Mississippi Intrigue

This whole mess gets weirder and weirder:

Attorney Mark Mayfield was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound Friday at his Ridgeland home.

Mayfield, vice chairman of the Mississippi Tea Party, and is one of the three men charged with conspiring with Clayton Kelly to photograph U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran’s bedridden wife in her nursing home and create a political video against Cochran.

DAILY LEDES: Madison County conservative activist remembers Mayfield

Ridgeland Police Department responded to Mayfield’s home to investigate the shooting.

Wonder how long before the nutters go all Vince Foster on Cochran?

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260 replies
  1. 1
    🌷 Martin says:

    Won’t happen. White male conservatives don’t get that treatment.

  2. 2
    aangus says:

    “Wonder how long before the nutters go all Vince Foster on Cochran?”

    Already started, I’m sure.

    1Edit. Well, Martin and I have set the limits for this discussion, have fun filling in the middle ground. : )

  3. 3
    catclub says:

    can I just refer to my post in the previous thread – which was an open thread.
    Rather than rile up FYWP.

  4. 4
    Skippy-san says:

    Let the conspiracy theories begin!

  5. 5
    Mnemosyne says:

    @🌷 Martin:

    The MSM won’t do it, but it sounds like some of Mayfield’s Tea Party buddies are already claiming it was a conspiracy.

  6. 6
    catclub says:

    @aangus: There are people saying that a)Cochran is done and b)I ain’t voting for him.

    But I have my doubts there are enough to actually throw the vote in November. We live in hope.
    I guess I will put up signs to “Write in McDaniel”

  7. 7
    C.V. Danes says:

    Not to sound cold-hearted, but isn’t this just the free market at work?

  8. 8
    MattF says:

    Given Soonergrunt’s report of a body-double representing an OK district, it looks like the weird is in full bloom. I just want to know– why a body-double and not an alien? And was anyone abducted and ‘probed’?

  9. 9
    D58826 says:

    Only vaguely OT, but since its June Obama can’t be waging war on Christmas, so this will have to do until then

    Member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee joins Rob to discuss his amendment and now Senator Mike Lee’s efforts to stop HUD and the White House from using the Fair Housing Act to wage a “war on the suburbs.”

    It must be exhausting to be a true murkin patriot

  10. 10
    Paul in KY says:

    It’s obvious Hillary had it done. Only logical conclusion.

  11. 11
    CONGRATULATIONS! says:

    Tip of the iceberg, I’m thinking. Guy doesn’t shoot himself over what, at best, would be a misdemeanor offense. Something a lot bigger and nastier going on.

  12. 12
    NonyNony says:

    @catclub:

    But I have my doubts there are enough to actually throw the vote in November. We live in hope.
    I guess I will put up signs to “Write in McDaniel”

    How’s the Democratic candidate (Childers)? Does he have a shot in hell of leveraging “REPUBLICANS IN DISARRAY” into a GOTV for himself? Or would the conservatives have to basically destroy themselves completely before he has a shot of getting the seat?

  13. 13
    OzarkHillbilly says:

    I blame Obama.

  14. 14
    catclub says:

    From the article:

    “That’s not true,” Sanders said when asked if SWAT team members were sent to arrest Mayfield last month when he was charged with conspiracy in the Cochran photo case. “We did not send members of the SWAT team to arrest Mr. Mayfield. Investigators went to his business.”

    So he could have said: “We only do that for certain other offenders, not white lawyers.”

  15. 15
    a hip hop artist from Idaho (fka Bella Q) says:

    @CONGRATULATIONS!: The bigger and nastier may be an undiagnosed or untreated brain disorder (often called mental illness) which got very critical after his arrest.

  16. 16
    NonyNony says:

    @CONGRATULATIONS!:

    Tip of the iceberg, I’m thinking. Guy doesn’t shoot himself over what, at best, would be a misdemeanor offense. Something a lot bigger and nastier going on.

    Disagree. Suicide is rarely a rational action – it usually points to some severe problems that aren’t clear until everyone puts their individual pieces together after the fact to try to make some sense about why their friend/family member did it. Sometimes there are even diagnosed medical issues that only a handful of people even know about since mental illness is such a taboo subject in our society.

    (I’ve lived through this a few times in my life now – my heart goes out to his family because it’s a really, really bad thing to go through.)

  17. 17
    dmsilev says:

    @🌷 Martin: Of course not. It was obviously Obama’s fault, to distract from Benghazi.

  18. 18
    catclub says:

    @NonyNony: I assume Cochran won with over 70% of the vote last time, while spending just enough to get his name on the ballot. Ran far better than McCain, too.

    So only if McDaniel runs third party will Childers ( deeply conservative Mississippi democrat) have a shot.

    OTOH McDaniel had a history of gaffes ready made as a radio talk show host, plus his various visits to the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Akin, Mourdock territory. Instead, any potential money to Childers, to make it a real race, will never appear.

  19. 19
    Snarki, child of Loki says:

    Just wait ’till the Teabuggers find out that it was Vince Foster that actually pulled the trigger on Mayfield. The truth is out there! In Benghazi!!!

  20. 20
    D58826 says:

    @dmsilev: No No No, you’ve lost the threat. This was done to distract from the World Cup, which was to distract from Iraq, which was done to distract from Bergdahl. AND THAT was done to distract from Benghazi!!!!!:-)

  21. 21
    catclub says:

    @Snarki, child of Loki: The gun he used was involved in Fast and Furious.

  22. 22
    Roger Moore says:

    @CONGRATULATIONS!:

    Guy doesn’t shoot himself over what, at best, would be a misdemeanor offense.

    Unless he were already depressed and suicidal. Somebody who was already considering suicide might be pushed over the edge by something that the rest of us would be able to brush off.

  23. 23
    Mike in NC says:

    Ridgeland Police Department needs to round up all the black and Hispanic people in town for questioning.

  24. 24
    kindness says:

    Mayfield = Vince Foster???

    HILLARY DID IT!!!!111!!

  25. 25
    Elizabelle says:

    They’re ALWAYS the victims. From the accompanying link:

    Mark Mayfield’s death is tragic in and of itself, but it also provides a sobering, painful and chilling reminder that the race for U.S. Senate from Mississippi went far off the rails.

    I talked with Pat Bruce, president of the Madison County Conservative Coalition … As we talked, she oscillated between hurt and anger and disbelief. Then there were moments of lucidity [!] ….

    “They killed him,” she said in a raised voice full of pain. “They sent a SWAT team to his office, six officers, just to arrest him.”

    Yup. The government killed this fine Tea Partying lawyer.

    Bruce knows Mayfield committed suicide this morning [and, inconveniently, not when the jack-booted thugs showed a few weeks ago], but she shares a broadly held rage at the way the Madison Police Department brought Mayfield into custody.

    … Mayfield remained locked in a world of uncertainty and fear. The day after his arrest, he started losing clients, including three banks that were large clients … The ordeal destroyed him, Bruce and others said.

    “Politics has gone too far. I’m just outraged,” Bruce said … She — like others — have lashed out at the campaign of U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, some pointing to the television ads that ran with the faces of Mayfield and others charged in the nursing home conspiracy. That was too much, too personal of an attack on those individuals who remain innocent until proven guilty.

    “I’m just crushed,” Bruce said after a long pause. “Mark’s death just kind of puts and exclamation point on how out of control this has all gotten.”

    It were politics that killed this man. And big government. And Thad Cochran.

    It was not his own actions, and own desperate final act.

    Linky: http://www.clarionledger.com/s...../11484789/

  26. 26
    dmsilev says:

    @D58826: Remind me again what Benghazi was supposed to be a distraction from. The birth certificate?

  27. 27

    Wonder how long before the nutters go all Vince Foster on Cochran?

    Literally two minutes.

  28. 28
    catclub says:

    @Roger Moore: Also, fairly sure there was felony conspiracy involved, not misdemeanor.

    The only crooks Mississippi courts are likely to be soft on are/were Worldcom Executives.

  29. 29
    Tripod says:

    @D58826:

    Fear of a black planet.

  30. 30
    Elizabelle says:

    @dmsilev:

    The fact that a Democrat was elected to the White House.

    Twice.

  31. 31
    mdblanche says:

    @🌷 Martin: But Cochran isn’t a conservative. He gedolchstossed conservatives in the back by getting all the liberals and the blacks to vote for him. No doubt they feel a man capable of that is capable of anything.

  32. 32
    catclub says:

    @Elizabelle:

    It were politics that killed this man. And big government. And Thad Cochran.

    Ever see “The Tall Guy” with Jeff Goldblum? He plays in a musical version of the Elephant Man.

