Romney’s Legacy

Garry Wills’ fairly brutal assessment of Mitt Romney’s future, where he tries, and fails, to find recent campaign loser with as little to offer as Romney, got me thinking about a historical figure marginal enough to compare with Romney. The guy in this (great) photo, Wendell Willkie, Roosevelt’s opponent in 1940, is one possibility. He was a corporate lawyer who hadn’t run for office until he faced Roosevelt in 1940. However, unlike what I expect Romney to do, he joined forces with FDR to promote internationalism and wrote a book about the “one world” movement. Since he died in 1944, at age 52, we don’t know exactly what he would have done had he lived a full life.

Probably a better candidate is poor old Tom Dewey, the governor of a Northeastern state who also thought he was going to win on one of the nights he ran for President. After losing to FDR in ’44 and, more famously, to Truman in 48, Dewey pretty much stayed on the sidelines, turning down a nomination from LBJ for the Supreme Court, and concentrating on making money as a corporate lawyer. I imagine Mitt will follow a similar path.

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204 replies
  1. 1
    Killjoy says:

    Who?

  2. 2
    JPL says:

    Maybe but without the Supreme Court part..

  3. 3
    Baud says:

    @Killjoy:

    More like, who cares?

  4. 4
    WereBear says:

    Has Mitt Romney EVER done anything else but make money?

    While successful at amassing it and not letting anyone else have it, I don’t think he’s particularly good at actually making it appear.

    Heck, I could take over a company, hoover up its assets, and leave the husk on the side of the road. Is this a skilled job?

  5. 5
    Cermet says:

    Once a Vulture, always a parasite on our country. Parasites never die, they just keep looking for a new host to bleed and suck dry. At leaset we got the pleasure to tell that asswipe – “Your fired!”

    Hey, he’s right, I like doing that to a piece of low life shit like him.

    You’re fired, you’re fired … feels good in the morning.

  6. 6
    Chris says:

    This reminds me of my American Diplomatic History course at Indiana University (which has a Wilke Hall), with Prof. Joan Hoff (a Nixon biographer) having a socratic back and forth with one of my classmates, who turned out to be Wilke’s grandson.

  7. 7
    Kirk says:

    Right now I’d call it even odds Romney blames the loss on others and throws his hat in the ring for 2016.

  8. 8
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    Somewhere among my thousands upon thousands of books, I actually own an autographed copy of “One World.” As I am probably never going to read it, maybe I should find out if anyone would pay cash money for it.

    Retirement project: catalogue personal library and get rid of 90% of dead-tree books. Be ruthless. Seriously, I mean it.

  9. 9
    PeakVT says:

    I like this borderline non-encyclopedic paragraph from Wikipedia:

    Indeed, given Truman’s sinking popularity and the Democratic Party’s three-way split (between Truman, Henry A. Wallace, and Strom Thurmond), Dewey had seemed unstoppable. Republicans figured that all they had to do to win was to avoid making any major mistakes, and as such Dewey did not take any risks. He spoke in platitudes, trying to transcend politics. Speech after speech was filled with empty statements of the obvious, such as the famous quote: “You know that your future is still ahead of you.”

    The hubris feels familiar.

  10. 10
    RoonieRoo says:

    I think the more interesting question, now that Romney slides off stage right, is “who is the leader of the Republican party?”

  11. 11
    brettvk says:

    I really don’t expect Mitt to do anything with his wealth and legacy that enriches anybody outside of his family or the LDS. He could get lots of props inside the Mormon hierarchy for a relatively small investment, and maybe that will be really satisfying to him, since it seem he’s comfortable with hermetically-sealed bubbles. And he may owe the church some back tithes if he’s finagled his taxes — he’d probably come clean to the prophet before he’d stop cheating his fellow citizens.

    I don’t think Mitt is stupid. I think he’d like to have a legacy as the sort of international statesman that Jimmy Carter has made himself, but I don’t think he could possibly force himself to be that generous. Even if he gets his own planet when he dies, he seems to think he can take the Bain cash with him to furnish it.

  12. 12
    WereBear says:

    @RoonieRoo: Heck, when that question has come up in the past, hasn’t it always been Limbaugh?

  13. 13
    El Cid says:

    Romney attempted a leveraged buyout of the U.S. government, looking forward to pocketing lots of fees and commissions and using its assets and revenues to pay off his backers with interest.

    In the end, the U.S. rejected the offer.

  14. 14
    aretino says:

    I doubt that Romney will be as memorably mocked as Wendell Willkie, whom Harold Ickes called “a simple, barefoot Wall Street lawyer.”

  15. 15
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @Killjoy: @Baud: Yup. Willard will fade from even our memories faster than Dukakis. No disrespect to him, but I bet your average voter would have to stop and think when it was MD ran, and against whom. My other prediction, four years from now, having flamed out early in the GOP primaries, Paul Ryan will resign from Congress to take Palin’s place as Fox News concern troll, if Palin, who looked pretty haggard on Tuesday night, lasts that long.

  16. 16
    dan says:

    A man who did nothing but serve his own ambition his entire life is not going to turn suddenly to serving others.

  17. 17
    fourmorewars says:

    Thought you’d get a kick out of this. On a rw facebook page called, w/o a trace of irony, ‘Uber-American,’ one of the fan posts states breathlessly that 17 states have petitioned to succeed (sic) from the U.S. No, that’s not the funny part. The funny part is the page moderator’s reply: “If this is real, then why isn’t it on Drudge?”

  18. 18
    Craigo says:

    Tom Dewey didn’t stay on the sidelines long – he drafted Eisenhower in 1952 specifically to kneecap frontunner Bob Taft (of Taft-Hartley infamy). Since there was essentially no way the GOP wasn’t winning in 1952, we should at least thank him for that.

  19. 19
    Zifnab25 says:

    @Kirk: That’s not how the GOP works. He had his turn. Now he’s done.

    Maybe Tag will get a shot at the big time in 20 years or so, but for now I think Romney’s on the fast track to loserdom obscurity.

  20. 20
    JGabriel says:

    __
    __
    mistermiix @ top:

    Garry Wills’ fairly brutal assessment of Mitt Romney’s future, where he tries, and fails, to find recent campaign loser with as little to offer as Romney …

    That’s because Willis is looking in the wrong place. If he wants to find GOP candidates with as little to offer as Romney, then he shouldn’t be looking at the campaign losers. Instead, he should be looking at the GOP winners (c.f., Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, Reagan, Bush II).

    .

  21. 21
    WereBear says:

    I see Romney as someone who has always cheated his way into achievement. His whole life seems to have been led under pressure to perform; if it’s true that he was supposed to be the fulfillment of the White Horse Prophecy, it would certainly explain his actions and statements.

    The constant drumbeat of “To make wonderful things happen, Mitt just has to show up!” was an article of faith in his campaign from the beginning.

    He’s expected to be a successful businessman, so he gets ahold of money. He’s expected to get at least one office under his belt before the Presidency, so he gets to be Governor of Massachusetts. He’s expected to be a husband and father, so he gets married at the usual time and has five kids.

    Done! There is never a whisper of what Romney really wants. Does he have a soul in there, somehow? I’ve never seen anyone so hollow.

  22. 22
    MattF says:

    The pundits who had something positive to say about Romney (e.g., Brooks, Parker) all did the ‘if only Mitt acted in public the way he does in private’ segue– without, somehow, realizing that there’s a huge problem with that line of reasoning.

  23. 23
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @Zifnab25: ah yes, the other good part of this election: Without “son of president” on their resume, the only place the Mittlets can have that political career at least two of them (Tagg and Josh, IIRC) are said to want is Utah, where the Romneys are neither that special (the True White Horse would not place) nor I believe, that popular. Willard owed no small part of his career to being the son of a man widely admired. Running to avenge the failure of someone no one liked is a poor way to start. /gloaty gloaty gloat gloat

    edited

  24. 24
    PeakVT says:

    Romney’s done. He’s never been a networker or activist among the Republican elite. It’s always been all about Mitt, and now that he’s discovered the whole country doesn’t like him, he’s going to take the millions he never put into this contest and go home to one of his mansions.

