Utter and Complete McArdle Pwnage

Via valued commenter Bill E Pilgrim, a clip of Jon Chait delivering the most devastating retort since Woody Allen produced Marshall McLuhan to silence a pompous blowhard in “Annie Hall.”

Burn, baybee. Buurrrrnnnn!

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157 replies
  1. 1
    different-church-lady says:

    Well to be fair, the title of her 2010 column was technically true, but collectively nonsense.

  2. 2
    raven says:

    nooooooo, not again!

  3. 3
    trollhattan says:

    -Takes up smoking
    -Celebratory smoke
    -Quits smoking

    Obamacare!

    And thank you, brother Chait.

  4. 4
    Baud says:

    @raven:

    2 of 3.

  5. 5
    jl says:

    Nice to see the style Mitt Romney pioneered in his last two debates with Obama is catching on with that crowd.

  6. 6
    Betty Cracker says:

    @raven: What, did someone already post it? If so, I missed it!

  7. 7
    dmsilev says:

    “Please proceed, McArdle.”

  8. 8
    El Cid says:

    The arrogant fucking idiot sits there and specifies a system in which the central cost of the market is removed — catastrophic care — and repeatedly describes it as “preserving the market“.

    Oh, okay. She’s all for “market” systems in which the costs to private companies is borne by the public.

    God damn do I hate our system of elevating idiots, dupes, liars, and skilled combinations of the three to not simply public commentary positions but to fetishized ‘deep thinker’ levels.

    God damnit, in the same sound bite she describes a soshullization of cost as ‘the market’.

  9. 9
    raven says:

    @Betty Cracker: No, not it, just her. It’s cool, I should be ashamed that this is another person I have not read. Like “Sully”.

  10. 10
    Gin & Tonic says:

    @different-church-lady: To actually be fair, the column Chait quoted the title of *was* a robust (by her standards) argument against national health care. To quote one passage:

    The other major reason that I am against national health care is the increasing license it gives elites to wrap their claws around every aspect of everyone’s life. Look at the uptick in stories on obesity in the context of health care reform. Fat people are a problem! They’re killing themselves, and our budget! We must stop them!

    She, as Chait says, really *is* against national health care.

  11. 11
    LanceThruster says:

    @dmsilev:

    Quantum physics Q: did the singlarity exand faster than the speed of light in the initial moments?

  12. 12
    LanceThruster says:

    @dmsilev:

    Quantum physics Q: did the singlarity exand faster than the speed of light in the initial moments?

  13. 13
    LanceThruster says:

    @dmsilev:

    Quantum physics Q: did the singlarity exand faster than the speed of light in the initial moments?

  14. 14
    Baud says:

    Oh, are we doing a physics chat again? I’m in.

  15. 15
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    BUUUUUURRRRN!

    Bitch slap upside the head!

  16. 16
    LanceThruster says:

    @Baud:

    Was looking for explanation for layman.

  17. 17
    LanceThruster says:

    Ignore the 3 parallel universe Qs.

  18. 18

    McCardle is not the only buffoon covering the economy. NewHour’s Paul Solmon gave air time to a debt scold and economic fear monger yesterday.

    ETA: Does anyone take McCardle seriously?

  19. 19
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    The way she says “Mr. Chait says I’m against national health care, which is actually not true” is…bizarre…especially the pronunciation of the word “true”.

    Good grief, that ball is going to need a passport because it will land in South America, Chait hit is so hard.

  20. 20
    raven says:

    You know the conversation last night about Deborah Blum and her writing about poison? It turns out her dad, Murray S. Blum, once came to out house to collect some of the lubbers in out yard!

  21. 21
    Baud says:

    @LanceThruster:

    I can give you a layman’s explanation. If you want a correct explanation, however, you may want to wait for dmsilev.

  22. 22
    Suzanne says:

    It it really inappropriate how much I enjoy watching dumbasses get their comeuppance. Not quite third-level orgasm, but close.

  23. 23
    Mike in NC says:

    @El Cid:

    I hate our system of elevating idiots, dupes, liars, and skilled combinations of the three to not simply public commentary positions but to fetishized ‘deep thinker’ levels.

    Well at least we’re not putting them in elective office at the local, state, and federal levels where they can wreak even greater damage. Oh wait.

  24. 24
    Botsplainer says:

    @LanceThruster:

    Yes, which is why it was a singularity.

