Linger on your pale blue eyes

“Conservative intellectuals” are very sad that Paul Ryan isn’t running for president:

The 41-year-old House Budget Committee chairman wasn’t just the right’s beau ideal because he authored the “Roadmap,” the controversial entitlement and spending reform plan — it’s also because his political roots are in the think tank world. Ryan worked for Jack Kemp and William Bennett at Empower America as a 20-something and even now he’s closer to conservative thinkers than he is to the typical GOP lobbyists and strategists that surround ambitious pols.

“They made Paul Ryan into a heartthrob,” said National Review senior editor Ramesh Ponnuru of his fellow right-leaning thinkers.

And he seemed a man for a wonky moment.

“It’s in some ways [the current field is] less satisfying because this is a particularly policy-heavy moment and the most wonky of the wonky issues are front and center,” said Yuval Levin, the Hertog Fellow at the conservative Ethics and Public Policy Center. “We feel the absence of policy intellectuals more.”

I feel very relieved that there aren’t any “conservative intellectuals” running for president. “Conservative intellectuals” dreamed up supply-side economics and neoconservatism and vouchercare. They held a dim-witted frat boy on a tight leash from 2001-2005, but praise-be-to-Bieber, they weren’t able to talk him into invading Iran during his second term. As bad as things were under Bush, they would have been that much worse under a president Bolton or Wolfowitz.

Michele Bachmann didn’t scare me that much until she started talking about von Mises.

102 replies
  1. 1
    Dennis SGMM says:

    “Conservative intellectuals” is an oxymoron.

  2. 2
    c u n d gulag says:

    The greatest oxymoron of them all:

    “Conservative Intellectual.”

    How intellectual do you have to be when all you ever say is, “Whoa, hold on there! Slow down! Take a moment. Let’s step back…” when what you really you mean is ‘Don’t let the n*ggers and sp*cs get hold of your money and power!”?

    Conservative intellectual – feh!

  3. 3
    Paris says:

    In summary, Paul Ryan has never had a real job.

  4. 4
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    I’m sad that Paul Ryan isn’t running for President.

    If he did, his political career would be over, and it would be another nail in the coffin of the vile neo-feudalist party.

  5. 5
    Calming Influence says:

    I submit that scratching “Keep turning right.” on a piece of paper qualifies as authoring a road map.

  6. 6
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    ZOMG, my google ad is for Rick Santorum, who is begging for money.

    What a vile creature HE is.

  7. 7
    Culture of Truth says:

    “They made Paul Ryan into a heartthrob,” said National Review senior editor Ramesh Ponnuru of his fellow right-leaning thinkers.

    They’re determined to put satirists out of business

  8. 8
    Hill Dweller says:

    Ryan is a complete fraud, but because the media has to prop up Republicans to preserve their “objectivity”, and mouth breathers are easily seduced by stringing a couple of sentences together, the rest of the country has to suffer through his nonsense.

  9. 9
    cleek says:

    @Villago Delenda Est:
    any wingnut bucks that end up in Santorum’s hole are wingnut bucks that don’t help the GOP nominee. so… go Santorum!

  10. 10
    MattF says:

    @Culture of Truth:

    It’s all about starbursts. And war, also.

  11. 11
    Xboxershorts says:

    Hey leave Ludwig alone!!!

    Even Ludwig couldn’t stand the corporatist Koch brothers and helped kick them out of the libertarian party!

  12. 12
    Raenelle says:

    It’s the closed mind–whether religious fanatic, just mentally challenged, or an ideologue–that’s scary. They have their world, and anyone who challenges it is an enemy to be converted if possible, crushed if not.

  13. 13
    DanF says:

    Michele Bachmann didn’t scare me that much until she started talking about von Mises.

    Tell me this is tongue-in-cheek. She scares me in the way that only a true believer can scare me and always has. She wouldn’t think twice about taking us all down if she believed the voice in her head was god’s will.