  25. 25
    NCSteve says:

    The more you look at Dewey, the more perfect the comparison to Romney. Wealthy, corporate attorney, former governor of a liberal state. This is from his Wikipedia article about the 1948 campaign:

    Indeed, given Truman’s sinking popularity and the Democratic Party’s three-way split (between Truman, Henry A. Wallace, and Strom Thurmond), Dewey had seemed unstoppable. Republicans figured that all they had to do to win was to avoid making any major mistakes, and as such Dewey did not take any risks. He spoke in platitudes, trying to transcend politics. Speech after speech was filled with empty statements of the obvious, such as the famous quote: “You know that your future is still ahead of you.”

    An editorial in the Louisville Courier-Journal summed it up:
    No presidential candidate in the future will be so inept that four of his major speeches can be boiled down to these historic four sentences: Agriculture is important. Our rivers are full of fish. You cannot have freedom without liberty. Our future lies ahead.

  26. 26
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @RoonieRoo: It’s still Rush Limbaugh.

    They may want to change that. Whether they will is not as clear as many people think.

    I still hear a lot of them talking about their big sweep in 2010, so you know, win some lose some, not realizing that it was just a gerrymandered illusion. As hard as it is to imagine, it might actually take a few more losses for them before it really changes.

  27. 27
    Kirk says:

    @SiubhanDuinne: If you mean it, start with a simple but painful trick. If you have used (read or referenced) a book more than once in the last three years, keep it. If you have had the book less than three years you can keep it for now unless you know you won’t read or reference over the next year.

    “I might need it someday” does not count.

    You are allowed slack for things with personal significance – some autographs, Th Book that you shared with a loved one, that sort of thing.

    It works. Hurts, but works.

  28. 28
    Kirk says:

    @Zifnab25: I didn’t say he’d win. I said he may not have faced reality. If he does it will be brutal (the ridicule), but Instill think it even odds right now.

  29. 29
    PurpleGirl says:

    @RoonieRoo: Was Romney ever the “leader” of the Republican Party? Didn’t they have a multiplicity of pundit/entertainer voices telling people what to believe? Did he really explain policies he wanted to enact or guiding principle that were steady and consistent?

  30. 30
    gelfling545 says:

    @SiubhanDuinne: That was one of my retirement projects, too. Retired in 06; library still the same

  31. 31
    Cacti says:

    I think he’ll probably get some sort of sinecure from the Mormon church.

  32. 32
    JGabriel says:

    __
    __
    WereBear:

    Does he have a soul in there, somehow? I’ve never seen anyone so hollow.

    That’s such an unfair characterization. I’m sure Romney’s innards are just filled with circuitry and pistons.

    .

  33. 33
    Enhanced Voting techniques says:

    After reading about the utter delusion Mittens ran his campaign under I suspect Severely Elder Statesman Romney is going to be a laugh to watch. My bet is Romney is going to attempt to act like he is an ex-president; write a book, set up a library and foundations, attempt to give advice to upcoming Republicans. I don’t see a slot on Faux news for him, beneath the Romney dignity and all that.

    But figure, Romney has never, ever seen the responsibilities of public office, just the privileges.

  34. 34
    hueyplong says:

    I don’t care for the analogies in the original post. Those people (Dewey, Willkie) actually did things on the party or international stage and influenced events in some way, even if only in the short term.

    As early as Wednesday morning, Romney became an unperson to Republicans, Democrats and Americans in general. I’d be surprised if he had a single additional moment of political relevance in his life. It’s difficult even to imagine the subject on which he’d be asked a question by anyone with a microphone.

    The analogy is to current ex-president and unperson George W. Bush, and the difference is that Bush actually did something in terms of presidential activity upon which comment might be made. Romney didn’t.

    Romney long ago repudiated the only thing he ever did (Romneycare) that will have any lasting effect of any kind on the country. It’s possible that future generations will struggle to remember just who it was who lost to Obama in 2012.

    Whether Romney lives to be 100 or dies today, his future political “impact” will be the same. Zero.

  35. 35
    Brother Shotgun of Sweet Reason says:

    @Kirk: So, all those boxes of books that I haven’t unpacked since we moved here in 2003? You’re saying I don’t need to keep them?

    Perish the thought. I’ll be setting up some more bookshelves Real Soon Now.

  36. 36
    Schlemizel says:

    I want to start a fund to have a monument put up to Willard – it really is the Epitaph for the entire GOP – its from the linked column:

    What can be worse than to sell your soul and find it not valuable enough to get anything for it?

  37. 37
    kay says:

    That’s what I don’t understand about the mainstream pundit excuses for Romney’s cowardice.
    What makes him terrible is not his positions (no one knows what they are) it’s that he wanted to be President yet couldn’t stand up for ANYTHING. We saw it again and again and again. Mitt Romney stood there while a GOP debate audience savaged the gay soldier. He passed on Rush Limbaugh’s disgusting attacks on a private citizen. It happened over and over and over. This is a character issue. It can’t be ignored or papered over with ” he’s really a moderate” or “he’s really a good Guy”
    He’s a good Guy when it’s easy and doesn’t carry any risk. Anyone can be that person. That’s a REALLY low bar.

  38. 38
    General Stuck says:

    In five years, Romney will be eligible for the Circus Clown Hall of Fame.

  39. 39
    Robin G. says:

    @brettvk: Agreed. I think he’ll devote himself to the LDS from here on out, which seems to be where his heart (three sizes too small though it is) lies. And he’ll keep growing hos fortune through that time honored tradition of moving it from one bank account to another as interest rates apply.

    I don’t think we’ve heard the last of the Mittlets, though. I see a run for US Senate in Utah in the future for at least one or two of them.

  40. 40
    JGabriel says:

    Wikipedia via NCSteve:

    An editorial in the Louisville Courier-Journal summed it up:
    No presidential candidate in the future will be so inept that four of his major speeches can be boiled down to these historic four sentences: Agriculture is important. Our rivers are full of fish. You cannot have freedom without liberty. Our future lies ahead.

    That editorial was wrong. I give you their future, with an even more inept president:
    I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully.

    .

  41. 41
    Davis X. Machina says:

    @WereBear:

    Has Mitt Romney EVER done anything else but make money?

    You mean “Has Mitt Romney EVER done anything else but accumulate virtue?”

    This is, after all, still America.

  42. 42
    Alex S. says:

    Romney is old. He’ll retire and let his portfolio do the work. Politically, he leaves nothing behind.

  43. 43
    Schlemizel says:

    I read Trumans biography years ago and his comments on Herbert Hoover were eye opening. There was a man run out of office in disgrace, charged with running the country into the ditch, a fool and a bungler.

    But HST knew he was a man with bad friends (It was the GOP after all) who was a hard worker and a decent human being. Truman tapped him to run the recovery effort in Europe after the war an he did a tremendous job.

    That sort of future is impossible to imagine for Hoovers modern equivalent (W) or this fop, Willard Marquise du Mittens, Rmoney

  44. 44
    RoonieRoo says:

    While it is pretty funny and scary that Limbaugh is a leader of the party in some respects, he really isn’t. Romney was the leader while he was the nominee, weak though he was.

    Wouldn’t Boehner be considered the highest ranking in the government right now?

  45. 45
    dr. bloor says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim:

    I still hear a lot of them talking about their big sweep in 2010, so you know, win some lose some, not realizing that it was just a gerrymandered illusion. As hard as it is to imagine, it might actually take a few more losses for them before it really changes.

    Although the gerrymandering has created a situation that isn’t entirely illusory. They held tight to the House this cycle despite losing the aggregate popular vote in House races, and it’s going to take an act of FSM or well-placed tactical nukes to get them out of the majority there.

    I’d hope for some real reform in elections, like proportional voting, before I’d expect the neanderthals to see the light. That, or we’re just going to have to wait for “demographics” to do their magic.

  46. 46
    Cacti says:

    @kay:

    What makes him terrible is not his positions (no one knows what they are) it’s that he wanted to be President yet couldn’t stand up for ANYTHING.

    Mitt’s vision for the Presidency started and stopped with: “Willard M. Romney, 45th President of the United States”.

    He deserved the title. Everything beyond that was an afterthought.

  47. 47
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @Cacti@Enhanced Voting techniques: I think this is close. The acting like an ex-President part definitely, similar to how pathetic loser John McCain lectures Obama now at every opportunity.

    Romney presented this oddly bland, even sort of goofy personality during the most of the campaign, but during that first debate his asshole boss side really came out. You could just see him badgering some CEO of a small company that Bain had just bought: “So do you know exactly how many people you need to fire to bring the balance sheet in line? Do you? Do you? I’m asking you if you know that, do you? Give me a figure. Do you know it? No, you don’t.”