    I’m not a physicist (makes my head hurt), but I’ve wondered about whether the Big Bang is actually occurring right now, and that the visible universe is actually the region of space we are closest to (like the nearest pellets in a shotgun blast, or sparkly element from the explosion of a firework). I wonder if that’s what the red shift means at the extremes.

    I’ve asked physicists if they thought that an observer in a galaxy at the edge of our observation sees nothing but space in the direction of travel, but they say no.

  25. 25
    fuzz says:

    @schrodinger’s cat:

    I saw that too and thought it was a little weird. In fairness to PBS though I think they did mention a few times during the piece how this guy has been saying the same thing for years and been wrong.

    I like the News Hour but always thought they covered international stories better than national ones. They really do a good job on Syria as an example, and covered Iraq and Afghanistan better than most, but at the same time they have Shields and Brooks. Still beats the alternative.

  26. 26
    Ken says:

    @LanceThruster:

    Ignore the 3 parallel universe Qs.

    Oh, I thought you were proposing three parallel universes, in one of which the singularity expanded more slowly than the speed of light, one in which it was faster, and one in which it expanded exactly at the speed of light. The obvious implications for the values of lambda and the cosmological constant are left as an exercise.

  27. 27
    John Cole says:

    I edited this post to add pink himalyan salt and technically true but collectively nonsense categories, as every McArgleBargle post should have.

    Also too, that was amazing.

  28. 28
    Ash Can says:

    That poor thing is in way over her head. She needs to just disappear and get a job in a nice, anonymous mid-sized city as a paralegal or bank teller.

  29. 29
    LanceThruster says:

    @Baud:

    (Repost) All are much appreciated.

  30. 30
    LanceThruster says:

    @Baud:

    (Repost) All are much appreciated.

  31. 31

    @fuzz: Their economic coverage is fairly bad and giving this person air time gives him legitimacy.

  32. 32
    Baud says:

    @Botsplainer:

    I’ve wondered about whether the Big Bang is actually occurring right now,

    As I understand it, the Big Bang is the explanation for why we currently see the universe expanding. So I don’t think the Big Bang itself can be happening right now, at least as we conceive it.

  33. 33
    dmsilev says:

    @LanceThruster: Sort of. The technical term for what you’re asking about is ‘inflation’; there’s a decent Wikipedia article on the subject. ‘Faster than the speed of light’ is difficult to answer when the question is “how quickly is space-time expanding?”, but the most straightforward answer is yes.

  34. 34
    Baud says:

    @LanceThruster:
    @LanceThruster:

    Your universe is collapsing!

  35. 35
    LanceThruster says:

    @Baud:

    I’ll keep my head down.

    xD

  36. 36
    dmsilev says:

    @Baud: No, the Big Bang is over and done with (in this universe, at least). That’s the point when the entire mass/energy of the universe is concentrated in one tiny tiny little area. Subatomic particles like protons and electrons couldn’t exist at such high energy densities, never mind more complicated constructs like molecules or overly curious hairless apes.

  37. 37
    Baud says:

    @LanceThruster:

    And now it’s down to one. Congrats!

  38. 38
    draftmama says:

    What really got my attention (having grown up in England and still talking hoity toity Queen’s English simply because I’m too old to change) is that she is trying to sound like an upper class English twit. This is bizarre….

  39. 39
    cokane says:

    this is the problem with mcmegan stupid and dissembling

  40. 40

    @Baud: Three universes collapsed into one?

  41. 41
    dmsilev says:

    @draftmama: To be fair, she’s got the ‘upper class twit’ part of it down pat.

  42. 42
    Baud says:

    @schrodinger’s cat:

    I hope for LanceThruster’s sake it doesn’t collapse further.

  43. 43
    LanceThruster says:

    2nd Q : In regards to an open or closed universe…if the simplified explanation is something came from nothing because nothing was unstable, couldn’t that same ‘hiccup’ occur again regardless of what happens to the mass after the atomic motion ceases.

    Thx for theanswers and links btw.

  44. 44
    trollhattan says:

    @dmsilev:

    Let’s line up some matchboxes and invite her to jump over. It’s only fair that we verify her twitnosity.

  45. 45
    El Cid says:

    Relax.