    Lyric on his death: “Somewhere, up in heaven, there’s an angel with big ears.”

  33. 33
    Elizabelle says:

    @catclub:

    Nope, not yet.

    The NYTimes opened their story to reader comments. That should be interesting. (At least the Times moderates, so it won’t be the sh*tfest you’d see elsewhere.)

  34. 34
    NCSteve says:

    It’s Mississippi. It’s extremist right wing Klan-symp politics in Mississippi. It’s a guy who was actually caught committing a crime related to the political campaign of an extremist right wing Klan-symp neo-Confederate nutbatter in Mississfuckingsippi.

    I really don’t think it’s over the top to question whether it is, in fact, suicide at this point. Because, unlike Vince Foster, there were people who actually had real motives here.

  35. 35
    ShadeTail says:

    @dmsilev:

    Remind me again what Benghazi was supposed to be a distraction from. The birth certificate?

    No, from the fact that Mitt Romney was, at the time, cruising to an easy win in the 2012 election. Remember, the polls were skewed.

  36. 36
    mdblanche says:

    @Snarki, child of Loki: But where do the reverse vampires fit into all this?

  37. 37
    Mr. Longform says:

    @catclub:

    Ever see “The Tall Guy” with Jeff Goldblum?

    which has the funniest sex scene ever w/ Goldblum and early Emma Thompson!

  38. 38
    Elizabelle says:

    WaPost:

    Mayfield, Sager, and Mary were arrested soon after [on May 22] on charges of conspiracy. Mayfield’s bond was set at $250,000. Kelly’s attorney told the media that his client didn’t recognize the other three men when they joined him in his holding cell. Mayfield’s attorney had harsh words for the court. “It all shocks me,” he said. “I don’t understand the charge. It makes no sense whatsoever, just like a $250,000 bond makes no sense for someone who is literally a pillar in the community.”

    A veritable stool of conservatism. (TM)

    Mayfield was a real estate lawyer in his community and was the vice president of the Central Mississippi Tea Party at the time of his arrest.

    Maybe he saw what was coming with climate change. A la North Carolina (no scientific studies of our beaches here; t’aint right).

  39. 39
    drkrick says:

    “Politics has gone too far. I’m just outraged,” Bruce said … She — like others — have lashed out at the campaign of U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran, some pointing to the television ads that ran with the faces of Mayfield and others charged in the nursing home conspiracy. That was too much, too personal of an attack on those individuals who remain innocent until proven guilty.

    Taking pictures of an opponent’s ill wife in a nursing home, on the other hand, is just politics as usual. These people and their entitlement.

  40. 40

    @Elizabelle:

    Well, it kinda was politics that killed him. If not for politics, he wouldn’t have thought it was a good idea to participate in a felony to score points against a political opponent.

  41. 41
    catclub says:

    @Mr. Longform: agreed

  42. 42
    D58826 says:

    @dmsilev: Benghazi was a distraction from the IRS, which was a distraction from fast and furious which was a distraction from the birth certificate which was a distraction from the n-clang in the white house! knew I missed one in there somewhere

  43. 43
    Elizabelle says:

    @drkrick:

    I know. Back asswards.

  44. 44
    MomSense says:

    Wow, did anyone read the press release from Timothy Ray Murray, human, born in Oklahoma?!

    I think this dude’s been drinking the fracking fluid.

  45. 45
    Culture of Truth says:

    But if you go full Vince Foster, one his close friends killed him to shut him up.

  46. 46
    Elizabelle says:

    @Mr. Longform:
    @catclub:

    Well now that’s sounding more appealing.

    Jeff Goldblum has been good in anything I’ve ever seen him in. Even as the crazy scientist in some cats vs. dogs movie. (Which my young nephew rated as the “best movie ever” at the time.)

  47. 47
    aimai says:

    @NonyNony: I disagree–social shame is a very strong factor in some suicides. A person who is a lawyer, who has a public position, and who suddenly (as they see it) is about to lose their public and respected position and face scrutiny and embarrassment is quite likely to take their own life.

  48. 48
    Culture of Truth says:

    It’s gettin so a man can’t even committ a crime anymore without bein criticized. Politics has gone too far I tell ya.

  49. 49
    scav says:

    Loons, especially differently balenced loons, living in bubbles probably develop entirely unrealistic expectations of how they will be greeted as liberators when they make their mad dash to execute political PR master coups à la Candid Camera or shoot up BLM officers and expect to spawn the inevitable mass-revolution to follow. Case two usually includes suicide as a part of the dramatic moment. This guy might have just figured out the expected ticker-tape end game wasn’t coming and there would be consequences in the non-bubble landscape. And went for the next similarly thought-out step. In a movement increasingly peopled, planned and executed by unstable loons in bubbles, why are we expecting rational responses?

  50. 50
    Culture of Truth says:

    Mayfield’s attorney had harsh words for the court. “It all shocks me,”

    Oh well never mind then

    “a $250,000 bond makes no sense for someone who is literally a pillar in the community.”

    atlas shrugged

  51. 51
    Comrade Dread says:

    Senator Mike Lee’s efforts to stop HUD and the White House from using the Fair Housing Act to wage a “war on the suburbs.”

    I think that there is what’s known as a dog air raid siren.

  52. 52
    D58826 says:

    @Elizabelle: Funny how the tea party types didn’t mind slandering Bergdahl.

  53. 53
    Morzer says:

    @Elizabelle:

    A lawyer and a teabagger? That’s a combination that really dials up the despicable.

  54. 54
    Citizen_X says:

    @drkrick:

    “Politics has gone too far. I’m just outraged,” Bruce said

    How DARE they arrest him for committing a crime!

  55. 55
    gbear says:

    @D58826: Where do I sign up for the war on suburbs? This is something I can get behind.

  56. 56

    @mdblanche: a quick check of Google seems to indicate that you are the first person ever to use the word “gedolchstossed”. Since the internet is not mine to award, I instead bestow upon you mad props.

  57. 57
    susie says:

    You asked how long it will be before the Vince Foster stuff starts. Here you go, from World Net Daily.

    Christian1897 • an hour ago

    The “suicide” of one of the leaders of the tea party in Mississippi reminds me of the Clinton era when so many people opposed to Clinton, or trying to investigate Clinton, mysteriously jumped from windows or otherwise committed “suicide”. Lets face it folks, the leadership in Washington DC is Communist and Communists believe that “the end justifies the means” and will do anything no matter how evil, immoral, or amoral, to further their Communist agenda. And that includes murder.
    This “suicide” needs to be investigated from top to bottom. When you are dealing with Communists you are dealing with murderers. They have murdered millions upon millions people in every nation they have ever controlled so the murder of one person means nothing to them. This also reminds me of the death recently of newsmen who were about to publish certain information on Obama.
    The battle in Mississippi against A RINO Senator may explain the “suicide”. The election there was full of filthy dirty tricks by the left wing against the tea party candidate. Stand up patriots of Mississippi and see to it that this “suicide” is truly investigated because this is just like something the Communists would do to eliminate an opponent. The more power the Communists get, the more this kind of thing will happen.

    7

    Reply

    Share ›

  58. 58
    Citizen_X says:

    @scav:

    Loons, especially differently balenced loons, living in bubbles probably develop entirely unrealistic expectations of how they will be greeted as liberators

    Good point, but unfortunately the crushing shame you describe hasn’t applied to the original author of that last phrase.

  59. 59
    gbear says:

    @Elizabelle: If you pick the ‘Reader’s Choice’ for comments at the NYT, almost all of the stupid comments are filtered out and they become very readable.

  60. 60
    raven says:

    @susie: Who cares? Every kind of fucking nutbag writes shit in the “comments” section. Fuck em.

  61. 61
    scav says:

    @Citizen_X: They’re not loons: they’re manipulative sociopathic vultures, only without the redeeming qualities of the feathered ones.

  62. 62
    max says:

    @dmsilev: Remind me again what Benghazi was supposed to be a distraction from. The birth certificate?

    This is just a distraction from the vote-stealing conspiracy by the GOP establishment and the Democrats, which was a distraction from Hillary’s book tour which was a distraction from the Feds stealing Bundy’s cows which was a distraction from BENGHAZI! which was a distraction from Romney winning, which was a distraction from the bad economy which was a distraction from Obama unconstitutionally signing a debt limit increase which John Boehner helped pass to sell out the base, which was a distraction from gutting all that money going to the darkies, which was a distraction from DEATH PANELS! which was a distraction from TARP, which was a distraction to divert attention from the fact that John McCain won, which was a distraction from the fact that McCain is a MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE who was only in the race to HELP OBAMA WIN because Obama was originally conceived in BENGHAZI by a communist traitor and a black Kenyan in a plot to distract the American people from RONALDUS MAGNUS preventing the IMMINENT SOVIET TAKEOVER which was imminent because FDR sold out the Real Americans by fighting their true friend, Adolf Hitler, because FDR destroyed capitalism (which FDR succeeded at because the Germans were driven out of BENGHAZI! in 1942!).