    Any images of him slinking away humiliated and subdued doesn’t fit the real Romney personality.

  48. 48
    Schlemizel says:

    @RoonieRoo:

    They all bow before The great Rush Limbaugh!

    Notice that any gooper who publicly rebukes the one true Lamebrain is forced to grovel before his greatness and beg forgiveness.

  49. 49
    WereBear says:

    @kay: Romney reminds me of a dog who has been trained to do some complicated trick; they do their thing and get a treat.

    The whys and hows don’t enter into it.

  50. 50
    IowaOldLady says:

    Mr. IowaOldLady is watching his tivo of Fox Sunday. You’ll be surprised to learn that the only important political event of this week was the resignation of Petraeus, which apparently is directly related to Benghazi. I had to shut the door so I wouldn’t hear it.

  51. 51
    Cacti says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim:

    Romney presented this oddly bland, even sort of goofy personality during the most of the campaign, but during that first debate his asshole boss side really came out. You could just see him badgering some CEO of a small company that Bain had just bought: “So do you know exactly how many people you need to fire to bring the balance sheet in line? Do you? Do you? I’m asking you if you know that, do you? Give me a figure. Do you know it? No, you don’t.”

    I imagine Mitt in a professional setting to be something like this.

  52. 52
    Or something like that.Suffern Ace says:

    @RoonieRoo: I think boss Norquist is the leader, despite some concern about his Muslim wife.

  53. 53
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @dr. bloor: No it wasn’t illusory in that sense but it was in the sense that they think it was demographics that got them there instead of gerrymandering. I have read that the demographics will overtake even the redistricting, but when is the question.

    They got a sugar rush and think that it was real nourishment, in other words. With a lot of damage to the rest of us along the way, to be sure.

  54. 54
    Enhanced Voting techniques says:

    @Schlemizel: Hoover was a good candidate for that because he successfully ran the recovery for Europe, disaster relief in the US in the ’20s and famine relief in the Ukrainian during the great famine there. The reason Hoover is so reviled is because, of any president this country has ever had, he was the best equipped to deal with the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl. Instead, he sat on his hands because he bought into the bootstraps bullshit.

  55. 55
    kay says:

    @Cacti:

    To me, reading Kathleen Parker, she may as well say “Mitt Romney would be a good President if he were a completely different person”

    Well, YEAH, I guess so. I got news for her. That was a long run. Years and years. We KNOW what he is. There isn’t some better more honorable Romney. He’s in his sixties. We would have seen it by now.

  56. 56
    hueyplong says:

    RoonieRoo, I think you describe the GOP as it should have been but was not. I don’t think it’s either funny or merely witty to call Rush Limbaugh the leader of the GOP. Unless and until he savages one of his own and that guy does not either conform his behavior accordingly or flat out apologize in public, Rush Limbaugh is in the hunt to be called the de facto leader of the Republican Party.

    It’s not altogether improper to call the right wing media the leader of the party. They drive the “factual” world upon which party action is taken, and we’re only now seeing that do something other than work for them electorally.

    If I had to pick an actual holder of public office, I’d go with McConnell. Boehner’s every move seems calculated to keep Cantor’s shiv from penetrating his back, so it’s hard to call a guy acting so reactively the party’s leader.

  57. 57
    dmsilev says:

    To me, the more interesting question is what will Paul Ryan do having been given a temporary national stage.

    I suppose he could run for President in 2016, though the odds are against it working out for him; out of curiosity, I went back through the last 100 years worth of elections. There are only three losing VP candidates who went on to get the nomination in a future cycle: FDR, Bob Dole, and Walter Mondale. Two of those lost in the general.

  58. 58
    Schlemizel says:

    @Or something like that.Suffern Ace:

    Muslim wife you say? Hmmmmmmmm, doesn’t Sharia prohibit taxation as immoral?

    Damn I wish I could start that rumor & make it fly – wingnut head exploding all across the country!

  59. 59
    Or something like that.Suffern Ace says:

    @hueyplong: The closest is probably Dukakkis. have you ever heard of an elected official turning to Dukakkis? Has he ever been even asked to play party gadfly?

  60. 60
    Bill E Pilgrim says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim: I haven’t the slightest idea how the @cacti part got in there, morning stumblefingers. Was a reply to EVT.

  61. 61
    Alex S. says:

    @RoonieRoo:

    I would agree that it’s probably Boehner right now. He is the last man standing. Though it’s probably Jeb’s party if he wants it.
    I’d like to know how the Supreme Court judges influence the parties. The highest ranking republican in general is Justice Roberts, after all (and Ben Bernanke, but he doesn’t matter).

  62. 62
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @IowaOldLady: What kind of screens or shields was it Captain Kirk used to call on Mr Sulu to put up, that would get Scottie yelling “She can’t hold, captain!”? In my mind’s eye, I see Britt Hume yelling to Brett Baier and Megan Kelly “Close the episteme! Seal it off!”

    Eric Cantor, the House majority leader, said Saturday an F.B.I. employee whom his staff described as a whistle-blower told him about Mr. Petraeus’s affair and a possible security breach in late October, which was after the investigation had begun.
    “I was contacted by an F.B.I. employee concerned that sensitive, classified information may have been compromised and made certain Director Mueller was aware of these serious allegations and the potential risk to our national security,” Mr. Cantor said in a statement.

    From the NYT

  63. 63
    PurpleGirl says:

    New York named a major roadway (the Thruway) for Gov. Dewey.

    Will Massachusetts ever name anything for Romney?

  64. 64
    jurassicpork says:

    Well, at least liberals can engage in the schadenfreude over the fact that poor Mitt will have to slink back to his quarter billion dollar fortune and five mansions.

    I can’t stand listening to the bellyaching from right wing nut jobs who keep insisting that Christie, Sandy, Democrat voter suppression, etc. are responsible for Obama’s “squeaker” of a win. Hence, my open letter to them, Democracy Isn’t For Wimps.

  65. 65
    different-church-lady says:

    Well, the two examples you cited apparently had enough to offer that the presidents who vanquished them offered them roles. What could Romney do for Obama? Be ambassador to the Cayman Islands?

  66. 66
    Schlemizel says:

    @PurpleGirl:

    An outhouse at the roadside rest on the Mass Turnpike, it will be the one with no paper in the stalls

  67. 67
  68. 68
    kay says:

    @WereBear:

    That’s what amazed me about that slick, expensive biographical film they put out. That was THE BEST of Mitt Romney. He’s nice to his family and people he knows, likes and (mostly) shares a religion with. All of that IS EASY. It’s the bare minimum.

  69. 69
    PurpleGirl says:

    @Schlemizel: More importantly, it frowns on things like interest. The Old Testament also frowns on interest, or as it would say “making money off of a dead thing (money is not a living entity)”.

  70. 70
    Fluke bucket says:

    @Alex S.: retire from what? The only thing that has ever worked for him is his portfolio.

  71. 71
    gf120581 says:

    @dmsilev: Yeah, I don’t put much stock in the “Paul Ryan is a presidential contender” talk. You only have to look at Sarah Palin to see how ridiculous that is.

    Even those three examples you bring up don’t work. FDR and Bob Dole didn’t get the nomination until a long time after they’d run (12 years for FDR, 20 years for Dole) and when they were known respectively as the popular Governor of New York and the Senate Majority Leader than as failed running mates. And Walter Mondale was an actual former Veep, not just a running mate.

    No, in my view, Ryan is as irrelevant now as his former boss Jack Kemp was after 1996. The only difference is that he still has his House seat, but I wonder if he may get bored with that and quit for Fox News.

  72. 72
    Xecky Gilchrist says:

    @dan: A man who did nothing but serve his own ambition his entire life is not going to turn suddenly to serving others.

    Oh, I dunno.

  73. 73
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @RoonieRoo: I’d say Boehner is the highest ranking elected Republican right now, officially and in fact, especially if Reid manages to get through some filibuster reform. I gather no one’s even talking about getting rid of it entirely, which I’m ambivalent about, but they want to re-instate the ‘talking filibuster’, and you have to filibuster an actual bill, you can’t block debate on it, which I think is good.
    I believe the rule now is you have to get sixty votes to overcome a filibuster. I’d like to see that changed to needing forty votes to create one. No more hiding behind abstentions, no more “Democrats failed to overcome…”, rather “Republicans voted to block Law X or Nominee Y”

    But I think because what Boehner, who knows he’s risen as high as he’s going to, fears above all else is revolt from the Cantor-Ryan wing of his own caucus, I suspect he fears Limbaugh, and O’Reilly, and Norquist, and Vigeurie, and Robertson. If he had the guts to lose, he’d be pretty powerful for a week or two.