    Collapse of the Universe Is Closer Than Ever Before

    Dec. 12, 2013 — Maybe it happens tomorrow. Maybe in a billion years. Physicists have long predicted that the universe may one day collapse, and that everything in it will be compressed to a small hard ball. New calculations from physicists at the University of Southern Denmark now confirm this prediction — and they also conclude that the risk of a collapse is even greater than previously thought.

    Sooner or later a radical shift in the forces of the universe will cause every little particle in it to become extremely heavy. Everything — every grain of sand on Earth, every planet in the solar system and every galaxy — will become millions of billions times heavier than it is now, and this will have disastrous consequences: The new weight will squeeze all material into a small, super hot and super heavy ball, and the universe as we know it will cease to exist.

    This violent process is called a phase transition and is very similar to what happens when, for example water turns to steam or a magnet heats up and loses its magnetization. The phase transition in the universe will happen if a bubble is created where the Higgs-field associated with the Higgs-particle reaches a different value than the rest of the universe. If this new value results in lower energy and if the bubble is large enough, the bubble will expand at the speed of light in all directions. All elementary particles inside the bubble will reach a mass, that is much heavier than if they were outside the bubble, and thus they will be pulled together and form supermassive centers.

    [Note — this has nothing to do with models of expansion relating to dark energy, etc.]

  46. 46
    Betty Cracker says:

    @John Cole: Thank you. I can’t keep all the damn tags straight and tend to over-rely on “Assholes” as my catch-all.

  47. 47
    Baud says:

    @draftmama:

    To be fair, it seems that in the U.S. an English accent is taken as evidence of credibility.

  48. 48
    LanceThruster says:

    What brought this on was watching multiple episodes of “How the Universe Works. ‘

  49. 49
    Suffern ACE says:

    I completely missed the controversy that bill de Blasio ate pizza with utensils and Maureen Dowd is now obsessed with the way another democratic man eats. Not surprisingly, she likes him less because of it and hopes you’ll like him less too.

  50. 50
    dmsilev says:

    @LanceThruster: In principle yes. As I understand it (cosmology is really really not my field…), an additional ‘hiccup’ as you put it would result in a separate universe, or at least a section of the universe that is completely disconnected from this one (so whether or not you call it ‘separate’ is more semantics than anything else).

    A lot of questions at that level are things we simply don’t have answers to and don’t have a good way of figuring out the answers. Observations of various things can give us hints of what was going on when the universe was very young, but we can’t see all the way back and we certainly can’t see back “before” (whatever that means…) the beginning.

  51. 51

    @Suffern ACE: NYT has another Democrat to beat up on, what fun!
    /snark

  52. 52
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @Villago Delenda Est:
    @draftmama:

    It’s a Thurston Howell-style lockjaw, a classic US type. I’d never really heard her speak before this and that’s the first thing that struck me. Hers comes and goes a little but that’s what it is. There are various names for it, Locust Valley Lockjaw, Long Island Lockjaw, etc.

    For me it just adds to the sense that she’s a Republican no matter what she claims she is, kind of a tribal marker, though that’s probably unfair to others since I’m know that there are people who grew up speaking that way who are not Republicans.

  53. 53

    @dmsilev: I thought you were an experimentalist, I vaguely remember you mentioning a while back something about making ice-cream with liquid nitrogen for some open house?

  54. 54
    cmorenc says:

    @LanceThruster:

    Quantum physics Q: did the singlarity exand faster than the speed of light in the initial moments?

    Supposedly the explanation is that although matter and energy, i.e. the stuff that occupies space are themselves limited to light-speed or below by relativity, space itself is not so bound. OK, that’s the explanation for why the space the singularity occupied could expand faster than the speed of light, but I still don’t get why the expansion of space doesn’t homogeneously expand the matter and space occuping it by an equal amount as it does so, thus being undetectable if you were within the singularity or any other portion of space since then. Although if space expands while objects in motion relative to one another within that space don’t, that means anything traveling between them will appear red-shifted to a lower frequency, even while arriving light at B from A will still appear from B to be moving at light-speed. GAAH! RUN AWAAAAY!

  55. 55
    LanceThruster says:

    Q3: absolute zero vs the cessation of a ll motion in the atom. Different things? Does no electron motion mean the atom collapses?

  56. 56
    Baud says:

    OT: Bill’s mention of Thurston Howell reminded me — the Professor has passed away.