  14. 14
    Judas Escargot says:

    @Paris:

    In summary, Paul Ryan has never had a real job.

    This. Nor has Bachmann, nor Grover Norquist, nor Karl Rove. And most of the GOP heavies with backgrounds as businessmen inherited that status.

    “Productive class”, my arse.

  15. 15
    bob h says:

    The best description of the role the Republican Party now plays in our national life, that of an autoimmune disease, was provided by Kurt Anderson in the NYT last week.

    As the nation went into the 2000 elections, it was at the pinnacle of power, wealth, respect, and influence. And where did eight years of Republicanism leave it? And now, like an autoimmune disease, it wants another crack.

  16. 16
    jibeaux says:

    My guess is that even Paul Ryan can figure out that his campaign would involve going on the defensive for months at a time about a plan whose popularity runs in inverse proportion to how much people know about the plan.

  17. 17
    Bulworth says:

    Maybe T-Paw should reinvent himself again and get back in the race

  18. 18
    Zifnab says:

    I feel very relieved that there aren’t any “conservative intellectuals” running for president. “Conservative intellectuals” dreamed up supply-side economics and neoconservatism and vouchercare. They held a dim-witted frat boy on a tight leash from 2001-2005, but praise-be-to-Bieber, they weren’t able to talk him into invading Iran during his second term. As bad as things were under Bush, they would have been that much worse under a president Bolton or Wolfowitz.

    He listened to Bolton and Wolfowitz until his poll numbers started tanking. A Bolton or a Wolfowitz wouldn’t have the charisma or the cunning to make it in elected office. But they’ll always find a seat at the table as consultants and advisers.

    If you think Doug Feith couldn’t get a job in a Perry or a Romney or a Bachmann White House, I’d love to know why.

  19. 19
    Argive says:

    We don’t have conservative intellectuals anymore because an intellectual is capable of thinking independently, which is just Not Done in today’s conservative movement.

  20. 20
    Argive says:

    If you think Doug Feith couldn’t get a job in a Perry or a Romney or a Bachmann White House, I’d love to know why.

    Yeah, I’m pretty sure Rick Perry could find a cabinet post for the dumbest fucking guy on the planet.

  21. 21
    Gex says:

    I imagine Sully considers himself a “conservative intellectual” and just look at the erratic nonsense that comes from that.

    No, propping up the entrenched powers requires no intellectual capability. Just obedient omega dog traits.

  22. 22
    cleek says:

    anyone who considers himself/herself to be an “intellectual” is probably a bit of a dink.

  23. 23
    Seanly says:

    Does she love von Mises to pieces?

  24. 24
    Culture of Truth says:

    George Pataki is giving Presidential run “serious consideration.”

  25. 25
    rikyrah says:

    the clown car is full enough, but let Vouchercare Ryan run

  26. 26
    Derf says:

    This link goes out to all you Huntsman sympathizers. I hope you are proud of yourselves.
    http://theobamadiary.com/2011/08/23/desperation/

  27. 27
    Bulworth says:

    I wonder when Mitt Romney plans on entering the race…

  28. 28
    jibeaux says:

    @Bulworth:
    Man, I had a beer bet with somebody here about T-Paw (I took “not T-Paw”.) I wish I had a memory.

  29. 29
    Davis X. Machina says:

    They have a philosophy of government, to be sure, but it’s not one you need intellectuals for — you need a medieval monarch.

    There really isn’t ‘a state’ to govern.

    1. There’s a treasury, and the fiscal apparatus used to fill it, that can be used to extract wealth from your subjects to enrich your family, and friends.

    2. There’s a small, professional army, intended for war , i.e. extracting wealth from foreigners — and for use on your domestic opponents if they get shirty about #1. From time to time it will succumb to religious delusions and go on Crusade.