  74. 74
    jeffreyw says:

    @fourmorewars: I, for one, take great pleasure in living in one of the succeeding States. I was not thinking about petitioning for recognition, though. All part of “a life lived well is the best revenge” mind set – Not one to toot my own horn, & etc.

  75. 75
    IowaOldLady says:

    @gf120581: I think you’re right about Ryan. House members are often not prepared for electoral battle beyond the local level. Ryan’s inexperience with the national press showed.

  76. 76
    RoonieRoo says:

    @hueyplong: McConnel is certainly stronger than Boehner. Do you think it matters that most negotiating will have to occur with Boehner since the house will be the choke point? I’m also curious if Cantor is going to be shiving Boehner or if he will back down.

    I do get what you are saying about Limbaugh. Where he definitely has great influence over the party and there policy, that does not make him the leader of the party.

  77. 77
    Cacti says:

    @gf120581:

    No, in my view, Ryan is as irrelevant now as his former boss Jack Kemp was after 1996. The only difference is that he still has his House seat, but I wonder if he may get bored with that and quit for Fox News.

    Ryan has also never shown that he can win an election in anything larger than a Congressional District. He couldn’t swing Wisconsin in Mitt’s direction in a national election.

    He’s done as a national contender. His future is in wresting away Newt’s title of “dumb person’s idea of a smart person” on the grift circuit.

  78. 78
    Cacti says:

    @Xecky Gilchrist:

    Oh, I dunno.

    I imagine Melinda leaned pretty hard on Bill for the philanthropy.

    Does anyone see Queen Ann wanting Mitt to give up a cent to “you people”?

  79. 79
    Poopyman says:

    @PurpleGirl: A public hospital, if there’s any ironic justice in the world.

  80. 80
    RoonieRoo says:

    @Jim, Foolish Literalist: Okay, I was thinking Boehner was technically highest ranking. Thanks.

    Not sure why this has peaked my interest. I think it is because I think an internal battle in the party is coming and I might want to have my popcorn ready.

  81. 81
    NotMax says:

    (best George Takei imitation) Oh, my.

    Conservative Weekly Standard columnist Bill Kirstol said it won’t kill the country to raise taxes on millionaires during an appearance on “Fox News Sunday.” Kristol said that after a bad night on Election Day, Republicans should reassess their positions and be open to new ideas.
    __
    “Don’t scream and yell when one person says, ‘you know what, it won’t kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires.’ It really won’t, I don’t think,” Kristol said.  Source

    A small corner of Hell offers ice skating.

  82. 82
    dmsilev says:

    @gf120581: Yeah, that was sort of the take-away lesson of the history. ‘Failed VP candidate’ is in and of itself not a highway to the nomination. It’s often a highway to a humiliating failure in the primaries though (c.f. Joe Lieberman finishing in a “three way tie for third place”, aka “fifth”, in the 2004 NH primary).

  83. 83
    Brachiator says:

    @mistermix:

    Dewey pretty much stayed on the sidelines, turning down a nomination from LBJ for the Supreme Court, and concentrating on making money as a corporate lawyer. I imagine Mitt will follow a similar path.

    Uh, Romney has spent much of his life making money. That’s the path he has long been on. Running for president was a nice little hobby for him.

    If you only meant that Romney will retire from politics, I agree. And he doesn’t have the brains to be on the Supreme Court.

    Also, Romney is kinda old, despite all appearances. If the Republicans find a way to win in 2016, I could see Romney being offered a job as ambassador to Mexico, France or Great Britain, but that’s about it for him.

    ETA: anybody going to watch the Sunday news shows? I imagine that the Fox show will be a funeral, with voodoo denialism used like magic to try to reanimate the rotting corpse of Republican defeat.

  84. 84
    Or something like that.Suffern Ace says:

    @NotMax: Oh Christ. If he were a Sicilian, I’d be worried. His Predictions are always wrong….so is he saying that knowing that someone would take that advice and poison us all? Where is the poison glass?

  85. 85
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @WereBear:

    Which is one of their very serious problems. Limbaugh knows nothing, nothing about the nuts and bolts of policy. He’s a pure bullshitter, and his bullshit damages his brand, it doesn’t help it.

  86. 86
    Kirbster says:

    I predict a board of directors slot at Marriott International for the Mittster.

  87. 87
    Bago says:

    @PeakVT: building a better tomorrow, tomorrow?

  88. 88
    Brachiator says:

    @Cacti:

    Does anyone see Queen Ann wanting Mitt to give up a cent to “you people”?

    The Romneys used to support Planned Parenthood. I always wondered if politically moderate philanthropy was hidden away in those unseen tax returns.

  89. 89
    Lojasmo says:

    @PeakVT:

    discovered the whole country doesn’t like him

    Seems he might end up with 47% of the vote. Irony.

  90. 90
    Xecky Gilchrist says:

    @Cacti: Does anyone see Queen Ann wanting Mitt to give up a cent to “you people”?

    Good point. I was just gobsmacked when Bill Gates showed he could be talked into doing anything at all other than scorched-earth destruction of everything Not Windows.

  91. 91
    MikeBoyScout says:

    Let’s be clear. There is one thing, and maybe only one thing, most Republicans and Democrats can agree upon in early November 2012; The Romney Legacy is a legacy of EPIC FAIL.

    Good riddance to bad rubbish.

  92. 92
    Soylent Green is FReepers says:

    Has anybody else noticed that at RedState lately every time they use the word “majority” it’s in quotes? As in:

    This is, of course, despite the fact that Obama’s ‘majority’ of the popular vote (as of the one of the most recent tallies) consists of 50.5% who voted for him versus 47.9% who voted against him nationwide.

    and

    Well, actually, Mr. President, 47.9 percent don’t agree with your approach. However, because a “majority” voted for you…

    Seriously, if 50%+1 isn’t a “majority” in your “dictionary” then maybe you aren’t “in touch” with “reality.”

  93. 93
    Xecky Gilchrist says:

    @Soylent Green is FReepers: Has anybody else noticed that at RedState lately every time they use the word “majority” it’s in quotes?

    Interesting. Those look to me like snot quotes, which mean that the text enclosed is to be read in the most annoying, spoiled-brat nasal whine you can muster. They don’t necessarily mean that the writer disagrees with whatever’s enclosed, just thinks it should be dragged behind a truck or something like that.

    Hard to say, with people whose thought processes and composition skills are so sewage-bemurked.

  94. 94
    JPL says:

    @NotMax: Wonder if he’d accept a flat tax of 28 percent on earned and unearned income for millionaires…
    See I can lower the top rate..

  95. 95
    bemused says:

    @IowaOldLady:

    Is MrIOL a Fox fan or does he tivo it for amusement?

  96. 96
    Or something like that.Suffern Ace says:

    @Soylent Green is FReepers: As if the bushes were known for reaching across the aisle.

  97. 97
    aimai says:

    @brettvk:

    I think he will either 1) retire or 2) move back to Utah and run for governor and then for one of the top jobs within the Mormon Church (to the extent that you can run for that). I think he needs to retrench, emotionally, and mere money isn’t going to do it for him. But I also think that he may have fatally blotted his copy book with his Mormon comperes because of everythign that came out, at the last minute, about how he used his CRUT to basically grift off the Mormon Church. I am really, really, sure that although the Church hierarchy knew he wasn’t really tithing ten percent to them (for pete’s sake) the rest of the body of the church and lower level mormons were completely unaware of the special dispensation for important people–just like the rank and file scientologists are unaware that the celebrity scientologists get special treatment.

    aimai

  98. 98
    dmsilev says:

    @Soylent Green is FReepers: Their temper tantrum is kind of cute. Still, if it keeps going we’re going to have to send them to their room for a bit of a time out.

  99. 99
    IowaOldLady says:

    @bemused</a@bemused:

    Is MrIOL a Fox fan or does he tivo it for amusement?

    Amusement. He laughs at way more things than I do, which is why he dragged me to the Roller Derby last night.

  100. 100
    Brachiator says:

    @Soylent Green is FReepers:

    Well, actually, Mr. President, 47.9 percent don’t agree with your approach. However, because a “majority” voted for you…

    Did these clowns ever write anything similar about Dubya?

    Oh, well.