  57. 57
    dmsilev says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: I am, and that is indeed one of our standard party tricks.

  58. 58
    trollhattan says:

    @Ash Can:

    She needs a sitcom titled “Touched by a Koch.” She’s touched, alright.

  59. 59
    Baud says:

    @cmorenc:

    Although if space expands while objects in motion relative to one another within that space don’t,

    I don’t think it works that way. As space expands, the distance between objects expands along with it.

  60. 60
    LanceThruster says:

    @Baud:

    Yeah, he could build a radio outta coconuts but he couldn’t patch a hole in the boat?

    xD

  61. 61
    Ruckus says:

    @draftmama:
    Well she does sound like a twit.
    Not sure that it matters if she gets the upper class or English part down.

    I really need to correct the above. She IS a twit.

  62. 62
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @LanceThruster:

    Duck and cover!

  63. 63
    Baud says:

    @dmsilev:

    Solid state?

  64. 64

    @dmsilev: What kind of experiments, Bose Einstein condensation? Low temp physics?

  65. 65
    trollhattan says:

    @schrodinger’s cat:

    What, doesn’t everyone?

    Am recalling the video of the dude starting his Weber with LOX. Good times.

  66. 66
    GregB says:

    @Baud:

    And the actor who played Reuben Kincaid on the Partridge Family and one of the two surviving Munchkins from the Wizard of Oz. The last survivor was one of the Lollipop Guild actors.

  67. 67
    trollhattan says:

    @LanceThruster:

    Calculating his Ginger/Maryanne time would be approximately zero on the mainland, why rush on fixin’ the Minnow?

  68. 68
    Botsplainer says:

    @cmorenc:

    Hawking says that the reason for the unequal dispersement of matter is imperfections within the formation of space-time. The imperfections were minuscule, but the results dramatic.

  69. 69
    dmsilev says:

    @LanceThruster:

    Q3: absolute zero vs the cessation of a ll motion in the atom. Different things? Does no electron motion mean the atom collapses?

    Ah, an easier question (ultra-low temperature is my field…). More precisely, absolute zero is when an atom, or a chunk of material, or whatever, is at its lowest-energy state. That means that overall, the atom isn’t moving. However, the ground state of an electron bound to a nucleus is actually “orbiting” at a finite distance. I use the quotation marks because you can’t really think of the electron as analogous to the moon circling the earth; instead, it’s this spread-out diffuse thing (the ‘wavefunction’) which surrounds the nucleus. For various reasons, the wavefunction doesn’t overlap the nucleus itself, but instead is generally a small distance away (about 5e-10 meters for hydrogen; other atoms have bigger electron clouds). So, even at absolute zero, the electrons don’t hit the nucleus.

  70. 70
    LanceThruster says:

    @trollhattan:

    Now you’re talkin’!

    xD

  71. 71
    Baud says:

    @GregB:

    Jeez. Is there anyone who’s not dead?

  72. 72
    dmsilev says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: Low-temperature physics. I take crystals of various types (mainly magnetic crystals), cool them down to within 0.02 degrees of absolute zero, and study what happens to their properties when we poke and prod them in various ways.

    The main sort of thing we look at are Quantum phase transitions.

  73. 73
    Baud says:

    @dmsilev:

    mainly magnetic crystals

    Who do they work?

  74. 74
    Central Planning says:

    @Baud:

    I don’t think it works that way. As space expands, the distance between objects expands along with it.

    I read Lawrence Krauss’ book “A Universe from Nothing: Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing”. He explains the universe expanding, and one of the other results is that in millions (billions?) of years from now, the expansion will make it look like (to a local observer on a planet) there is nothing else in the universe.

    I highly recommend it for the kinds of discussions on this thread.

  75. 75
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @Baud: Kirk Douglas, Olivia de Haviland and Luise Rainier.

  76. 76
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @dmsilev:

    when an atom, or a chunk of material, or whatever, is at its lowest-energy state.

    There’s a Rodney Dangerfield-style joke in there somewhere, but I’m not going to make it.

  77. 77
    cmorenc says:

    @Baud:

    @cmorenc:

    Although if space expands while objects in motion relative to one another within that space don’t,

    I don’t think it works that way. As space expands, the distance between objects expands along with it.

    I think that’s exactly equivalent to what I said.