    I think that’s it, anyways. Close enough.

    max
    [‘Six Three degrees of BENGHAZI!’]

  63. 63
    Mike in NC says:

    @Morzer:

    I’d guess that 3/4 of elected Republicans in the South — state and national level — are teabagger lawyers. Which explains why they’re obsessed with punishing Welfare Queens and prohibiting Sharia Law.

  64. 64
    Temporarily Max McGee (soon enough to be Andy K again) says:

    Peaked wingnut?

  65. 65
    Elizabelle says:

    @gbear:

    Yes. I love that feature. It’s like sitting in the “no smoking” section.

    Although sometimes a little rarified.

  66. 66
    RareSanity says:

    @susie:

    Wow, that took some extreme acrobatics of logic to find a way to blame Obama for the suicide of a Tea Party leader, in a state that’s basically a wasteland for the Democratic Party…but there you have it.

    ETA: Didn’t know that it came from a comment on an article…I don’t wanna start nutpicking, but that’s still some impressive reaching.

  67. 67
    raven says:

    @RareSanity: Some weird stuff with Recardo.

  68. 68
    RareSanity says:

    @raven:

    Being the cynic I am, I rarely hear a news story that just disturbs me, but when I heard about that one…

    It just sounds like something out of a movie…

  69. 69
    Elizabelle says:

    @susie:

    The battle in Mississippi against A RINO Senator may explain the “suicide”. The election there was full of filthy dirty tricks by the left wing against the tea party candidate.

    Projection, thy name is Christian 1897.

    This attorney committed suicide over the ordeal he brought upon himself by allegedly participating in a political dirty trick. He was arrested, lost clients, and fell into despair.

    Because he was charged with conspiring to photograph a nursing home patient who suffered from dementia.

    And, if memory serves, wasn’t the point behind photographing Thad Cochran’s wife with dementia the chance to attack him for possibly stepping out on his marriage with a staffer or associate?

  70. 70
    Belafon says:

    @D58826: Missing links! I bet you believe in evolution!

  71. 71
    🌷 Martin says:

    @mdblanche: That is a good point. If Cochran could treat blacks as something other than election thieves, then indeed he’s capable of anything.

  72. 72
    raven says:

    @RareSanity: Yea, strange days.

  73. 73
    SatanicPanic says:

    @Elizabelle: I guess it would be kind of embarrassing to be arrested for that, but most of us would have considered that before breaking into a nursing home

  74. 74
    Patricia Kayden says:

    @Elizabelle: So hold on. Mayfield committed a crime (or what could be considered a crime) by sneaking into a hospital room and photographing Cochran’s dying wife without her (or her family’s) permission. But somehow, he is the victim? Not Cochran or Cochran’s wife, but Mayfield?

    Got it.

  75. 75
    Xantar says:

    @Culture of Truth:

    Extra demerits for using “literally” incorrectly.

    Yes, I know it has become common in some circles for the word to be a mere signifier of emphasis, but it’s wrong, damnit!

  76. 76
    SpotWeld says:

    The real countdown is how long until G. Gordon Liddy is on Fox stating how if he were called into to do the job, this is exactly how he would have made it look.

  77. 77
    NotMax says:

    @raven

    Been meaning to ask if you’ve seen or heard or become aware of any particular special or local preparations or pushback for the first day of the ‘walk like a mercenary’ law kicking in on July 1?

  78. 78
    Patrick says:

    @susie:

    Lets face it folks, the leadership in Washington DC is Communist and Communists believe that “the end justifies the means” and will do anything no matter how evil, immoral, or amoral, to further their Communist agenda. And that includes murder.

    So Boehner, Reid and Obama are all Communists? Wow! The definition of the word Communist sure has changed since I went to school…

  79. 79
    Patricia Kayden says:

    @dmsilev: Ha! We don’t know anymore. It’s all got way too confusing.

  80. 80
    Glocksman says:

    I’ve considered suicide in the past, to the point of staring down the barrel of a loaded .357 Magnum because of a multitude of issues that included alcoholism, debt, depression, and loneliness.

    I lowered that gun because the counseling I’d had reminded me that suicide in the end is the ultimate act of selfishness and merely says ‘fuck you’ to those you love and who love you.

    I still struggle with alcohol every day and my illness is one of the reasons I no longer own a firearm other than a .22 rifle that holds sentimental value from my childhood.

    For Mr. Mayfield’s sake, I hope that the Christian religion is wrong and he doesn’t automatically wind up in hell for that act.
    He may or may not deserve to end up there because of other things he’s done, but I can understand the combination of circumstances that leads one to believe that a permanent solution to temporary problems is the answer you’re looking for.

  81. 81
    srv says:

    @susie: I personally consider it a failing of Obama that he doesn’t provoke more wingnuts jumping out of windows.

    If Hillary had been elected, we’d have had a lot less trouble.

    Plus, her black helicopters are silent now.

  82. 82
    🌷 Martin says:

    @MomSense: I used to play that game with my daughter. I asserted that she was a robot I built in my spare time and challenged her to prove me wrong. It was fun when she was 7. She finally figured out that the game was rigged and that it was on me to prove that she was a robot.

    But we may be bumping into a new phenomenon here.

    It’s not really worth rebutting these articles individually, because that’s beside the central point. What I find to be an interesting question is: Why do we want to distribute stupid content to our friends and networks precisely because we find them so mind-bogglingly stupid? What is it that makes stupid content so difficult to resist?

    My working theory is that it’s the modern, social media equivalent of daytime television for educated types. It’s somehow rooted in our vanity. Reading and mocking stupid content on the Internet makes us feel that much smarter.

    We’re creating a market for people that accuse others of being a robot, and for the people that write about them.

  83. 83
    raven says:

    @Glocksman: I thought that was just catholics?

  84. 84
    Glocksman says:

    @raven:

    I was brought up as a Catholic.
    Other Christian beliefs I really have no knowledge about.

  85. 85
    Elizabelle says:

    @Glocksman:

    Compassionate comment.

  86. 86
    a hip hop artist from Idaho (fka Bella Q) says:

    O/T, but this will not end well. That’s not a neighborhood you want to start a ruckus in. It’s quite divided, and historically, some of the city’s more volatile “finest” were assigned to District 3. That may have changed now; when I was in the business, the bigger divide was the lower class Appalachians who resented that the middle class west side Catholic folks looked down on them. Now it’s more diverse, so it’s altogether possible that the higher strung police are placed elsewhere.

  87. 87
    Patricia Kayden says:

    @Culture of Truth: You should have clarified that things have gotten so bad that a WHITE man cannot commit a little bitty crime without all this fussiness. Black and Brown men have been getting clobbered by the justice system forever.

  88. 88
    NotMax says:

    @srv

    If Hillary had been elected, we’d have had a lot less trouble.
     
    Plus, her black helicopters are silent now.

    Except for that time every month when they raise such a racket…

    /alternate would winguttery

  89. 89

    @max:

    I think that’s it, anyways [sic]. Close enough.

    That’s all we need, including the misuse of English. [Pro tip: ‘Anyway’ is agreed to be a word.] Perfect. You nailed it.

  90. 90
    NotMax says:

    @NotMax

    alternate world

    (Darn you, no edit.)

  91. 91
    Patricia Kayden says:

    @susie: “This also reminds me of the death recently of newsmen who were about to publish certain information on Obama.”

    Which “newsmen” are we talking about? And what was the “certain information”?

    The plot thickens.

  92. 92
    Amir Khalid says:

    @mdblanche:
    Nein, nein, nein. Das Wort “gedolchstossed” gibt es nicht. Man sagt: Er hat den Konservativen die Rücken mit einem Dolch gestoßen.

  93. 93
    Enhanced Voting Techniques says:

    @susie: So Obama and Hilary were helping their buds in the Mississippi GOP, awesome.

  94. 94
    Elizabelle says:

    WaPost reader comment by MET9:

    To all of the African American voters in Mississippi:

    it appears that exercising your right to vote is just way to much for the “keep them away from the polls” crowd. I suggest that you participate more in the elections in your state and enjoy watching that crowd do away with itself. Political suicide just was not enough for this one.