    3. There are jobs, places and favors to be distributed from the throne. They are to be deployed to keep your retainers happy — a bunch of disaffected barons isn’t good for business. A number of these will be in the state cult.

    And if you do a good job, your children get to run the machine after you.

    The clock stopped for these people at about 1150 A.D.

  30. 30
    BGinCHI says:

    Politico is closeted political gay pr0n.

    Do they write like that with no self-consciousness? It sounds like Tiger Beat.

    Thank Jeebus there are no serious issues involved.

  31. 31
    Head Bulshytt Talker in Chief of the Temple of Libertarianism(superluminar) says:

    Ok I’m struggling with the song reference here. Somebody help me out (I normally get these, it’s frustrating)!

  32. 32
    Hunter Gathers says:

    Ryan isn’t an intellectual. He’s nothing more than an Ayn Rand fanboi with a calculator and access to teh Google. Putting him in charge of any kind public policy would be like an aerospace company making me head of development because I understand how warp drive on Star Trek works and have read the entire Chronicles of Dune.

  33. 33
    Belafon (formerly anonevent) says:

    @Derf: I think you’re on the wrong website again.

  34. 34
    cmorenc says:

    @Zinfab:

    He (Bush) listened to Bolton and Wolfowitz until his poll numbers started tanking.

    My strong hunch is that Bush privately regrets allowing himself to be surrounded with and captivated by many of the people who served in key roles in the first four years of his administration, particularly Dick Cheney. Though Bush isn’t an introspective type of person, he likely sees his Presidency as a huge missed opportunity, both on the domestic and foreign fronts, and that he could have done far better insistently following his own inclinations, had he chosen those around him better. Unfortunately, these inclinations did include an obsession with invading Iraq to topple Hussein, and policies favoring big corporate and fossil-fuel energy company interests, and he was willing to pander to the religious right even though his personal instincts were more tolerant (not that they were progressive by any stretch). Nevertheless, it’s interesting how in the latter days of his administration, Bush increasingly resisted Cheney’s influence to the point of near-estrangement, but the damage was already done.

  35. 35
  36. 36
    Geeno says:

    @cleek: Are those the bucks buying all that steak with government money?

  37. 37
  38. 38
    PaulW says:

    Paul Ryan and I are the same age.

    I’d suggest y’all vote for ME instead, but I don’t want to split the votes with Obama and force the whole nation to suffer a Michelle Bachmann presidency. So for now, I’m waiting for 2016…

  39. 39

    Speaking of “conservative intellectuals”, Frum allowed this to be published on his site.

    George W. Bush’s place in the pantheon of celebrated American presidents is far from secure. Nevertheless, the collapse of Muammar Qaddafi’s regime in Libya sheds new light on President Bush’s vigorous support for democratic values across the entire Middle East.
    An Obama administration starved of good news will likely seek and receive credit for helping topple the dictatorship, but his predecessor deserves substantial credit for envisioning and perhaps even helping instigate the Arab Spring – of which the events in Libya constitute only the latest chapter – as a whole.

    http://www.frumforum.com/the-f.....vindicated

  40. 40
    Belafon (formerly anonevent) says:

    @gocart mozart: While he’s at it, maybe Frum could give some credit to the Crusaides for changing Muslim hearts and minds.

  41. 41

    @Bulworth:
    His 2012 campaign peaked in late 2007.

  42. 42
    Culture of Truth says:

    The story of GOP

    “Deserve Substantial Credit For Perhaps Even Helping”

  43. 43
    Culture of Truth says:

    I envision the Jets winning the Superbowl, and close my eyes at crucial junctures.

    Ring please!!!

  44. 44
    Argive says:

    @gocart mozart:

    It sure would be super great if the dumbfucks spouting this kind of idiocy could point to some actual evidence to support their thesis.

  45. 45

    @Belafon (formerly anonevent):
    It was some twerp named Clifton Yin. Perhaps Frum’s pool boy?