  101. 101
    NotMax says:

    @jurassicpork

    Speaking of schadenfreude:

    Quoted from concession speech given in the name of your publicly supported candidate.

    “Sacramento will be destroyed” by disasters of Nature next year.

    “Right now,” we are in the “coldest winter in human history.”

    Build “a million solar-powered houses in each state.” (ed. – Quite the bonanza for the 7 states (and D.C. as the 8th area with EVs) whose entire population is less than a million.)

    “Will be calling President Obama to offer “congratulations” and “our condolences.”

    Obama has “won a job he is unqualified to do.”

  102. 102
    Bago says:

    @Cacti: I doubt the impetus was that. I would like to think of it as a Carnegie moment. You’ve won, you have the high score, and you’re going to die soon. What kind of memory do you want the world to have of you after your organs fail?

  103. 103
    Uncle Cosmo says:

    @Craigo:

    om Dewey… drafted Eisenhower in 1952 specifically to kneecap frontunner Bob Taft (of Taft-Hartley infamy). Since there was essentially no way the GOP wasn’t winning in 1952, we should at least thank him for that.

    Well, things might’ve been pretty interesting if he hadn’t–considering that Taft died at the end of July 1953 from cancer that was asymptomatic until earlier that year. The question is who would’ve been Vice President at the time. Given the importance of the California delegation in the actual process, one possibility is Governor Earl Warren…but another is its junior Senator, a young man in a hurry named Richard Milhous Nixon. Imagine a world in which Nixon became President in 1953….

  104. 104
    Taylor says:

    @Brachiator:

    I could see Romney being offered a job as ambassador to Mexico, France or Great Britain

    The Brits will not soon forget his comments about their running of the Olympics.

    Ambassador to Luxemburg, or Cayman Islands as already noted, seems more appropriate.

  105. 105
    WereBear says:

    @Villago Delenda Est: Limbaugh knows nothing, nothing about the nuts and bolts of policy. He’s a pure bullshitter, and his bullshit damages his brand, it doesn’t help it.

    I forget where I read it, but some R leader/pundit was lamenting that “these talk radio guys, they are making millions but damaging the party.”

    And I thought, Geez people, I thought that was your philosophy in a nutshell.

  106. 106
    bemused says:

    @IowaOldLady:

    He has a higher tolerance level than I would have….I can only stand about 5 minutes of video Fox greatest stupidity hits here and there.

  107. 107
    El Cid says:

    @WereBear: Yeah, not to mention, if Rush Limbaugh is so great a businessman he can make such a fortune, how can he be wrong about politics?

    If you make a lot of money and are a right winger, it means that you’re right, by definition, by heavenly decree.

  108. 108
    hoodie says:

    @aimai: yep. Multi-level marketing seems to be the preferred form of organization in right wing circles, it’s infused in everything from churches to campaign organizations. OT, but anybody catch Chris Hayes this morning? He had on this smug asshole from Bain. Hayes is talking about the failure of Republican messaging and asks him straightforwardly about whether he bought into the “makers vs. takers” theme. Initially he says he’s not down with that construction, but 15 minutes later he resurrects it as “investors vs. consumers.” They cannot get past this incessant need to create hierarchies, i.e., creating a rationalization for stepping on someone else to get ahead. It’s in the DNA.

  109. 109
    maya says:

    I see a for-profit Mitt Romney On-Line High School mill conducted exclusively through Comcast in his future.

  110. 110
    bemused says:

    Anyone think of the possibility of one (or more) of Mitt’s boys climbing onto the political train with eventual presidential hopes? Fourth time trying for the WH could be the charm after Romney Sr one time and Mitt two times failures.

  111. 111

    I’m hoping this experience has soured the entire Romney clan on running for office, but i’m not counting on it. I’m guessing we’ll see one of his kids run one day. Hill

  112. 112
    NotMax says:

    @Hillary Rettig

    Discomfiting thought that they could conceivably fan out and run for 5 governorships.

  113. 113
    PurpleGirl says:

    @hoodie: Not so much hierarchies as bifurcating the population into two oppositional groups: investors v. consumers and makers v. takers.

  114. 114
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    20 years ago, I saw a magazine cover that had a picture of Rush Limbaugh on it, and the text read “The leader of the opposition”.

    He’s had this role as the default leader of the GOP for a long time, which helps explain the long term damage to the Republican party that we’ve seen. The rot started with Nixon, was helped along by Reagan, and has only been getting worse. The effort by the likes of Buckley, Weyrich, Viguerie, and Norquist to transform the GOP in to the party that stands on the tracks and tries to stop the train that is the future has turned it into a rump party of fearful, resentful old white men, pining for an imaginary past.

  115. 115
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @NotMax:

    Ala the Bush Crime Family, which simultaneously held the governorships of Texas and Florida.

  116. 116
    Or something like that.Suffern Ace says:

    @NotMax: That’s unreal. Geebus.

  117. 117
    Hill Dweller says:

    Why is the Village trying so hard to convince the public Obama doesn’t have a mandate?

  118. 118
    Patricia Kayden says:

    @kay: You forgot his birther “joke” where he boasted to his Michigan supporters that noone had ever asked him for his birth certificate.

    He’s a disgusting human being and I’m glad he lost soundly.

  119. 119
    aimai says:

    @Or something like that.Suffern Ace:

    Yes, is that real? What level of disgusting cowardice would it take for Jill Stein not to make her own speech? I note that at the bottom the thing is defined/tagged as “comedy.” Can it really be for real?

    Also: I want to add to my predictions that the Romney boys and Anne split from Mitt in some unobvious way–like Ann starts living primarily at one house while he lives at another and one or more of the boys comes out as either liberal (ish) or gay or both.

    aimai

  120. 120
    Or something like that.Suffern Ace says:

    @Hill Dweller: Because 1) they are in income tax brackets that will pay more in taxes. 2) with their rush to influence the election by creating Mittmentum almost single handedly defeated by Nate Silver, they lost Tuesday as well. Plus they’re all a bunch of cowboy dreaming st. Ronnie lovers now. If you don’t win like st Ronnie, no one really loves you.

  121. 121
    maya says:

    @Hill Dweller:

    Why is the Village trying so hard to convince the public Obama doesn’t have a mandate?

    Because the majority of old, white, beer gutted, mans dated Romney?

  122. 122
    hoodie says:

    @PurpleGirl: You can’t have hierarchies without differentiation. You define the groups to support the hierarchies. For example, investors are “better” than consumers and thus deserve disproportionate power, despite the fact that investors in large part rely on consumers for their wealth, and despite the fact that many of these “consumers” actually are making investments in things like their families, maintenance of our society and education of our children, while many of these “investors” are actually consuming much of the productive capacity of our country and it’s irreplaceable resources so that they can be more powerful.

  123. 123
    kay says:

    @Patricia Kayden:

    There were so many moments like that. There was no reason he had to go on 60 minutes and spout that ridiculous Bush-era nonsense about emergency rooms being a health care safety net. HE KNOWS BETTER. He doesn’t lack knowledge. He lacks character. They couldn’t “fix” that.

    He had SO MANY opportunities to reveal the the “real” better Mitt Romney. He passed on all of them.

  124. 124
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Hill Dweller:

    The vile parasites are afraid their taxes might go up.

  125. 125
    Chris says:

    @WereBear:

    La Cosa Nostra probably thinks so.

    Or did you mean an *honest* skilled job?

  126. 126
    Sister Rail Gun of Warm Humanitarianism says:

    @fourmorewars: I know there’s a petition gathering signatures on whitehouse.gov for Louisiana secession.

  127. 127
    Chris says:

    @Craigo:

    Yeah, from what I remember reading about Dewey, I don’t think he was nearly the waste of a human body Mittens has been. Still would’ve voted Truman, mind you.

  128. 128
    Jewish Steel says:

    @aimai:

    Also: I want to add to my predictions that the Romney boys and Anne split from Mitt in some unobvious way—like Ann starts living primarily at one house while he lives at another and one or more of the boys comes out as either liberal (ish) or gay or both.

    That’s solid, aimai. I’ll co-sign this prediction. I’ve thought much the same thing.

  129. 129
    handsmile says:

    @WereBear:

    I think you may be referring to remarks made by David From on Friday’s “Morning Joe”:

    “The problem with the Republican leaders is that they are cowards…The real locus of the problem is the Republican activist base and the Republican donor base…Republicans have been fleeced and exploited and lied to by a conservative entertainment complex.”