  95. 95
    Glocksman says:

    @Amir Khalid:

    Heh.

    Even this hick gets the reference.
    What’s next, the Goering quote about culture and reaching for his Browning?

  96. 96
    Roger Moore says:

    @Patricia Kayden:

    But somehow, he is the victim?

    They’re always the victim. Even when they’re winning, they’re the victim by not having a larger margin of victory.

  97. 97
    RareSanity says:

    @raven:

    It’s pretty common across all Christian dominations.

    I don’t quite know the bible verses offhand, but the philosophy behind it, which I wish more “Christians” (mostly the conservative ones) would follow, is that a man (meaning mankind) has no right to decide to take a life, even if it is one’s own.

    Life is a gift from God, it is not for a man to decide when that gift should be taken away.

  98. 98
    catclub says:

    @Patricia Kayden: Mayfield was never in the room. But he apparently encouraged the guy who was in the room. Plus not really breaking in, more likely walking into a room in a nursing home where he was not invited to be.

  99. 99
    Enhanced Voting Techniques says:

    @SpotWeld:

    The real countdown is how long until G. Gordon Liddy is on Fox stating how if he were called into to do the job, this is exactly how he would have made it look.

    If Liddy had been the assassin, he would have shot himself in the head and Mayfield would still be alive.

  100. 100
    Iowa Old Lady says:

    In the meantime, McDaniel is claiming his people have found more then 1000 invalid voters so far.

    I don’t suppose he thinks they voted for him.

  101. 101
    max says:

    @PhoenixRising: [Pro tip: ‘Anyway’ is agreed to be a word.]

    Heh. I like ‘anyways’ and also ‘I done did that already’ and ‘I’m fixin’ to do that’. Total mangling of the Queen’s English of course, but the Queen ain’t around to complain.

    That’s all we need, including the misuse of English. Perfect. You nailed it.

    I left out the exclamation point of the middle BENGHAZI!. But thanks! I suppose reading the Dallas Morning News Op-Ed pages for 30 years plus various ancient (and not ancient) right-wingers has its rewards.

    max
    [‘OK. Reward. Singular.’]

  102. 102
    Glocksman says:

    @RareSanity:

    Exactly.

    While I’m enough of a lapsed Catholic to the point my opposition to the death penalty is practical instead of moral and don’t oppose abortion, I do respect the members of Catholic orders who are consistent in opposing both abortion and the death penalty.

    Those who oppose abortion while favoring the death penalty and immoral wars on the other hand….

  103. 103
    Amir Khalid says:

    @Glocksman:
    I got the reference too, naturally. I was just being a Grammatiknazi.

  104. 104
    Roger Moore says:

    @Enhanced Voting Techniques:

    So Obama and Hilary were helping their buds in the Mississippi GOP, awesome.

    Now Thad Cochran owes Obama and Hillary big time, so he’ll do whatever they tell him. Obama is an evil mastermind, except when he’s being too dumb to walk and chew gum at the same time.

  105. 105
    Morzer says:

    @mdblanche:

    He took them to Galt’s Dolch.

  106. 106
    Glocksman says:

    @Amir Khalid:

    I like it.
    I hope you don’t mind if I use that word in the future.

    Anyway, I was just showing off my erudition about Hitler and his rise to power.
    Please continue.

  107. 107
    catclub says:

    @Iowa Old Lady:

    In the meantime, McDaniel is claiming his people have found more then 1000 invalid voters so far

    It should be absurdly easy to do, if one has the records from both elections. When you signed on June 3 in they write ‘voted’ by your name in either the Democratic or GOP list. IN PRINCIPLE, they should check on June 24th that you did not sign in on the Democratic list on June 3. But if they did not do this, there could be many who voted wrongly.

    I noticed in reports on June 24 that a guy was turned away because he had voted on June 3 in the Democratic primary. People who vote are the most likely to get to vote again.

    …. oh, I see your point. If the ballot is secret, no one know who that person voted for, so which of the total tally is marked out. I think if there enough cases like this to come to the difference between Cochran’s and McDaniel’s total votes, he has reasonable doubt to take it to court, without actually knowing.

  108. 108
    RareSanity says:

    @Glocksman:

    Exactly.

    If there were more consistency in the whole “right to life” crowd, then I could actually accept it as a valid philosophy.

    However, since the are holes in their logic big enough to drive a tank through, I can safely ignore most of their ramblings.

  109. 109
    David Koch says:

    This is Obama’s fault.

    He obviously killed himself over telephone metadata

  110. 110
    MikeJ says:

    Wonder how long before the nutters go all Vince Foster on Cochran?

    It’s soon going to look like the SS v the SA.

  111. 111
    Bill Arnold says:

    @Elizabelle:

    The fact that a Democrat was elected to the White House.
    Twice.

    You’re forgetting the armadas of out-of-state buses full of dead non-white voters.

  112. 112
    David Koch says:

    @catclub: it’s a scam. they have to put out bait in order to lure supporters suckers into sending in part of their evil government check cuz hiring staff and lawyers to play make-believe Matlock costs other people's money.

  113. 113
    scav says:

    What we clearly need is a zone, a protected zone around these accused people, shielding them from unwanted personal attention and others meddling in their private lives. All this hounding and public accusations and questioning of motives!? How dare people? People are innocent until proven guilty and should be protected, although not apparently when performing actually entirely legal actions you just happen to personally disapprove of. Then you get in their grill and hound them. In packs.

  114. 114
    Anoniminous says:

    @Amir Khalid:

    The Soccer God speaks German!

    All is explained.

  115. 115
    Amir Khalid says:

    I’ve been following this story since it was first mentioned here; every time I think it can’t get any crazier, it does. I’m starting to suspect this whole thing is being orchestrated by Mel Brooks.

  116. 116
    mdblanche says:

    @Amir Khalid: Um, if you say so. I’m pretty sure your German is a lot better than mine.

  117. 117
    MattR says:

    @David Koch:

    He obviously killed himself over telephone metadata

    I know you’re snarking but that reminds me of a question I wanted to ask those who know more about the law than I. Was the recent SCOTUS decision regarding warantless searches of cell phones any kind of indication that they would rule NSA collection of email metadata was unconsitutional? If a cell phone search is significantly more intrusive search than looking through someone’s briefcase, is it a stretch that they would rule that collecting email metadata is similarly more intrusive than viewing that type of data for calls from a landline phone?

  118. 118
    raven says:

    @RareSanity: Huh, well I don’t know shit a bout soccer OR christian stuff. They gave us a pass when it was charlie I guess.

  119. 119
    Trollhattan says:

    @Mike in NC:
    I was shocked to hear there was gambling going on in that establishment.

  120. 120
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    “This is an election, but an election shouldn’t cost a life,” said Grant Sowell, leader of the Tupelo Tea Party, who was informed of the suicide on Friday morning. “It just breaks my heart. He was a good man.”

    Um, no.

    It is not possible to be a teabagger and to be “a good man” at the same time. These are inherent contradictions. Teabaggers are racist scum. All of them.

  121. 121
    WereBear says:

    And to think we haven’t hit peak wingnut yet. Because, you know. Mississippi.

  122. 122
    divF says:

    @Elizabelle:
    “Earth Girls Are Easy”: Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis, Damon Wayons Jim Carrey – Science-Fiction Farce in 80’s West LA.

  123. 123
    Patrick says:

    @scav:

    I don’t get the concern for the first amendment. These “Christian” protesters are still allowed to write a letter to the editor and what have you. But at the point where their free speech feels like intimidation and threat, it doesn’t have anything to do with free speech anymore. It’s getting to the yelling fire in a packed house argument.

  124. 124
    Elizabelle says:

    This was a suicide FAIL in that you don’t want to leave people laughing at reactions to your demise.

    (Truly, it is better to surround yourself with saner and better people in life, but then one would not be at such risk for suicide.) That said:

    From WaPost reader comments thread:

    ” was a fine Christian man who was always respectful and kind. He was one of the most polite and humble men I’ve ever met in politics. He was a loving husband, father, a pillar of his community,”
    Wow, If this is what passes for a pillar of the community what does that say about the community? Some of these Tea Partiers really do you have a screw loose.

    Just some? You are so kind.

    “Except for that whole photographing an old woman with dementia in some misguided attempt to do…something…we’re not sure, he’s a real upstanding fellow.”

    – Baggers

    Remember…this is Mississippi. The standards for pillars is very low.