  46. 46
    flukebucket says:

    @Head Bulshytt Talker in Chief of the Temple of Libertarianism(superluminar):

    Ok I’m struggling with the song reference here.

    The Clash or Softcell?

  47. 47

    Think much earlier punk band then the Clash.

  48. 48
    Belafon (formerly anonevent) says:

    @gocart mozart: Sorry, I missed that part; I didn’t click on the link. it’s too late for me to take Frum’s name out, but the point still stands: Bush deserves credit for the Arab Spring in the same way that McVeigh deserves credit for revitalizing downtown Oklahoma City.

  49. 49
    Derf says:

    @Belafon (formerly anonevent): Let’s see, Dem concern trolling, Libertarian sympathizing, Cole wrong about everything while fapping over everything Greenwald says. Nope, this is the correct place.

  50. 50

    @Argive:
    I blame Clinton’s Penis.

  51. 51
    catclub says:

    @Bulworth: I suggested that about Haley Barbour. He is probably much smarter than T-paw.
    And much better wired to the powers that be in DC.

  52. 52
    cleek says:

    @Belafon (formerly anonevent):

    the same way that McVeigh deserves credit for revitalizing downtown Oklahoma City.

    standing ovation.

    but, yeah: who the hell would look at Iraq or Afghanistan and say “unending sectarian strife? we gotta get us some of that!

  53. 53
  54. 54
    Raven (formerly stuckinred) says:

    @Argive: Did someone call “Reality Check”?

  55. 55
    catclub says:

    @cmorenc: I agree with most of this. I will praise Bush as much as I can stand for not letting Dick Cheney Invade Iran. say what you like, from 2005 to 2008 he was the sane one in the white house.

    But it is still hard for me to imagine this: “he likely sees his Presidency as a huge missed opportunity”.

    Implies facts not in evidence.

  56. 56

    Here;s a headline you don’t see often enough:

    Tea Party Congressman Collects Disability From Union Job

    Of course he does. I’m so over these morally bankrupt assholes and their “movement.” Let’s just concede the notion that they have any principles whatsoever and acknowledge that they’re all about fighting the liberal black man in the White House.

  57. 57
    Zifnab says:

    @cmorenc:

    My strong hunch is that Bush privately regrets allowing himself to be surrounded with and captivated by many of the people who served in key roles in the first four years of his administration, particularly Dick Cheney.

    He’s been interviewed numerous times on the issue. Bush doesn’t regret shit. If he had it to do all over again, he might try to spin things differently, but I doubt he’d try to do things differently.

  58. 58
    catclub says:

    @Belafon (formerly anonevent): lol “changing Muslim hearts and minds”

    From opposed to Crusades to implacably opposed?

  59. 59
    gex says:

    @gocart mozart: Graham Parsons maybe? I’ve only ever heard Emmylou Harris sing that line. It was in a tribute concert for him.

  60. 60
    redshirt says:

    @gocart mozart: I love this technique! Anything good that happens during a Democratic Administration is due to previous Republican Presidents and policies; anything bad that happens of course is the Demoncrat’s fault.

    During a Republican Presidential Admin, anything bad that happens (911!) was the previous Democrat’s fault, and anything good that happens is because of the current Admin.

    Rinse and repeat.

  61. 61
    Chyron HR says:

    Clearly they’re using “wonk” in the sense of “I didn’t hear from her afterwards, but a few weeks later, I had a weird rash on my wonk.”

  62. 62
    jibeaux says:

    I am envisioning flying cars and $10 iPads. I am now accepting substantial credit. Thankyouverymuch.

  63. 63
    Raven (formerly stuckinred) says:

    Linger on Velvet Underground

  64. 64
    Raven (formerly stuckinred) says:

    @redshirt: And that differs from “our” side how? It’s all bullshit.

  65. 65
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @cmorenc:

    That entire analysis assumes that George W. Bush has any capacity for introspection.