  78. 78
    Baud says:

    @Jim, Foolish Literalist:

    My Lord, that won’t be true for much longer.

  79. 79
    Baud says:

    @cmorenc:

    I misread you then. Sorry.

  80. 80
    different-church-lady says:

    @Baud: Abe Vigoda.

  81. 81
    gbear says:

    @El Cid:

    Everything — every grain of sand on Earth, every planet in the solar system and every galaxy — will become millions of billions times heavier than it is now, and this will have disastrous consequences

    My own body has been way ahead of the curve on this one.

  82. 82
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @Baud: Me. I think. Let me check… Hmmm… Pulse, check; heartbeat, check;, respiration, check; brain function, uh oh.

  83. 83
    Baud says:

    @gbear:

    Ha! Now you know you can blame it on the Higgs field….

    And Obama, of course.

  84. 84
    different-church-lady says:

    @El Cid:

    the universe as we know it will cease to exist.

    They say that like it’s a bad thing.

  85. 85
    Baud says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    brain function, uh oh.

    What? Did you go off and become a Republican?

  86. 86
    gbear says:

    @Baud: The Higgs field and pizza.

  87. 87
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @Baud: Ouch.

  88. 88

    @Baud: Reading McCardle has that effect, is my guess.

  89. 89
    Honus says:

    @Baud: yeah, and Gilligan is gone from West Virginia, too.

  90. 90
    Cervantes says:

    @dmsilev:

    To be fair, she’s got the ‘upper class twit’ part of it down pat

    Twit? Certainly. Upper class? Hardly. Her dad was a lobbyist for the construction industry in Manhattan — need I say more? — and her mom was a realtor.

  91. 91
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    Mickey Rooney, Shecky Greene and Sid Cesar

  92. 92
    aimai says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim: No its fake english. She’s been pretending to be english as far as spelling for a while.

  93. 93
    LanceThruster says:

    Thx to all. You’ve made my slower than light train ride much more interesting.

  94. 94
    LanceThruster says:

    Thx to all. You’ve made my slower than light train ride much more interesting.

  95. 95
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @aimai: McArdle? To me it always sounded like some kind of speech impediment. What, or who, the hell is Peggy Noonan trying to sound like? I can never pin it down.

  96. 96

    @aimai: But why? Pretentious twit is pretentious.

  97. 97
  98. 98
    dmsilev says:

    @Jim, Foolish Literalist: I think Peggy Noonan checked out of this reality a while ago. Trying to Mae sense of her is a waste of time.

  99. 99
    Amir Khalid says:

    Off topic. But it’s funny, I promise.
    This BBC blog post about a Malaysian Internet meme was apparently blocked here from midnight to noon Thursday (Malaysian time) because someone feared it might hurt the Prime Minister’s fee-fees. Something he said about the price of kangkung (water spinach).

  100. 100
    efroh says:

    Here is the link to the entire debate, but I haven’t yet found when this fantastic burn occurs.

    http://fora.tv/2014/01/15/Obam.....ond_Rescue

    I would love to see her response.

  101. 101

    @dmsilev: Your research sounds cool. Do you use the Ising model to understand the phase transitions?

  102. 102
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    Dick Van Dyke, Rose Marie, Ed Asner, Cloris Leachman, Ann Morgan Guilbert, Betty White and, again, Carl Reiner.

    The key to a long life, obviously, is doing a sitcom with Mary Tyler Moore.

  103. 103

    BTW I is eagerly awaiting the return of Sherlock, loves me the curly Batch!

  104. 104
    MikeJ says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: Already over and leaving me waiting for season 4.

  105. 105
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @aimai: I don’t know about her spelling but I don’t hear anything UK going on, it just sounds like a combination of the ubiquitous and much-debated “fry” in mild doses mixed with a very US-style upper class manner.

  106. 106
    Warren Terra says:

    It should be pointed out that a system in which “catastrophic coverage” is provided but there are no provisions for routine doctor visits and no coverage short of a catastrophe remains catastrophic for public health: people know they can’t afford medical care except when circumstance has left them utterly no choice but to get it, and so they won’t get check-ups, they won’t get screening such as pap smears and mammograms and the like, and they’ll resist seeing the doctor when they’re unwell but not in immediate fear of death. The suggestion is a salve to the consciences of the middle class that leaves the underclass with essentially no access to medical care except in cases of traumatic injury or direst emergency.