  125. 125
    D58826 says:

    @Belafon: Well I’m not sure about evolution but we do seem to be witnessing de-evolution among the right wing

  126. 126
    Glocksman says:

    @mdblanche:

    Mine as well.
    I remember a bit from the 2 years I learned in high school, but the phrases that stood out in my mind are the political.
    Luckily for me, my German teacher didn’t faint straight away when I asked her about the accuracy of certain terms from the Order of the Death’s Head and told me that the translator was British, and that some terms didn’t translate directly into US English.

    Hence ‘Browning’ instead of pistol, to cite one example.

  127. 127
    WereBear says:

    @D58826: They are not men they are Devo.

  128. 128
    Baud says:

    @MattR:

    I don’t see a legal connection. One can speculate about the effects of changing attitudes given modern technology and non-white presidents.

  129. 129
    Morzer says:

    @WereBear:

    I think we could use the fine old English word “cudlips” here.

  130. 130
    WereBear says:

    @Morzer: Truly.

    The end game of Authoritarian thrall; collapse of the world they merely thought they knew.

  131. 131
    Ash Can says:

    @Glocksman: The Catholic Church no longer takes a hard line on suicide. The teaching is that if the person is incapable of thinking clearly and understanding the wrong he or she is doing by taking his/her own life — which is pretty much a given in the case of suicide — then there’s no condemnation.

  132. 132
    Belafon says:

    @MattR: Not real sure, but I don’t really see this ruling directly impacting the other decision. Assuming that all they are collecting is phone numbers, those are not “inside the phone.” The original bases for this is that law enforcement has had the right for years to collect this stuff for landlines.

  133. 133
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @MattF: Late to the thread, but why would body double necessarily exclude alien?

  134. 134
    Belafon says:

    From Jonah Goldberg: Warren Can Beat Hillary in 2016.

    All I can say is “not if she doesn’t run.”

  135. 135
    Morzer says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Afternoon, Omnes. Little Boots was looking for you the other night. Seemed quite agitated by your absence.

  136. 136
    David Koch says:

    post shoulda been titled “Mississippi Burning”

  137. 137
    Trollhattan says:

    @Morzer:
    Say that thrice before a darkened mirror, and I’m outtahere.

  138. 138
    kc says:

    @CONGRATULATIONS!:

    He was facing a felony conspiracy charge, according to the article.

  139. 139
    Trollhattan says:

    @Morzer:

    Seemed quite agitated

    I believe that’s the only needed phrase.

  140. 140
    scav says:

    @Patrick: all I can think is the 2nd amendment absolutists want some of the other amendments to start racking up a body count so they feel they have cover. That or my pre-existing creepy feeling that they’re pushing absolute freedom of speech as the front edge of the absolute and unfettered freedom of money=speech, especially ¥£€$=politicalspeech goal.

  141. 141
    Trollhattan says:

    @gbear:
    We only declared war (wowah) on coal, the suburbs were just collateral damage.

  142. 142
    NotMax says:

    @Morzer

    Must have been a day with a ‘y’ in it.

  143. 143
    Morzer says:

    @NotMax:
    @Trollhattan:

    Is there a backstory of which I wot not? A passionate affair fallen to ash? An ancient friendship broken by a difference as to which team will win the world cup?

  144. 144
    David Koch says:

    @Mike in NC:

    Ridgeland Police Department needs to round up all the black and Hispanic people in town for questioning. the usual suspects

    /fixed

  145. 145
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @MattR:

    Was the recent SCOTUS decision regarding warantless searches of cell phones any kind of indication that they would rule NSA collection of email metadata was unconsitutional? If a cell phone search is significantly more intrusive search than looking through someone’s briefcase, is it a stretch that they would rule that collecting email metadata is similarly more intrusive than viewing that type of data for calls from a landline phone?

    I think that a valid (not necessarily winning) argument to that can be made. I would even agree with it.

  146. 146
    Amir Khalid says:

    @Morzer:
    I suspect that “quite agitated” is pretty much Caligula’s normal state. If there’s a story behind his obsession with Omnes, as far as I know he hasn’t shared it.

  147. 147
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Morzer: That happens a lot. It is one of the burdens I bear.

  148. 148
    David Koch says:

    This kinda sounds like Jess Smith’s “suicide” during Teapot Dome

  149. 149
    Morzer says:

    @Amir Khalid:

    It made for a somewhat unusual opening to that comment thread.

    So, how many goals are Chile going to wax the Brazilians by?

  150. 150
    Morzer says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Dare I ask how it all began?

  151. 151
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Amir Khalid: @Morzer: I really don’t know the source of it, except that it first appeared, to the best of my knowledge, in a late night music thread.

    ETA: Caligula also evinces the same behavior on occasion toward JGC and DougJ – I am not sure how, as a non-FPer , I “make the grade.”

  152. 152
    Baud says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    What are your other burdens?

  153. 153
    NotMax says:

    @Amir Khalid

    I suspect that “quite agitated” is pretty much Caligula’s normal state.

    Right, in both cases.

  154. 154
    Amir Khalid says:

    @Morzer:
    I never decide such things so far in advance.

  155. 155

    I just read this story where an Oklahoma Republican candidate for Congress who was primarying a longstanding incumbent has said he thinks his opponent is a body double.

    On his website:

    The election for U.S. House for Oklahoma’s 3rd District will be contested by the Candidate, Timothy Ray Murray. I will be stating that his votes are switched with Rep. Lucas votes, because it is widely known Rep. Frank D. Lucas is no longer alive and has been displayed by a look alike. Rep. Lucas’ look alike was depicted as sentenced on a white stage in southern Ukraine on or about Jan. 11, 2011.

    This is a situation similar to the Senators’ from Kentucky situation in the 2012 election. I am contesting that this matter has happen since his election was blocked, because of the U.S. Defense Department’s use of Mr. Murray’s DNA. To my knowledge, the U.S. Defense Department has not released to the public that information, as it is their confidential information about many people. Congress is likely wanting me to state that all my DNA used will not result in benefits to people I have never had relations with of a family nature. I have been bound to protect that information unless it causes harm to The People.

    What. The. Fuck.

    This guy is nuttier than a squirrel’s nest.

  156. 156
    Baud says:

    @Morzer:

    Heh. Initially read that as “holes.”

  157. 157
    Morzer says:

    @Baud:

    *cough* *blush*

    Our household has evolved a new gastronomical term. We now refer to pasta al dente as “chiellini”.

  158. 158
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Baud: Amongst my burdens are such things as stunningly good looks, abundant charm, and an inner tube on the rear tire of my bicycle that needs to be replaced before I ride tomorrow.

    ETA: On the plus side, I chose not pay an extra $25 for a lunch at the state bar convention where I could watch a point/counterpoint between Karl Rove and Robert Gibbs. No way I was voluntarily putting money in Rove’s greasy hands.

  159. 159
    Morzer says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    If you only had a holocaust cloak and a wheelbarrow, you’d be all set.

  160. 160
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Morzer: A wheelbarrow! I knew I shouldn’t have covered the damned albino with it.

  161. 161
    shelley says:

    @Southern Beale:
    How soon before he starts going on about our ‘precious bodily fluids.’

  162. 162
    Morzer says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    I wouldn’t pay much to hear Robert Gibbs’ views either. How depressing our Obama alumni seem.

    What is to be done?

  163. 163
    Morzer says:

    McDaniel has apparently issued a brief statement :

    Regardless of recent allegations made against his character, Mark Mayfield was a fine Christian man who was always respectful and kind. He was one of the most polite and humble men I’ve ever met in politics. He was a loving husband, father, a pillar of his community, and he will be missed. We are saddened by his loss, and we send our thoughts and prayers to his wife, his family and friends.

    I can only wonder how he would describe the sort of despicable sleaze who would voluntarily be part of sneaking into an old folks’ home to take pictures of a political opponent’s bedridden wife for political advantage.

  164. 164
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Patrick: It’s always projection with these creatures.

    Always.

  165. 165
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Southern Beale:

    This guy is nuttier than a squirrel’s nest.

    Or, as my late father (who was born and raised in the Ozarks of Arkansas) used to say, “nuttier than a tree full of young squirrels.”

  166. 166
    Morzer says:

    @Villago Delenda Est:

    “Movie theater” is the collective noun for teabaggers.

  167. 167
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Morzer:

    I can only wonder how he would describe the sort of despicable sleaze who would voluntarily be part of sneaking into an old folks’ home to take pictures of a political opponent’s bedridden wife for political advantage.

    I know! I know! As “a fine Christian man who was always respectful and kind ….”

  168. 168
    WaterGirl says:

    @aimai: Completely agree. I said the same thing on an earlier thread, only you said it better and with fewer words. (Nothing unusual about that!)