    Rush Limbaugh and Roger Ailes are the de facto leaders of the GOP; Grover Norquist may well be the third leg of this diabolical stool (in all its meanings). There is not a single GOP officeholder or aspirant who dares to go up against them. Such omnipotence is a reliable measure of leadership status.

    David Atkins at Digby’s blog has an excellent post on Frum’s eviscerating analysis and the befuddled response of Joe and his fraternity buddies:

    http://digbysblog.blogspot.com.....le-15.html

  130. 130
    Gindy51 says:

    @PurpleGirl: Not even a road stop outhouse, poor Willard. not even good enough to shit in.

  131. 131
    andy says:

    @WereBear: The skill is avoiding the inevitable revenge. It’s sure to happen sometime. You take away somebody’s livelihood, in a way you take away somebody’s life. Why do you think the Office Shooting is so common nowadays?

  132. 132

    @fourmorewars: Awesome, let ’em go. And in the next natural disaster, we won’t be responsible for FEMA money for them.

  133. 133
    Chris says:

    @Schlemizel:

    From what little I’ve read of him, Hoover reminds me of Louis XVI or Mikhail Gorbachev – not all that bad a guy, certainly not as bad as most of his predecessors, but ultimately overwhelmed by events and paying for the flaws in all the sins of the fucked up system he inherited.

  134. 134
    Gindy51 says:

    @aimai: And that in a nut shell is why he got less Mormon votes than Bush did.

  135. 135
    gVOR08 says:

    Obama should offer Romney the only federal public service job for which Romney has solid experience. Put Romney in charge of coordinating and promoting the implimentation of Obamacare. I don’t know if Romney’s head would explode, but several other would.

  136. 136
    JoyfulA says:

    @Craigo: Dewey was apparently more successful than the Democrats, who also offered Ike the job.

  137. 137
    trollhattan says:

    Willard can go back to France and this time, pay those heathens to join the church.

    That would be cool.

  138. 138
    M31 says:

    about the Obama mandate, Dick Morris said it perfectly the other day: they were expecting a 325 Electoral vote Romney landslide, but what we got was a 332 Electoral vote Obama squeaker.

  139. 139
    Schlemizel says:

    @Chris:

    I don’t think you could find a former President more reviled in his time that Hoover. Thats not to say he was a bad guy or incompetent only that he was the guy who bought the BS of the 1% and continued the process of appointing crooks and incompetents. Really the only difference between him and Boy Blunder was Hoover was not a bad guy & he was competent, just not as President.

    Had Truman not seen Hoovers abilities and used them he would have remained on histories scrap heap

  140. 140
    AA+ Bonds says:

    Garry Wills’ fairly brutal assessment of Mitt Romney’s future

    He will no doubt return to augmenting his vast and hidden wealth, with no more pesky questions about where around the world it is stashed, or what taxes (if any) he paid, carefully sheltered from the rules his fellow citizens follow.

    :|

  141. 141
    AA+ Bonds says:

    But will his millions hug him at night? No, wait, his wife will hug him at night because he’s not in jail where he belongs

  142. 142
    M31 says:

    Interestingly, it’s been shown that if a family has a lot of boys, the younger ones are increasingly likely to be gay. A hormonal shift in the mother is thought to be the likely cause.

    So who’s the youngest Mittling and how high does he ping your gaydar?

  143. 143
    PeakVT says:

    @handsmile: Scarborough’s reaction to Frum’s second mini-rant cracked me up: “uh, hey, so, Chuck Todd…”

  144. 144
    trollhattan says:

    @NotMax:
    Holy f@#k, we’re going to have a combo megaquake AND flood at once, next year? I gotta list the house and start packing, stat!

  145. 145
    hoodie says:

    @handsmile: I caught that Morning Schmoe and was taken aback by how frank Frum was and amused how Schmoe and his buddies tried to change the subject because it hit them where they live. Gerson actually has said similar things, though not as starkly as Frum. However, the thing is that guys like Frum can’t explain is why they just don’t become Democrats, or at least independents aligned with Democrats. Obama is closer to the Republican president they’ve always wanted, and there are plenty of conservadems that represent their interests better than anyone in the Republican Party. Their interests would be better served if they hastened the demise of the Republican Party, as that would inevitably lead to a splintering of Democrats into left and right factions, with the Overton Window pushed back to the left. There are too many established warlords in the Republican Party to save it, and Democrats already serve the interests of those who aren’t in the camps of those warlords.

  146. 146
    JoyfulA says:

    @Cacti: A lot of the Gates philanthropy is great, but a lot of it has gone to develop and fund charter schools.

  147. 147
    Bill D. says:

    @Bill E Pilgrim:

    I still hear a lot of them talking about their big sweep in 2010, so you know, win some lose some, not realizing that it was just a gerrymandered illusion.

    Please, redistricting happens the year after the new census data come out, as the races start before those data are even available. The districts that people were running in during 2010 were largely drawn in 2001 after the 2000 elections.

    Actually, it was the big off-year wins in state legislative races around the country in November 2010, due to poor Democratic turnout, which gave the Republicans the political muscle to do so much gerrymandering in 2011. It’s the 2012 districts which are gerrymandered and which gave Republican candidates for the House an unfair advantage as documented by the vote totals.

  148. 148
    AA+ Bonds says:

    @hoodie:

    However, the thing is that guys like Frum can’t explain is why they just don’t become Democrats, or at least independents aligned with Democrats.

    Because after losing their meal ticket in the conservative media, people like Frum have to keep that gimmick or no one will pay them to speak on Fox or MSNBC

  149. 149
    Jim, Foolish Literalist says:

    @handsmile: Good. Lord. That clip is nine minutes of pure Villagery.

    Joe Scarborough, Chuck Todd, David Gregory, Mark Halperin and David Frum… and a young woman I don’t recognize. Who says not one word, and is not asked one question, for nine plus minutes.

    That fucking douche parade (with apologies to the one I don’t recoginze) is from EvenTheLiberalMSNBC?

    Well, shut my mouth. David Frum is pointing out (almost, mostly) pointing out that Republicans have no platform for people who aren’t, like most people on TV (a pet peeve of mine) economically secure (rich) and health insured. My apologies to the Grumpy Code Monkey.

    Mark Halperin: “I’m a fan of John Cornyn”. Not surprising, but can you imagine if a ‘straight reporter” said “I’m a fan of Patrick Leahy”, or John Kerry, or Dick Durbin.

  150. 150
    scav says:

    @NotMax: Ow Ow Ow Ow Ow. Many, Most! of the greens I’ve met deserve better. I broke down at the litany of disasters that were ravishing this country. I’m giving up on the comment here, that wreck is delusional. We need better parties across the spectrum for this thing to work better.

  151. 151
    Chris says:

    @Schlemizel:

    I don’t think you could find a former President more reviled in his time that Hoover.

    You think the Carter-hate’s been as bad? That one’s been pretty intense in the last thirty years (with less justification, but it’s out there).

  152. 152
    redshirt says:

    I don’t give W. much credit for anything, but I was gladdened to see him stay far away for the last 4 years.

    He could have done a lot of damage if he tried to be a shadow President or something similar.

  153. 153
    LD50 says:

    @M31: no doubt about it, Ben is the one who’ll come out as gay or liberal: http://www.buzzfeed.com/jpmoor.....ns-a-guide

  154. 154
    LD50 says:

    @Chris: Hoover hate was worse. Carter hate was something the GOP had to remind everyone of, since Carter didn’t actually ruin anyone’s lives. Hoover beat off and said a lot of appallingly 1%er type shit for the first 3 years of the Depression while people’s lives crashed and burned. People hated Hoover.

  155. 155
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @Kirk: Thanks. That sounds like a good approach for me.

    As the child and grandchild of bookstore owners, I ended up acquiring or inheriting a slew of first editions, autographed volumes, etc., so I do need to see what I’m dealing with before I start merrily pitching.

  156. 156
    The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge says:

    @Chris:

    Yeah, I think the Carter-Hate has been much worse. Once Roosevelt was elected (and reelected 61/49!) there was no percentage in demonizing Hoover any more, but the imaginary Jimmy Carter the right wing has created has been a great whipping boy for 30 years now.

    Of course, what’s killing them is that President Carter is the most respected and beloved American around the world. It eats away at their innards….