  107. 107
    Felonius Monk says:

    Nature abhors a vacuum — scientists have yet to find any evidence that there is even one atom of anything between McMegan’s earrings.

  108. 108
    Anne Laurie says:

    @Baud: Henry Kissinger and Dick Cheney.

    As my Irish granny would say, “Heaven won’t have them, and hell doesn’t want them.”

  109. 109
    dmsilev says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: For some of our materials, yes the Ising model is the best way to understand them. The straight Ising model has been pretty well understood for a while, so we look at somewhat more complicated systems which are layered in top of the basic Ising structure (Transverse-field Ising model and Random-field Ising model are a couple that we’ve worked on). We also work with materials that have Heisenberg symmetry instead of Ising, generally again with some more complicated structure overlaying that basic assumption.

    (Ising model is a mathematical model of atomic-scale magnets which says that they can only point in one of two directions, like a bar magnet that can only point north or south. Heisenberg spins can point in any direction they please. In between is what are called ‘xy’ spins, which are like a compass needle that can spin in a plane but can’t tilt up out of that plane. )

  110. 110
    Betty Cracker says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: Me too! My teenager is so impatient that she obtained bootlegged UK files. We tried to watch it on Chromecast, but it was maddeningly poor quality, so I gave up and decided to wait for the US release. The kiddo saw all three eps and is dying to spill spoilers, but so far we’ve kept her at bay…

  111. 111
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim: I don’t hear any UK in her accent either.

  112. 112
    dmbeaster says:

    @LanceThruster:

    did the singlarity exand faster than the speed of light in the initial moments?

    No. Space expanded, which is not the same thing as moving.

    The same issue exists now. As the furthest reaches of the visible universe, the cumulative expansion rate of the universe starts to exceed the speed of light. Portions of the universe beyond that limit can never be seen by us.

  113. 113
    TS says:

    @Gin & Tonic:

    She, as Chait says, really *is* against national health care.

    It’s the poors – they should just die rather than use up the healthcare that will allow the rich to do the trickle downing.

  114. 114
    dmbeaster says:

    @Botsplainer:

    I’ve asked physicists if they thought that an observer in a galaxy at the edge of our observation sees nothing but space in the direction of travel, but they say no.

    That is why the correct term is “visible universe.” The belief is that space is infinite, and that no matter where you are located, you would have the same view. Someone on the edge of our visible universe would have the same view we have — they would just be able to see portions of the universe that will be never be visible to us. Similarly, we see portions they can never see.

    Another part of the misconception on this is thinking of the Big Bang as a point source. It can be thought of that way only as to the portion of the universe that is visible to us. If the universe is infinite, then space erupted everywhere in the Big Bang — not just one point source. We just can only see part of it.

  115. 115
    🎂 Martin says:

    @schrodinger’s cat:

    ETA: Does anyone take McCardle seriously?

    Unfortunately, her employers do.

  116. 116

    The McMeganesque perfection of that debate is that her side “won” 32% to 59%. They poll the audience on the “motion” and then whichever side has a larger percentage increase “wins”. So, she wins, math does not matter and the dumb swing/undecided voters are the ones that make all the difference. Initial vote was 16% – 51%.

  117. 117
    Steeplejack says:

    @Baud:

    I’m not quite dead yet.

  118. 118
    aimai says:

    @Warren Terra: Yes, and 15 percent of an income which is almost nothing is still a lot of money. She also tossed that off. What I disliked themost about that tiny clip is the way she says what she is proposing is “progressive” –look, if you want to have a brutal system of nothing but catastrophic care for the majority of people (subsidized, presumably, because she basically admitted it would ahve to be) be honest about it. Its not progressive. Its not liberal. Its not even thoughtful. It is what it is: a terrible plan that is not health care at all but rather disaster reduction of a very feeble kind. But at least have the honesty of your so called convictions. That attempt to make this non-plan s ound like some kind of wise, reasoned, compromise between “the market” and “progressive” ideals was just so incredibly dishonest and manipulative it made me gag.

  119. 119
    Cervantes says:

    @efroh: The exchange came roughly half-way through the debate. Her response to Chait was simply to assert that her prior view had obviously been rendered inoperative by her own subsequent writing.

  120. 120
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @aimai:

    But at least have the honesty of your so called convictions.