  169. 169
    Morzer says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    These people really are ROUS*es aren’t they?

    *Ratfuckers Of Unusual Squirreliness

  170. 170
    Botsplainer says:

    Regrettably, this sounds like just a routine lawyer suicide. Tea Party and political involvement was a symptom of professional and personal failure.

    It’s become all the rage among middle aged lawyers without a lot to show for their careers. State Bars aren’t real helpful, the market to garner clientele brutal, the judges generally heedless of personal pressures, and the clients cheap and resentful all too frequently.

    Dude’s last economic lifeline snapped, and with it, him.

  171. 171
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    I know! I know! As “a fine Christian man who was always respectful and kind ….”

    This is followed by the voice of Rod Serling announcing that you have, indeed, crossed over into the Teabagger Zone.

  172. 172
    satby says:

    @Glocksman: It’s not really Catholic doctrine any more, the concept now is that a soul in torment from mental illness was not responsible.

    And thanks for sharing Glocksman, that was brave as well as compassionate.

  173. 173
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Botsplainer: Well, not so routine in that he was a prominent political figure in his community and was involved in a despicable scandal involving someone who any normal political figure would deem out of bounds.

    The desperation of McDaniel and his henchmen is floating through the air so that even I, on the west coast, against the prevailing winds, can smell it.

  174. 174
    satby says:

    @satby: won’t let me edit. I wanted to say thanks Glocksman, sharing that was brave as well as compassionate.

  175. 175
    WaterGirl says:

    @Glocksman: I’m glad you’re still here!

  176. 176
    MattR says:

    Had to run out for a while so a belated thanks to all for the responses. I don’t necessarily expect intellectual consistency from members of the court, but my understanding of the decision is that they ruled that looking into a cell phone is an unconstitutional invasion while looking into a briefcase or bookbag was still acceptable because of the sheer quantity of information about the person’s life that is stored on the phone and can be gained by looking through it. If that is the case, then there also seems to be a similar difference in degree between the pen register being considered in the 60’s and the amount of information that can gained by collecting the metadata for everyone’s email, text and cell phone call. I don’t know where the courts would draw the line or how national security concerns might enter the picture when it comes to the NSA’s actions, but it seems like SCOTUS has at least acknowledged a need to rethink the 4th Amendment in light of recent technological changes. (I believe there was another semi-recent case where they ruled putting a GPS tracker on a car consituted a search and required a warrant)

  177. 177
    Helen says:

    @raven: I LOVE reading “fucking nutbags” in the comments. I always read comments at wingnut sites. All those wingnut tears make me hap hap happy!!

  178. 178
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @MattR: That is the line I would take if I were counsel for a plaintiff challenging warrantless metadata collection and use.

    ETA: Others reasonably can and probably will differ.

  179. 179
    Ash Can says:

    @Elizabelle:

    “…a $250,000 bond makes no sense for someone who is literally a pillar in the community.”

    Actually, I agree. How is a piece of masonry supposed to be able to fork over any cash at all?

  180. 180
    WaterGirl says:

    @Morzer: Let me guess… that was on a day ending in a “Y”?

    Edit: I swear I did not see the NotMax comment before I wrote this.

  181. 181
    WereBear says:

    @Botsplainer: It’s become all the rage among middle aged lawyers without a lot to show for their careers.

    Cripes. Had no idea it was an epidemic.

    Has a bit of personal resonance for me, since back in the day, I was pressured to go into journalism or law, testing well on both and told by authoritative sources that they were solid professions that weren’t going anywhere.

    Very ironic thinking now.

  182. 182
    Baud says:

    @MattR:

    Makes sense. The Supreme Court isn’t bound by its own precedent, despite what they say.

  183. 183
    WereBear says:

    @Glocksman: Glad you turned the situation around. Good you had that counseling!

  184. 184
    WaterGirl says:

    @Baud: I had no idea until this week that you are likely an attorney. How did I miss that? Are you on the BJ registered attorney’s list along with others like burnspbesq and Omnes, and I just missed it?

  185. 185
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @WereBear: I just came back from my state bar convention. At these things, it always gets mentioned the lawyers have the highest rate of depression of any profession and have double the national rate of alcohol and substance abuse. People who go into law tend to be ambitious achievers who are not accustomed to failing. Also, the profession tends to encourage people to push themselves and ignore their own health (both physical and mental). Pulling all-nighters while eating out of the vending machine in order to get ready for trial or finish a deal is seen as dedication by senior partners in firms. That culture gets absorbed. As a result, quite a few lawyers spend a lot of time at the end of the physical, mental, and emotional tethers. The practice of law as it currently works is very miserable for many lawyers.

  186. 186
    WaterGirl says:

    Booman is on a roll:

    Since most Americans cannot correctly tell you which parties control which houses of Congress, this whole accountability idea is pretty tough. I wish people could just scroll through the recent articles at Political Wire. Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) sneaks up on a fellow congressman to “photobomb” him. Rep. Andy Harris (R-MD) may have accidentally legalized marijuana in DC while attempting to oppose decriminalization. Republican members of the Virginia House of Delegates broke into Governor Terry McAuliffe’s office on a weekend to “deliver their budget.” Virginia Republicans bribed a Democratic senator into resigning his seat with promise of a job, cell phone, and a car. Mississippi Tea Party leader kills himself after getting into trouble for his participation in an illegal entry into a nursing home to film Sen. Thad Cochran’s (R-MS) demented wife. That doesn’t even get into the Republican who is accusing his primary opponent of being dead and impersonated by a body double or John Boehner’s announcement that he plans to sue the president for something he hasn’t decided on yet.

  187. 187
    Roger Moore says:

    @MattR:
    It’s not just about the quantity but also about the purpose of the search. The rule is that the police are allowed to check somebody who’s been arrested to make sure he isn’t carry anything that would cause problems (weapons or escape tools) and to protect any potential evidence that he might destroy. They have apparently stretched that a bit to let the police look through the contents of some things they have found (i.e. flipping through a book) but decided that once a cell phone has been identified as a phone it is no longer a potential weapon or escape device and there’s no justification for looking through it. I personally think they should extend that basic idea to other things found on the person (e.g. you can’t read papers once they’ve been identified as papers rather than weapons) but it’s really a completely different argument from the one about phone metadata.

  188. 188
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Roger Moore:

    I personally think they should extend that basic idea to other things found on the person (e.g. you can’t read papers once they’ve been identified as papers rather than weapons)

    I completely agree with this. I do think the fact that far more information is contained in metadata than in pin registries should change the argument, but then I am looking for arguments to make on that side rather than dispassionately analyzing.

  189. 189
    Glocksman says:

    @satby:

    Not brave at all.
    Part of the recovery process is admitting to others that you have a problem with alcohol.

    If I were brave I would have admitted it before now, but the suicide drama of Mr. Mayfield just hit too close to home for me.
    I wouldn’t dream of doing what he was implicated in, but suicide is rarely the answer to life’s problems.

  190. 190
    Helen says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Also, lawyers must see just the dregs of the dregs. People come to you for a reason; they have been wronged. Or they have been the victim of a crime. There’s not a long walk to “all humanity sucks” if that’s all you see.

    Really who calls a lawyer when they’re happy and satisfied?

  191. 191
    Corner Stone says:

    @Roger Moore:

    but it’s really a completely different argument from the one about phone metadata.

    If SCOTUS determined authority can not look at your phone after you’re in custody to see who you’ve called , then what’s the rational argument to say authority has the right to look at who you’ve called when they have no idea who you even are?

  192. 192
    Helen says:

    @Patrick: I’ll bet a million bucks that that person has no clue who “the leadership” is. He/she has no clue how our government works, and cannot, under penalty of death, name his or her congressperson.

  193. 193
    Baud says:

    @WaterGirl:

    That’s like comparing John Marshall and Oliver Wendell Holmes to Lionel Hutz.

  194. 194
    David Koch says:

    @Roger Moore: As usual, they’re illogical. If you arrest someone and find a notebook or address book or wallet in the person’s pocket you can go through it, but if you find a phone, you can’t. Now they’ll want to distinguish it by saying a phone stores more information, but that’s a disquisition without a difference.

  195. 195
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Helen: Not all lawyers are litigators. Also, a lot of litigation is just business disputes – what does this contract clause really mean, etc. IMO, it is the culture and lifestyle that are the difficult part – especially at large firms and their off-shoot boutique practices.

  196. 196
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @WaterGirl:

    Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-TX) sneaks up on a fellow congressman to “photobomb” him.

    What? What?

    How do I miss all the interesting stories?

