good in a tar and feather suit.

  71. 71
    Roger Moore says:

    @Steve in the SFO:

    Grover Norquist has been awfully quiet lately.

    Why has he not yet drowned in his bathtub?

  72. 72
    MomSense says:

    When you talk to your friends, acquaintances, and family members about the midterm elections, talk to them about the chaos and corruption of the trump administration and Republican members of Congress.

    We need to stop this out of control corruption. They are robbing us blind.

  73. 73
    Chris says:

    @Kay:

    This is one of those things where they’re living in the post-Reagan bubble where they think their variation of uncontrolled capitalism is the only choice in the world, and if they screw their customers/workers, well, what are the customers/workers going to do, anyway? There’s no other option.

    @Jeffro:

    Sounds good to me – go for it, Dumb Godfather!

    Donald Trump: the worst traits of Sonny and Fredo combined into one person, without the redeeming qualities of either.

  74. 74
    tobie says:

    @The Moar You Know:

    Pelosi made that call in 2006.

    Anything else you want to blame Pelosi for? Sorry…I don’t buy that this was her call alone.

  75. 75
    ruemara says:

    @Steve in the SFO: Oh, goody. I hope it’s serious and involved falling into a grinder.

  76. 76
    trollhattan says:

    @BC in Illinois:
    Tom DeLay had the most straightforward path imaginable to becoming a Republican congresscritter–pest exterminator. Always wondered if “King of the Hill’s” Dale Gribble was fashioned after DeLay.

  77. 77
    NorthLeft12 says:

    @Le Comte de Monte Cristo, fka Edmund Dantes:

    I don’t see how Pruitt and Mulvaney avoid prison terms in a post-Trump world.

    I’m sorry, but that will never, ever happen. Unless the post-Trump world means he is overthrown violently, and swift and brutal punishment is meted out to those who were too stupid to flee to another country, there will be absolutely no consequences for their corruption and theft.

  78. 78
    TenguPhule says:

    @germy:

    do not give rise to corruption or the appearance of corruption.”

    “Similarly, plunging a knife into a Republican’s chest does not rise to an act of murder or the appearance of murder because its not certain if the knife is the cause of death or if the victim just naturally decided to bleed out.”

  79. 79
    TenguPhule says:

    @NotMax:

    Does he also collect two salaries?

    What makes you think he settled for only two?

  80. 80
    TenguPhule says:

    @Le Comte de Monte Cristo, fka Edmund Dantes:

    I don’t see how Pruitt and Mulvaney avoid prison terms in a post-Trump world.

    Trump appointed judges rule that corruption is legal.

    Crime then pays.

  81. 81
    TenguPhule says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA:

    They don’t seem to understand that this will kill the goose that’s laying the golden eggs. One of the main reasons that the US economy is successful is that we have a rule of law and you don’t need to outbid your competitors in bribe money.

    They’ve compared our economy to Russia’s and decided that they’re fine with wrecking the whole thing provided they get dibs on the remaining shiny bits. They think bribes will be cheaper then simply paying taxes.

  82. 82
    Ruckus says:

    @🐾BillinGlendaleCA:
    Among the many other things that people who can only see green are guilty of, it’s long term recklessness in their own long term benefit.

  83. 83
    TenguPhule says:

    @Dorothy A. Winsor (formerly Iowa Old Lady):

    It feels like I’ve been way too sunny in my assessment of my fellow human beings.

    Come sit by me.

  84. 84
    TenguPhule says:

    @Villago Delenda Est:

    Mulvaney is utterly corrupt, and to save money, we should dispense with due process in this case and simply execute him now.

    I concur. Guilt in his case has already been established beyond any reasonable doubt.

  85. 85
    TenguPhule says:

    @Ridnik Chrome:

    How do you even answer a statement like that?

    You cut his head off and mount it on a pike in front of his office.

  86. 86
    Jeffro says:

    @Chris:

    This is one of those things where they’re living in the post-Reagan bubble where they think their variation of uncontrolled capitalism is the only choice in the world, and if they screw their customers/workers, well, what are the customers/workers going to do, anyway? There’s no other option.

    It’s fun to walk a RWNJ through that (making them realize that there are indeed other options and ways to organize every/anything).

    It’s even more fun to walk them through the idea that, should the Dems ever decide on some payback, we’ll have progressive taxes so steep that the effective national income LIMIT is $100K. “Since you tried to take everything from the 99%, we’re more than happy to repay the favor”.

  87. 87
    TenguPhule says:

    @The Moar You Know:

    No requirement for a Supreme Court justice to be a member of the bar or, in fact, any sort of lawyer whatsoever.

    Which is how Bush Jr tried to nominate a twit.

  88. 88
    The Moar You Know says:

    Anything else you want to blame Pelosi for?

    @tobie: Not really.

    Sorry…I don’t buy that this was her call alone.

    That’s your privilege. She was the one who made the statement in public. If you have information that others were in on that decision, please do share.

    Background: I lived in Pelosi’s district for six years and in addition to the national stuff everyone sees, she’s a hell of a rep for her constituents. I’m no Pelosi basher, quite the opposite. But she (and the possible but yet unnamed parties to the decision to not go after any of the Bush criminal cabal) fucked up hard on that decision.

  89. 89
    germy says:

    Let @MSNBC know that you stand with @JoyAnnReid. pic.twitter.com/qkMuNaoZMr
    — Hillary Warned Us (@HillaryWarnedUs) April 25, 2018

  90. 90
    arrieve says:

    @rikyrah: That is a horrifying story. Thanks for sharing. The fact that he didn’t dare take his phone out of his pocket because he expected the cop to shoot him says everything you need to know about the effed-up state of policing in this country.