    You are talking about McMegan; I think your expectation is unlikely to be fulfilled.

  121. 121
    Anya says:

    @draftmama: I remember reading one of her stupid posts about about the 08 election in the Atlantic and she was bragging (no other word for it) about how her mother is old money whose accent immediately establishes her class. I guess she grew up trying to copy her mother’s upper-class accent.

  122. 122
    efroh says:

    Thanks, Cervantes! Was able to find it with your help. It starts around 44:50 if anyone else wants to see it in context.

  123. 123
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @Anya:

    I guess she grew up trying to copy her mother’s upper-class accent.

    As much as I hate to defend her, if her mother had a particular accent, the fact that McMegan picked up the accent or aspects of it is a fairly normal thing.

  124. 124
    mclaren says:

    If only McArdle had quite blogging and started doing porn 10 years ago, we wouldn’t be having this discussion.

  125. 125
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Baud:

    Dick Cheney.

    Well, let’s put it this way. He’s animate. We’re pretty sure he’s undead.

  126. 126
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    Yes, but did she pick up the twit part from her mother? I’m fairly certain the deserting coward did.

  127. 127
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @Villago Delenda Est: Sadly, Bar is a distant relation – fifth cousin sort of thing.

  128. 128
    gwangung says:

    @draftmama: Heh. This theatre post may be of relevance:

    http://bittergertrude.com/2013.....f-accents/

  129. 129
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @gwangung: Another thing about accents in the US – we have more in common with Germany than the UK. Accents are first regional and then class based.

  130. 130
    Dexter's new approach says:

    Some think tank should ‘score” her proposal. Because a huge % of healthcare cost would fall to the govt. A huge % of healthcare cost come from a tiny % of the population -catastrophic . We pay more than 15% of are income on average for the insurance component, not because they manage our care well or provide incentives for preventive health, because we know they don’t do that. So what is the point then of keeping the current mechanics in place under her plan?

    She;s too dim to know she proposed an effective single payer system.

  131. 131
    trollhattan says:

    @mclaren:

    She tried but, you know, the markets spoke. “NEIN, MEINE AUGEN!!!”

  132. 132
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @trollhattan: Actually German pr0n opens doors that are best left closed.

  133. 133
    SFAW says:

    @Anya:

    one of her stupid posts

    That narrows it down how, exactly?

    Re: her accent: maybe my ears is shot, but she sounded more like the stereotypical Harvie (a/k/a Hahvahd student) than a Brit. Although the Hahvahd accent to which I refer probably had its heyday about 70 or 80 years ago.

    But Hahvahd or faux Brit, she’s still a twit.

  134. 134
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @SFAW:

    That narrows it down how, exactly?

    Well, her stupid posts are different from her really stupid posts which are different from her idiotic posts.

    ETA: She sounds like a lot of the people with whom I went to college.

  135. 135
    Studly Pantload, the emotionally unavailable unicorn says:

    “What does the universe have to do with it? You’re in Brooklyn! Brooklyn isn’t expanding!”

  136. 136
    SFAW says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    Sadly, Bar is a distant relation – fifth cousin sort of thing.

    My condolences.

    Is that why you’re in East Overshoe (or wherever in the North you are)? Trying to get away from Nuevo Aztlan Tejas ‘Murica Texas?

  137. 137
    SFAW says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    She sounds like a lot of the people with whom I went to college

    First Bar, now this. Which deity did you piss off, to be in such predicaments?

  138. 138
    SFAW says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    Well, her stupid posts are different from her really stupid posts which are different from her idiotic posts.

    Po-TAY-toe, Po-TAH-toe

  139. 139
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @SFAW: Bar is a New Englander not a Texan. Here is the thing – a fairly small number of people came to the Massachusetts Bay Colony prior to 1640. If you connect one of those families, you connect with most of them. They intermarried for years. My grandmother was the first of her family to marry outside of the Puritans – 300 years after they got here.

  140. 140
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @SFAW: Probably some Native American one. When you toss in the Pequod War and cheating NAs out portions of the Hamptons, there is some karma to work out.

  141. 141
    SFAW says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    Bar is a New Englander not a Texan.

    Yeah, I feel pretty stupid about that. Especially since I spend enough time in Maine, and since I’ve driven by Poppy and Bar’s place in Kennebunk (after his term, and before his idiot son was “elected”). Not close enough to see the M60s (yay, Saco!) of course.