    /off to consult the old Google machine

  197. 197
    MattR says:

    @Roger Moore:

    I personally think they should extend that basic idea to other things found on the person (e.g. you can’t read papers once they’ve been identified as papers rather than weapons) but it’s really a completely different argument from the one about phone metadata.

    I understand what you are saying and appreciate the historical context. But since they did not want to extend that basic idea to those other things, the decision had to offer a rationale for why that protection applies to cell phones but not other items like physical papers. I could see how some future judge could use that decision and apply that same standard to determine that collecting email and/or cell phone metadata without a warrant is unconstitutional (kind of like how the logic behind overturning DOMA was used in state level same sex marriage cases).

  198. 198
    WaterGirl says:

    @SiubhanDuinne: I know! I had to google this one:

    “Virginia Republicans bribed a Democratic senator into resigning his seat with promise of a job, cell phone, and a car. ”

    I knew about the promise of the job and the judgeship for the daughter, but I had completely missed the cell phone and the car.

  199. 199
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @WaterGirl:

    Oh, I missed cell phone and car too!

    Oddly, these schemes rarely work out quite the way their perpetrators/putative beneficiaries anticipate.

    Strange, that.

  200. 200
    WaterGirl says:

    @Baud: Come on now, I only said they were both on the BJ attorney’s list.

  201. 201
    Helen says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Yeah now that you mention it; When the whole “Obama said that business owners didn’t build their business” crap erupted and we were trying to convince them (HA, I kid; you can’t convince them) that he was talking about infrastructure, some entity (the ABA?) said that 60% of court cases are one business suing another business and who’s gonna pay for that?

  202. 202
    Botsplainer says:

    @WereBear:

    The lawyer suicide plague has become the subject of much ineffectual handwringing by state bars happy to heap responsibility that jacks up workload, cranking out high numbers of new lawyers annually, offering insufficient support to licensees, and failing to encourage the bench to assist in maintaining work/life balance in a profession that provides few material rewards at the consumer end while being devilishly stressful.

  203. 203
    Baud says:

    @WaterGirl:

    I guess that’s better than being on an attorney’s BJ list.

  204. 204
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Baud: Wouldn’t that depend upon the attorney?

  205. 205
    WaterGirl says:

    @SiubhanDuinne: Do we think these republicans have ever heard the word “decorum”? Or understand the concept, even if they don’t know the word for it? Un-fucking-believable!

  206. 206
    CONGRATULATIONS! says:

    I do respect the members of Catholic orders who are consistent in opposing both abortion and the death penalty.

    @Glocksman: Never met one. Including my wife. Can you point out where I might find one of these mythic creatures?

  207. 207
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @WaterGirl: To them, decorum means wearing a tie.

  208. 208
    Baud says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Only if that attorney is you, Omnes. /Little Boots

  209. 209
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Baud: ::shudder::

  210. 210
    Glocksman says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Heh.
    I can think of a few local attorneys that if they offered such a ‘settlement’, I’d accept in a heartbeat.

    Though it wouldn’t do much for the public image as lawyers as ‘legalized whores’. :)

  211. 211
    Baud says:

    @Glocksman:

    Best consent order evah.

  212. 212
    Botsplainer says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Pulling all-nighters while eating out of the vending machine in order to get ready for trial or finish a deal is seen as dedication by senior partners in firms.

    Not to mention all too many judges who really don’t give a fuck about our lives.

    Case in point – Wednesday night, I had to take my wife to the ER; she suffered a frightening headache following removal of her ovary, and I was concerned about an infection or an aneurism, as she was light, sound and touch sensitive. Didn’t get home until 1:30 am.

    Next morning, I had a needless 8 am hearing on a summer visitation request completely consistent with every order. Despite me apologizing in advance for any fog (and why), he insisted on being a dick, not only did he violate his own disclosure order on prehearing document production on material directly relevant to the reason for the other side’s objection, he was coy about it before shittily telling my guy he’s right but unreasonably rigid.

    He and I are going to have private words next week.

  213. 213
    Helen says:

    @CONGRATULATIONS!: I have to say – and I will be calm here because last time I spoke of this here I went crazy and more than one person told me I needed to calm down – those people exist.

    My sister is a practicing Catholic. In 2011 her son, Alex was murdered. The murderer could have gotten the death penalty; he was WAY eligible. And there was no doubt. Alex was missing, and the killer with NO evidence against him, confessed and led the police to Alex’s body. When it came to the trial phase my sister was asked by the prosecution “we can pursue the death penalty at trial or we can get him to agree to life in prison without possibility of parole.” My sister requested the latter. She did not want her son’s killer to die at the hands of the State.

    And one more thing. My sister is a die hard Republican and Alex, lovely as he was and regardless of how much he loved his Aunt Helen, was a teabagger.

    So those people do exist.

  214. 214
    WaterGirl says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): To them, decorum means wearing a tie with their white sheet white shirt.

  215. 215
    WereBear says:

    @Botsplainer: I hope she’s doing better now.

    I appreciate the insights shared here on the profession; I know someone pressuring their kid into law school, and the young person has zero interest. Parents are fixated for some reason…

  216. 216
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    PIRATE MOVIES! Specifically, the Jackie Cooper/Wallace Beery Treasure Island.

  217. 217
    Roger Moore says:

    @David Koch:
    I think a big part of it is that the doctrines start out with a reasonable idea that gets stretched bit by bit until it reaches an obviously illogical conclusion. It’s helped along the way by judges who are more focused on the case at hand than the precedent they’re setting and will only change their mind when something is obviously way out of whack.

    In this case, it obviously makes sense to let police look through an arrestee’s pockets to look for weapons. Well, what happens if you turn up evidence of another crime, like drugs? You were doing a legitimate search and turned up something unexpected, and the rules already say you’re still allowed to keep evidence in that case. So the drugs are still legitimate evidence. Then somebody says that if you can take advantage of evidence of drugs, you should also be able to look through their reading material if you find it on their person. That probably shouldn’t have been allowed, but tough on crime judges let it go through because they didn’t want to mess up a case and the guy was guilty anyway. Next thing you know, they’re asking to be able to rifle through somebody’s entire life on their cell phone, and only that is going too far for the more conservative judges.

  218. 218
    WereBear says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Can’t watch Wallace Beery at all anymore. Much less with Jackie Cooper!

  219. 219
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @WereBear: But it’s Treasure Island.

  220. 220
    WaterGirl says:

    @Helen: If someone had murdered my nephew I would be simultaneously enraged and inconsolable. I am so sorry, Helen.

  221. 221
    GregB says:

    We just need to meet the people who want to assassinate the president, stone gays, electrocute immigrants and believe that their rivals are replicants half way.

    It will make David Brooks, Cokie Roberts and Ron Fournier happy.

  222. 222
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @WaterGirl:

    Or even know how to spell it it?

  223. 223
    David Koch says:

    @MattR: the problem is the Court has repeatedly ruled that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy on information you have “knowingly exposed” to a third party, such as bank and phone records. It’s kind of like mail. You have a reasonable expectation of privacy to the contents inside a letter, but not to the metadata you knowingly exposed on outside of the envelope (addresses, postmarks).

    Now if they overturn those decision that would be fine. but what they usually do is keep the prior ruling and come up with something new that is inconsistent. Also too, they have a history of not applying rationales from one body of searches law to a different but similar body of search law.

  224. 224
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @SiubhanDuinne: I. T.

  225. 225
    Corner Stone says:

    @WereBear:

    I know someone pressuring their kid into law school, and the young person has zero interest. Parents are fixated for some reason

    They are fools.

  226. 226
    Baud says:

    @David Koch:

    This exactly.

  227. 227
    Corner Stone says:

    @GregB:

    We just need to meet the people who want to assassinate the president, stone gays, electrocute immigrants and believe that their rivals are replicants half way.

    I thought you were talking about AQ right until that last one.

  228. 228
    Violet says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Also, the profession tends to encourage people to push themselves and ignore their own health (both physical and mental). Pulling all-nighters while eating out of the vending machine in order to get ready for trial or finish a deal is seen as dedication by senior partners in firms. That culture gets absorbed.

    Same with surgeons. They boast about not having taken a vacation for seventeen years–that kind of thing. The hours are brutal. I know quite a fed medical students who loved their surgery rotations but decided the lifestyle of a surgeon was too demanding and the culture–especially for women–was not at all conducive to having any kind of life outside of work.

    Keep that in mind if you or a loved one needs surgery. The surgeon works in an environment that encourages pushing oneself and not taking breaks.

  229. 229
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @WereBear:

    Can’t watch Wallace Beery at all anymore.