  91. 91
    TenguPhule says:

    @Spanky: To be fair, I was initally in the “give them a fair trial, then convict and execute them” camp.

    The last year has convinced me that Village has a point. Its faster, cheaper and easier to do things his way.

  92. 92
    Ruckus says:

    @Steve in the SFO:
    I hope at some point that conservatives realize that they are getting exactly what they asked for.
    Of course I also hope that at some point soon they get exactly what they are asking for.

  93. 93
    TenguPhule says:

    @Nicole:

    we’re still stuck with these racist, misogynist a-holes, possibly for the next 50 years.

    Life can be unexpectedly short.

  94. 94
    TenguPhule says:

    @Roger Moore:

    Why has he not yet drowned in his bathtub?

    Lack of available plumbers.

  95. 95
    TenguPhule says:

    @tobie:

    Sorry…I don’t buy that this was her call alone.

    True. Blame is spread to Harry Reid and a good chunk or House and Senate Members. We literally did not have a majority within our own caucus to pursue the Bush Cabal. Which led to more third party traction because that kind of stupidity in the name of bipartisanship is not conductive to stronger Democratic party support. Sanders and the Greens wouldn’t have half the allure they do now if not for this kind of thing.

  96. 96
    TenguPhule says:

    @NorthLeft12:

    Unless the post-Trump world means he is overthrown violently, and swift and brutal punishment is meted out to those who were too stupid to flee to another country,

    I thought you’re supposed to make this sound like a bad thing.

  97. 97
    Mnemosyne says:

    @The Moar You Know:

    She was the one who made the statement in public. If you have information that others were in on that decision, please do share.

    You mean other than knowing how Congress actually works? There’s no way Pelosi would have made that statement as the spokesperson for the House Democrats without having the caucus discuss it.

    But, hey, why hold back on blaming the spokeswoman for the decision of the caucus? We all know that women are responsible for everything men do.

  98. 98
    TenguPhule says:

    @Mnemosyne: To be fair, a lot of the blame laying on Pelosi for this is due to how well she held the caucus together during the Bush years and how as the spokesperson was the face going out on television to blast the Bush cabal’s actions as stupid, harmful and corrupt. Having her then later say that the Democrats intended to let bygones be bygones was not conductive to raising voting base morale.

    Basically, if she could whip them into shape over Social Security privatization, a lot of people wondered why she couldn’t do the same when it came to obvious corruption and shit that got a lot of innocent people killed.

  99. 99
    Calouste says:

    @TenguPhule: He accepted an appointment by the shitgibbon, what other proof of guilt is needed?

  100. 100
    Gin & Tonic says:

    @Mnemosyne:

    We all know that women are responsible for everything men do.

    Only the bad stuff. The good stuff we did on our own without any help from the chicks.

  101. 101
    TenguPhule says:

    @Calouste: In this case he literally confessed in a public setting, so it makes things so much simpler.

  102. 102
    🌎 🇺🇸 Goku (aka Amerikan Baka) 🗳 🌷 says:

    @NorthLeft12:
    Sign me up if it looks like they’re gonna get away with it.

  103. 103
    Mnemosyne says:

    @TenguPhule:

    I’ll go ahead and say what I otherwise would not say: there were quite a few powerful Democrats implicated in Iraq, and I don’t mean Hillary Clinton. The Democratic caucus was unwilling to let the chips fall where they may and put people like DiFi and Jane Harmon on the chopping block.

    The one thing we have going for us now is that, as far as anyone can tell, very few Democrats took the bait and got involved with the Russians, so Democrats in Congress can worry a lot less about who’s going to get caught up in that net when the investigations start.

  104. 104
    TenguPhule says:

    @Mnemosyne: My sense is that if we don’t let the chips fall where they may this time, a good chunk of the base is going to give up on the Democratic process entirely.

    When a system breaks you can fix it or wreck it.

  105. 105
    Ksmiami says:

    @Kay: avoid investing with the big guys use Schwab and vanguard

  106. 106
    Ksmiami says:

    @TenguPhule: the entire gop needs to be sunk in the marianas trench for America to survive

  107. 107
    Ksmiami says:

    @TenguPhule: so scaffolding it is then…

  108. 108
    Ksmiami says:

    @TenguPhule: no in front of his office building- would have a bigger effect – just ask Vlad the impaler

  109. 109
    Ksmiami says:

    @TenguPhule: @Nicole: no we just declare all republican appointees bull and void from Gorsuch on down and wipe them out

  110. 110
    Mart says:

    Yea but that woman was paid to give speeches to big bankers, so thank goodness we got Trump and crew instead! I just love how the R’s re-run various forms of this every two years; and always get the media and ordinary folks to buy in. No way around it, the Dems are the true crooks.

  111. 111
    J R in WV says:

    @Nicole:

    If we Dems ever get a solid 2/3rds majority in both houses, some corrupt judges should be impeached and have their pensions revoked. These guys who vote their Dominionist Christianist fascist philosophy rather than common law and common sense need to be yanked up straight.

    Money is free speech? Not when a few corrupt RWNJs have billions of dollars and the rest of us haven’t managed to steal that much!!

    Corporations are people? Then if someone dies due to a deliberate decision by the Corp. to not make the product safely, but to do it cheaply to maximize profit, the corporation needs to get the death penalty, their estate (all the money) goes to the heirs of the dead person. And I do mean the CEO, CxO etc. And his lawyers.

    Like Ford for Pintos, GM for ignition switches they knew didn’t work right, etc.

    Or, better, we get rid of judges and justices who make these corrupt and ill-considered decisions.

  112. 112
    NorthLeft12 says:

    @TenguPhule:

    I thought you’re supposed to make this sound like a bad thing.

    That was not really my intent.

Comments are closed.