  157. 157
    SiubhanDuinne says:

    @gelfling545:

    You’re not very inspiring :-P

  158. 158
  159. 159
    Lurking Canadian says:

    @Hill Dweller: There’s a D after his name and his election is tainted by an excess of melanin and a deficiency of Y-chromosomes.

  160. 160
    Mnemosyne says:

    @LD50:

    I’ve gotta agree with you that the Hoover-hate is more persistent. They’re still singing “We’d Like to Thank You, Herbert Hoover” on stages all over the United States every week. So far, no one has written a hit musical about how awful the Carter years were.

  161. 161
    WereBear says:

    @redshirt: I believe W had a LOT of help in staying sub rosa. His own party doesn’t want him running around reminding people he existed.

  162. 162
    JosieJ says:

    @kay:

    There were so many moments like that. There was no reason he had to go on 60 minutes and spout that ridiculous Bush-era nonsense about emergency rooms being a health care safety net. HE KNOWS BETTER. He doesn’t lack knowledge. He lacks character. They couldn’t “fix” that.
    He had SO MANY opportunities to reveal the the “real” better Mitt Romney. He passed on all of them.

    That’s because there was no “real” better Mitt Romney. We kept searching beneath the surface to find one, only to find that he was all surface.

    His most enduring legacy will be that multi-millionaires who run for president in the future will no longer be required to disclose the source, or even the extent, of their wealth. It figures that a man who’s all surface would make it harder to penetrate beneath the surface of others.

  163. 163
    LD50 says:

    @Mnemosyne: Yeah, Hoover hate was a very grassroots thing. Everyday people whose lives had bottomed out despised him for doing nothing at a horrible time in American history. They even named a type of shantytown after him, FFS. Carter hate, on the other hand, is something kept alive by the GOP as a thing that people who are obsessed with politics are supposed to feel. Most people don’t hate Carter, at worst they feel he was an ineffectual president.

    This is all obscured by the fact that the people who hated Hoover are almost all dead now, but it was still something my parents could invoke as recently as the 1970s.

  164. 164
    Ted & Hellen says:

    Mitt will be non existent within a month.

  165. 165
    blingee says:

    I look forward to reading about (will never watch) his appearance on Celebrity Apprentice along with all the other has beens crying out for attention. Trump included.

  166. 166
    redshirt says:

    You know, Mitt seems clueless enough that he might just plow ahead and pretend he’s all Senior Statesmen. Hello Dancin’ Dave? Got a seat open next to Johnny Mac?

  167. 167
    catclub says:

    @dmsilev: I think Paul Ryan is as close to chief of the party as anyone. They are all talking about the thing he is supposed to be an expert on – the deficit and cutting budgets.

    The teflon with which he slid away from any connection with the recent unhappiness is notable ( at least to me).

  168. 168
    FlipYrWhig says:

    Nothing more than a hunch, but I have a feeling that Romney will be tapped to be the figurehead of a major charity, like when Elizabeth Dole was head of the Red Cross.

  169. 169
    catclub says:

    @Jewish Steel: Wow, I don’t see either of those things, unless they also renounce Mormonism ( and whatever inheritance they would have coming.)

    The one thing Mitt never wavered on was Mormonism. I thought that if he could convincingly lie about a profound conversion experience,
    he could get a whole lot of baptists VERY enthusiastic. he never did it. He would lose mormons. Wasn’t there some quote about
    “something something is worth a mass”?

    he did less well than McCain in the south, even though those folks were primed with 4 years of Obama hate.

  170. 170
    DPS says:

    There is no “Mitt Romney” constituency that wants to see him do anything. The only reason anybody ever supported him was that they thought he could win and, after the primaries, because they wanted to win the election. There is no post-election demand for Mitt, no army that he leads behind him. The best he could do is put some of that money towards something worthwhile, and I think we know he won’t do that.

  171. 171
    Elie says:

    @JosieJ:

    I disagree about the financial disclosure. Future millionaires will have a lot of pressure to disclose even though Romney refused. He also lost — significantly. If he had won — maybe. Now — a whole lot of crap is going to be challenged — the continual lying, the cheating on taxes and full out frontal racism. The shit didn’t work and nothing kills strategy more than having failed before. Oh I am sure that they might try it.. like everything else… but their whole approach was all loser and they know it!

  172. 172
    Elie says:

    @FlipYrWhig:

    I don’t think so. This wasn’t a “regular” loss. He not only embarrassed himself, but the Republicans also embarrassed themselves. They not only failed, they looked unbearably stupid and un-modern — No organization is going to want to have that associated with their mission. Nope — he is headed home to send his cars up and down the elevator.

  173. 173
    Jeffro says:

    @NotMax: wasn’t that the plot of a great Clive Cussler novel? The corrupt children of a Dr No-type assumed power in something like Egypt and Mexico??

    Oh wait, duh, more obviously: W and Jeb…

  174. 174
    Chris says:

    @The Very Reverend Battleaxe of Knowledge:

    He’s another one who kinda reminds me of Gorbachev. Hated at home, but beloved in the world at large.

  175. 175
    JosieJ says:

    @Elie:

    I hope you’re right, Elie. I’m not very sanguine, simply because Romney came very close to getting away with it.

  176. 176
    elftx says:

    Anyone else notice the number of ads from financial and pharmaceutical co.’s with a woman and a horse…hehehehe

    Methinks they figured it was all theirs lock stock and barrel.

  177. 177
    Full Metal Wingnut says:

    What fucking squeaker? According to Wikipedia (and some basic arithmetic), Bush beat Kerry by 2.4% of the popular vote, Obama beat Romney by 2.7. So unless the Republicans want to make a similar comment about 04, they should kindly shut the fuck up.

  178. 178
    Xecky Gilchrist says:

    @Villago Delenda Est: 20 years ago, I saw a magazine cover that had a picture of Rush Limbaugh on it, and the text read “The leader of the opposition”.

    I think that that has had a lot to do with the deterioration of the Party. That is, a lot of the leading proponents of the Republicans’ aren’t even politicians; they’re grifters who don’t really have a dog in the political fight. If the Party loses, Limbaugh still wins – he gets to whine and threaten revolution. In fact, he probably does better when the Republicans are out of power.

    It tickles me no end that Rush is getting paid $50MM/yr to point out that the Republicans are dicks.

  179. 179
    Not Sure says:

    @WereBear: I think there should be a stiff penalty charged for someone to repatriate assets. All that money can stay in the Caymans, for all I care.

  180. 180
    Carla H says:

    @Cacti:

    I imagine Melinda leaned pretty hard on Bill for the philanthropy.

    You’d think, but his dad is a philanthropist, too. I wouldn’t be surprised if a good portion of Bill’s giving was learned from his parents.

  181. 181
    trollhattan says:

    @catclub:
    The Onion thinks Republicans will be lead by a white-hot sphere of rage.

    http://www.theonion.com/video/.....f-p,30284/

  182. 182
  183. 183
    Paul says:

    @Full Metal Wingnut:

    What fucking squeaker? According to Wikipedia (and some basic arithmetic), Bush beat Kerry by 2.4% of the popular vote, Obama beat Romney by 2.7. So unless the Republicans want to make a similar comment about 04, they should kindly shut the fuck up.

    Furthermore, if the popular vote mattered one bit, don’t they realize that Obama would have spent all his time in California, New York, Massachusetts, Illinois etc to run up the score? They are pulling the same stupid, illogical trick that Hillary Clinton’s supporters tried in the 2008 primary.

    Bottomline: Obama won the EC in a landslide. The popular vote does not matter (as per the constitution they CLAIM to love so much). And if it had mattered, Obama could easily have run up the score in his states.

  184. 184
    Bex says:

    @Brachiator: Yeah, the Mittster is real popular in Great Britian.

  185. 185
    YellowJournalism says:

    @elftx: Some of those just scream crazy. My favorite is: “Not allow the FDA to regulate premium cigars.”

  186. 186
    YellowJournalism says:

    @NotMax: I don’t know much about Stein, but was she really advocating a “one child per family” rule/law? Because that’s worked so well in China!

  187. 187
    different-church-lady says:

    @Sister Rail Gun of Warm Humanitarianism:

    I know there’s a petition gathering signatures on whitehouse.gov for Louisiana secession.

    I say let ’em go, and then we don’t have to bother redesigning the flag when Peurto Rico comes in.