    Why?

    Much less with Jackie Cooper!

    Why?

    (Not being snarky or mean; seriously curious.)

  230. 230
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    Heh. You funny man.

  231. 231
    a hip hop artist from Idaho (fka Bella Q) says:

    @Helen: I know that one! Nobody. Unless you want to call estate planning to minimize intergenerational transfer taxation happy. Which I guess it is, because it takes a metric shit ton of money to make it worth the bother (read expense) of having a good estate lawyer do that. It’s always been malpractice for me to do anything beyond say “tax” so I’ve never been consulted on that basis.

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Exactly – it’s the big firm grind that is really hard on so many. I always knew I wasn’t temperamentally suited for that environment, so I avoided it. Many days I miss being in court, but I don’t have the stamina to go back to being in court every day.

  232. 232
    Poopyman says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): There is no other version.

    Re:LB. I thought it was a she, and was waiting for whatever the BJ version of “Play ‘Misty’ for Me” is to be posted.

  233. 233
    WereBear says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): I know, and it’s a fine movie. Chemistry.

    Even as a child, I didn’t like Bing Crosby’s voice… and it turns out he was an abusive father. I don’t know if that has anything to do with it or not, but it makes the holidays even more tricky to negotiate!

  234. 234
    Glocksman says:

    @Violet:

    That would explain why my Congressman is teabagger Larry Buschon.
    As I tell everyone who’ll listen, he’s an excellent heart surgeon (he implanted my artificial heart valve) but a lousy Congressman.

    Hard work will get you ahead, too bad that Buschon is an asshole

  235. 235
    Helen says:

    @WaterGirl: Thank you. One moves past it. But what I have learned (my mother died when I was 12) is that grief is not linear. You’re horrified and then you’re good for a while and then you are horrified and then you’re good and then you’re horrified and then anger appears. The trend is down, but it often rears it’s ugly head many years later when you do not expect it. The post I talked about upthread was when the father of the Sandy Hook killer opened his mouth. Too much for me to deal with. Again. Thank you.

    But. Life goes on.

  236. 236
    WereBear says:

    @SiubhanDuinne: Jackie has said many times that working with the man was a nightmare. Per Wikipedia:

    A legion of film critics and fans have lauded the relationship between the two as an example of classic movie magic. However, in his autobiography Cooper wrote that Beery was “a big disappointment”, and accused him of upstaging and other attempts to undermine the boy’s performances out of what Cooper presumed was jealousy.

    I have heard from other sources it wasn’t as mild as “disappointment” and in fact escalated to outright abusive behavior.

    It doesn’t always matter, but in this case it runs so counter to his onscreen persona it really gets in my way. A sort of Woody-Allen-squickiness situation.

  237. 237
    Roger Moore says:

    @Helen:

    Really who calls a lawyer when they’re happy and satisfied?

    There’s actually a lot of proactive legal work that’s designed to keep people out of trouble. A lot of writing contracts, wills, powers of attorney, etc. is about thinking of possible problems and heading them off before they happen. Compliance is about knowing the law so you can help people make sure they’re obeying it. Then there are branches that are about helping people negotiate complicated things that they don’t do very often so they can get what they want, like immigration and adoption.

  238. 238
    WereBear says:

    @WereBear: Obviously, this reaction varies… my first reaction to beholding W’s visage was instant revulsion, and I was totally baffled at the people who found him so warm and appealing.

  239. 239
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @WereBear: I had to change the channel when he came on TV as far back as 1999.

  240. 240
    WereBear says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Yes! It was horrifying when he “won” the election and I realized I was about to live through one of those “interesting times” in history.

    And to think I turned out to be too optimistic about how bad it would get.

  241. 241
    Baud says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name):

    It’s when I gave up on the media.

  242. 242
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @WereBear: Interestingly, the other person I know who reacted that was was my grandmother who was closing in on 80 at the time he was elected. Most of my extended family voted against him, but Grandma and I were the only ones who had a visceral reaction to him.

  243. 243
    Poopyman says:

    @WereBear: Do you remember the old bushaschimp website, pre 9/11? Those days seem so quaint, now.

  244. 244
    WaterGirl says:

    @Helen: Yep. I think of grief as like a river. You can’t fight the river; you just have to go where it takes you. Definitely not linear.

  245. 245
    Helen says:

    @Corner Stone: @Roger Moore:

    Yeah but if I want to leave Corner Stone most of my money (LOTS) and my Dad $1 why the fuck do I need a lawyer? Can I just not write a note that says “Corner Stone gets my money”?

  246. 246
    WaterGirl says:

    @WereBear: When I was applying for jobs (decades ago) there was one position that would have been perfect for me, and they offered me the job. But I had an inexplicable negative reaction to the department head, so I did not take the job. My instincts served me well; it turns out that he was an alcoholic (as was my mom).

  247. 247
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Helen: Because your dad will sue and say that Corner Stone was exerting undue influence on you and, given his charm here, your dad may well be right. Having a will drafted by a lawyer makes it much more likely that your intent will be effected. A well drafted will is hard to set aside. Something you did with a DIY kit might not be. You could do your own plumbing, but will you get the result you want?

  248. 248
    WaterGirl says:

    @Baud: @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): I was instantly repulsed and could not bear to hear the man speak. Definitely a visceral reaction. That was a long 8 years. I basically had to disengage.

  249. 249
    WereBear says:

    @Poopyman: Yes, it was one of the first online sites I got involved in!

    Some good stuff there.

  250. 250
    Helen says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Yeah well too bad for Corner Stone. I’ m spending it on me

  251. 251
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Helen: That obviates the need for an attorney drafted will.

  252. 252
    Helen says:

    @Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name): Yeah Mr. Attorney – who gets my apt?

  253. 253
    Omnes Omnibus (the first of his name) says:

    @Helen: Do you own it? If so, and you die intestate (without a will), your statutory next of kin would inherit.

  254. 254
    David Koch says:

    getting back to the question of telephone metadata, I think opponents are going about it the wrong way. Instead of arguing legality, they should opposite on policy grounds.

    The argument would be we don’t want the government to have this power because of the potential of abuse and it hasn’t been shown to work.

    This is the argument opponents of gun control have effectively used. Whether they’re actually right is beside the point. They argue that with gun regulations comes the potential of abuse and criminals will always ignore regulations.

    But this also raises another question.

    As a Progressive/Obot, first class, I can say we believe in gun regulations, even gun registration, and dismiss as delusional and unfounded the arguments and fears pushed by gun nuts that government will one day confiscate their precious machine guns.

    But how can that position be reconciled with the Progressive fear that the government will one day use telephone metadata in a abusive manner?

    trust the government on the issue of guns, but not on meta data.

    Is that logical? Can the party that believes in government really say, on one hand, fears of gun control is irrational, but on the other, fears of telephone metadata collection is legitimate?

  255. 255
    Fort Geek says:

    @Morzer: I thought it was “a batshit of teabaggers.”

    ETA: also “A treason of Republicans”

  256. 256
    terben says:

    A member of the Tea Party doing the honorable thing. Who would have thought?

  257. 257
    Ajaye says:

    My intuition on this is that it is analagous to Watergate. An upstanding lawyer political activist type with deep connections would have no problems facing down the nursing home charge if not guilty. In fact would only serve as more evidence of how system is corrupt etc. and he could use it for more political advantage. however the entire campaign he was involved with just reeks overall. There was the still mysterious incident of McDaniel’s people accidentally getting locked in with ballots. The investigation on that seems to have been strangely handled. If this man was involved in dirty political tricks, trying to interfere with ballots, influencing the ensuing investigations…that would be more than a misdemeanor. He probably knew the nursing home incident was just the tip of the ice berg, especially if federal agencies that can’t be bought get involved. Plus, no doubt understood would be facing loss of his business and possible disbarment in future as well. And his guy did not win, so no sinecure forthcoming.

  258. 258
    J R in WV says:

    I agree with those who think the lawyer shot himself because the nursing home invasion, as horrific and immoral as that was, is only the tip of a very nasty iceburg of disgusting!

    And the candidate who evidently feels that it is the proper thing to do to contest a lost election, he’s an un-American piece of excrement who deserves the legal problems it appears he will be spending the rest of his life dealing with.

  259. 259
    Faux News says:

    @Amir Khalid: Are you sure you are not Hermann Cain?

  260. 260
    Pongo says:

    @CONGRATULATIONS!: Totally agree. Or he could have gone ‘Goebbels’ and decided that world that rejected McDaniel was simply not a world he wanted to live in.

    Or Hillary did it.

Comments are closed.