    But, once again, I find my stupidity rearing its ugly head. I blame Obama and Clinton.

  142. 142
    SFAW says:

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    My grandmother was the first of her family to marry outside of the Puritans

    What the locals call a “mixed marriage.”

  143. 143
    Omnes Omnibus says:

    @SFAW: It’s fucking amazing. They moved from Salem to Concord to western New York without mixing a bit. In western NY, they mixed with folks from Connecticut (just like them – I have witches, accusers, judges, and clergy who objected to the trials in both groups). And then they went to WI.

  144. 144

    @Omnes Omnibus:

    Here is the thing – a fairly small number of people came to the Massachusetts Bay Colony prior to 1640. If you connect one of those families, you connect with most of them.

    One of my maternal ancestors was William Bradford. I have a verified ancestor who fought in the American Revolution, so I could join the DAR if I really wanted to. And yet somehow that branch of the family ended up Papists.

  145. 145
    MaryRC says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim: Katherine Hepburn and Gloria Vanderbilt had a little Locust Valley lockjaw going on too, but for me the prime example has always been the blonde fiancee in the Rosalind Russell version of “Auntie Mame”. That woman’s jaw and neck muscles must have ached at the end of the day.

  146. 146
    Batocchio says:

    Damn, I need a cigarette after that.

  147. 147
    Cervantes says:

    @SFAW:

    Re: her accent: maybe my ears is shot, but she sounded more like the stereotypical Harvie (a/k/a Hahvahd student) than a Brit. Although the Hahvahd accent to which I refer probably had its heyday about 70 or 80 years ago.

    First, she does not sound even vaguely British.

    Second, she went to Penn. (And then Chicago for grad. school.)

    Third, you’re right, there is no “Harvard accent” any more.

    Fourth, there is a Bostonian (or New England) version of English but it has nothing particular to do with Harvard.

  148. 148
    Cervantes says:

    @Studly Pantload, the emotionally unavailable unicorn:

    “What does the universe have to do with it? You’re in Brooklyn! Brooklyn isn’t expanding!”

    When the world was younger, I explained (more or less) the notion of a Big Bang to a very particular six-year-old. Her reaction was to ask why her room was not expanding.

  149. 149
    Howard Beale IV says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: Sully takes McMeghan seriously.

  150. 150
    Ecks says:

    @schrodinger’s cat: Is that like four seasons in one day?

  151. 151
    Jamey says:

    Dat video!!1 Aaaah, I need a cigarette.

  152. 152
    sy says:

    Outsourcing your light work again, eh.

  153. 153
    SFAW says:

    @Cervantes:

    Fourth, there is a Bostonian (or New England) version of English but it has nothing particular to do with Harvard.

    Actually, there are about 5 or 6 (probably more) Boston-metro-area accents (“Hey Joey! You from Reveah? So ain’t I!”), but, as you say, hers resembles none of them.

    Which is why I didn’t bring it up originally.

    The Hahvahd accent is not one you find in Southie, Eastie, Hyde Pahk, Chelsea, Dot, Reveah, Meffud, or any other tribal sub-enclave in the area. It came from the preppie class, I believe, and sometimes reminds me of William F. Buckley (although he was a Yalie), and I guess is sort of a Mid-Atlantic accent.

  154. 154
    Cervantes says:

    @SFAW:

    The Hahvahd accent is not one you find in Southie, Eastie, Hyde Pahk, Chelsea, Dot, Reveah, Meffud, or any other tribal sub-enclave in the area. It came from the preppie class, I believe, and sometimes reminds me of William F. Buckley (although he was a Yalie), and I guess is sort of a Mid-Atlantic accent.

    When Harvard still admitted a largely homogeneous class of undergraduates, they had a common social background and thus a common language. As you pointed out earlier, this hasn’t been true for more than fifty years.

    Let’s not talk about Bill Buckley unless there’s a pressing need.

  155. 155
    pseudonymous in nc says:

    I had never heard McMuggins speak, and that’s a McGargle of an accent.

  156. 156
  157. 157
    Barry says:

    @Howard Beale IV: “Sully takes McMeghan seriously. ”

    Didn’t Sullivan hire her for the Atlantic?

    And give her her first break into the Real Big Boyz and Girlz Medya?

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