  188. 188
    John says:

    Dewey didn’t immediately abandon public life. He was still governor of New York in 1948, and was re-elected in 1950. By that point he was an elder statesman of the internationalist eastern establishment wing of the Republican Party, and was a key supporter of Eisenhower in his victory over Taft in 1952. He was apparently partly responsible for the choice of Nixon as Eisenhower’s running mate, and his people took key roles in the Eisenhower administration – both Dulles, the new Secretary of State, and Brownell, the new Attorney General, were old Dewey advisers.

    In 1956, Dewey was also apparently responsible for convincing Eisenhower not to dump Nixon.

  189. 189
    Triassic Sands says:

    It’s worth clicking “Next” at the bottom of the Will’s piece to read Elizabeth Drew’s comments on the real but failed GOP efforts to “steal” the election through voter suppression.

    Romney’s long term reputation should include his campaign’s efforts to suppress Democratic votes; the fact that he failed is a testament to both the determined efforts on the left to prevent another stolen election and Romney’s more or less universal incompetence.

    Note to the anti-democratic thugs in the GOP (aka virtually the entire party): It’s a good idea, when you plan to steal an election, to keep that fact to yourselves; announcing that your latest legislative vote suppressing scheme will deliver your state (PA) to Romney is not a great idea. Jeb Bush and Katherine Harris went about their business a lot more quietly and in the end delivered Florida and the election to brother George.

    In the future, I expect the GOP to invest huge sums of money in “Cones of Silence” since Mitt proved that even behind closed doors in the presence of your most loyal subjects offensive comments may still escape to reach a wider audience.

  190. 190
    elftx says:

    @YellowJournalism:
    I don’t get that one at all..but noticed the few signatures for repeal of NDAA
    I happen to reside in TX and lol at LA having more signatures than us to secede

  191. 191
    Schlemizel says:

    @Chris:

    No, my grandparents and parents remembered Hoover and I grew up in a factory neighborhood. 40 years later they still HATED the guy. People may laugh at Carter or say he was incompetent but never heard the hate for him that I heard for Herbie

  192. 192
    Schlemizel says:

    @LD50: OMG!

    Gaydar firing 5 alarms!

  193. 193
    RSA says:

    @brettvk:

    I don’t think Mitt is stupid. I think he’d like to have a legacy as the sort of international statesman that Jimmy Carter has made himself, but I don’t think he could possibly force himself to be that generous.

    Right, I can just see Mitt showing up at a Habitat for Humanity project.

    On the leadership of the Republican party, I think the conventional wisdom from Carter through Bush II was that the best Presidential candidates were popular governors rather than members of Congress; presumably they had less baggage in the way of hard votes. I don’t know that this applies any more, but maybe a popular Republican governor might try to pull the party together. (Mostly when I think “Republican governor,” though, I think of very bad men.)

  194. 194
    Odie Hugh Manatee says:

    Erick, Son of Erick, is getting over his grief in the usual way crazy wingers do, backwards! He has a post up at Redstate where he has posted a copy of something he wrote a year ago stating that Romney was someone who was on every side of an issue, not a real conservative, lose the election to Obama and be the death of conservatism. The only thing he adds as an update is at the end, where he says that he is reconsidering his stance that Huntsman wasn’t a better candidate than Romney.

    IOW, forget all about his humping Romney’s leg like a horndog in the general because he was right before he was wrong! Erick is working through the five stages of grief backwards.

    Acceptance: Erick pretty much immediately accepted that Obama won, even tweeting to Obama ‘Thanks for getting it over with quick’. Done Deal.

    Depression: He posted a depressing tome about the loss at Redstate after the election that tried to reassure everyone that while it was bad, it wasn’t the end of the world. That they all had their families and they would get through this.

    Bargaining: He opines about a variety of things that could have gone different with most thoughts leaning towards the right not having to had to anything different, such as having their rape candidates shut their mouths and keeping those ‘facts’ to themselves, and having had a better ground game. Not much thought is given to doing something about their problem with minorities other than improving their message without changing anything else that could positively affect minority opinions.

    Anger: Erick lashes out at those who say that the social conservative need to be thrown out of the party. Erick lashes out at the crappy consultants who didn’t know their asses from a hole in the ground.

    Denial: Today Erick is rewriting his personal history on Romney in the primary and general by telling everyone ‘I told you so!’.

    One RS member had the audacity to opine to Erick that he wasn’t any better than Romney:

    This post saves you and your RedState brand, but what does it say about you that you went against your own values, common sense, and what seems to be, adroit political savvy, and supported and voted for Romney, and rather forcefully, convinced others on this site to vote for him, even though you knew early on that he had no conservative principles or backbone? You accuse Romney of having 2 sides on every issue, but, it seems as if you did also. You would have had a stronger leg to stand on had you stuck with what your gut told you, but no, you went on to convince most of your readership, in the end, that Romney was a viable standard bearer to carry on the conservative cause in the general. As much as you, Erik Erikson, try to distance yourself from Romney’s dismal loss, you too are implicated. Saying “I told ya so,” after you, yourself, went against your own judgement makes me question how much of an independent thinking, conservative voice you are, and why, in this cycle at least, you ended up being simply a water carrier for the (as you predicted) fools gold candidacy of Willard “Mitt” Romney. I would hope other readers on this site would take heed of this, and be more critical of the voices who proclaim to be your mouthpieces. It just sounds like you, along with most on the Right, in the end, ignored the right thing to do, not supporting a Republican nominee that, 20 years ago, was battling to be as liberal as Teddy Kennedy, and tried to go for the easy and expedient win over Barack Obama.

    Erick has not responded but his members have. The argument “We fight in the primary and back the winner in the general, no matter what” is winning the day. Erick just can’t accept the fact that he is part of the problem with the party. Working through the five stages of grief backwards is probably part of his problem.

    If the five stages of grief enable you to get through and deal with a difficult time in your life, doing it backwards must help you to avoid it.

  195. 195
    priscianusjr says:

    The comparison with Willkie is very superficial. Running against Roosevelt in 1940, Willkie didn’t have a chance, and he was much ridiculed, I suppose, for even thinking he was worthy to replace FDR. As in this poem I learned from my mother:
    “A horse’s tail is soft and silky,
    Lift it up and you’ll see Willkie.”

    But my mother also told me that Willkie, a liberal Republican, was actually a fairly good guy. Proof of this was that after he lost, he was appointed by Roosevelt a sort of roving ambassador, or personal representative.

    Nothing like Romney, really.

  196. 196
    opie_jeanne says:

    @PeakVT: Even my family, Republicans to the core, disliked and distrusted Wilkie. I don’t know who they voted for that year.

  197. 197
    Odie Hugh Manatee says:

    A funny response in the Redstate diary I reference above:

    I was listening to a radio call in show the other day. A group of republicans were discussing who the future Republican candidates for president should be. One guy spoke up and said whoever it is, that person should be 180 degrees the opposite of Romney. Gov. Romney called in and said he could be that guy.

    It didn’t go over too well. Republicans just don’t have a sense of humor.

    Holy fuck, Erick responds to the criticism such as I quoted above:

    It is time for you to stop visiting RedState then. That I and many others never could gel with Romney and his campaign should have been a warning flag the whole time.

    Shorter Erick: “You should have known that we were lying to you!”

    The brass on this guy… ;p

  198. 198
    Terry Ott says:

    @RoonieRoo:
    Marco Rubio, I suppose.

  199. 199
    Ruckus says:

    @aimai:
    Do you have a really mean streak or just going with the law of averages? Either way works, just different motivations.

  200. 200
    Ruckus says:

    @kay:
    He didn’t pass on showing the “real” zomney, he doubled down by showing his shitty character.

  201. 201
    Matt McIrvin says:

    @catclub: “Paris is worth a Mass”, supposedly said by Henri IV of France, formerly a Huguenot, upon conversion to Catholicism so he could ascend the throne.

  202. 202
    Matt McIrvin says:

    @Carla H: I think Bill Gates had been planning to do this for a long time. For years and years, he was conspicuous for his relative lack of philanthropy and kept making oblique statements implying that he was planning something really big. I recall Ted Turner suggesting that he was full of it.

  203. 203
    Mike G says:

    @Odie Hugh Manatee:

    Shorter Erick: “You should have known that we were lying to you!”

    It’s the Flounder from Animal House defense:
    “You fucked up – you trusted us!”

  204. 204
    AA+ Bonds says:

    @Odie Hugh Manatee:

    Shorter Erick: “You should have known that we were lying to you!”

    It is true that the Republicans really fucking hated Romney

    That was always the escape hatch for the opinion-makers on the right

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