    This is a pretty bad assumption given what we can observe about his behavior both during and after his presidency.

  66. 66
  67. 67
    Suffern ACE says:

    @Zifnab:

    If you think Doug Feith couldn’t get a job in a Perry or a Romney or a Bachmann White House, I’d love to know why.

    They never go away. They never go away. It doesn’t matter who is in charge. They are either in the administration or on your TV, fucking up the world wherever they go. They are poison. If I were China, I would pour money into whatever “foundation” they currently work for and hope that they get positions in the next republican administration. You can’t pay for double-agents who could do as much damage.

    But they have been part of every Republican administration since Nixon and and they just don’t seem to want to die.

  68. 68
    Roger Moore says:

    @Argive:

    Yeah, I’m pretty sure Rick Perry could find a cabinet post for the dumbest fucking guy on the planet.

    Let me guess: President.

  69. 69
    jwest says:

    Every time I see an article with the same theme as this, I try to imagine what it must be like to have such little actual confidence in your intellectual ability that you need to attempt convincing others with the same affliction that (despite all evidence to the contrary) you’re smart.

    “I can handle things! I’m smart! Not like everybody says… like dumb… I’m smart and I want respect!”

    Keep it up, Fredo. And remember, “It’s got electrolytes!”.

  70. 70
    dmsilev says:

    @gocart mozart: (quoting Frum)

    George W. Bush’s place in the pantheon of celebrated American presidents is far from secure.

    Aaaannnnnddd we have a winner in the coveted “Understatement of the Century” award.

  71. 71

    @redshirt:

    Of course. It’s Republican Rules!

    1) It’s always good news for Republicans
    2) It’s always the Democrats’ fault
    3) IOKIYAR

    rinse … repeat … etc.

  72. 72
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    George W. Bush’s place in the pantheon of celebrated American presidents is far from secure

    Understatement of the the last three centuries. His place is pretty much as secure as James Buchanan’s.

    William Henry Harrison rates ahead of him, if only because he had much less time to inflict damage.

  73. 73

    @jwest:

    And remember, “It’s got electrolytes!”.

    HA HA HA HA HA!!!!

    Loved that movie.

  74. 74

    @c u n d gulag:

    How intellectual do you have to be when all you ever say is, “Whoa, hold on there! Slow down! Take a moment. Let’s step back…”

    Don’t forget, the new conservative talking points are:

    The bill is too long!
    We need MORE time to read the bill!
    Everything is too complicated!
    There are too many czars!

    I mean, crazy shit …

  75. 75
    Martin says:

    Maybe Kucinich should primary Obama now that he’s calling for NATO commanders to be sent to The Hague.

  76. 76
    jacy says:

    @Villago Delenda Est:

    My hope is that Bush regrets quitting drinking long enough to destroy the country, but I doubt he’s that self-aware.

    The only thing worse than a dim, intellectually incurious, narcissistic dry drunk is a dim, intellectually incurious, narcissistic dry drunk with a psychopathic meglomaniac pulling his puppet-strings.

    Or at least that’s the current benchmark – there’s the still the possibility of Perry/Bachmann ticket and then all bets are off.

  77. 77
    Professor says:

    @Southern Beale: So why don’t you send this congressman’s hypocrisy to other sympathetic blogs and spread it. He is a real piece of shit!

  78. 78
    Ian says:

    @gocart mozart:
    That makes me want to stick a fork in my eye.
    IIRC, Bush welcomed Qaddifi back into the international community. Talked about it being a big accomplishment.

    LIES! WHY DO THEY LIE!

  79. 79
    Monkey Business says:

    There are conservative intellectuals.

    There are no Republican conservative intellectuals.

  80. 80
    Villago Delenda Est says:

    @Ian:

    LIES! WHY DO THEY LIE!

    They know no other way. The tale of the scorpion crossing the river comes to mind.

  81. 81
    Roger Moore says:

    @Ian:

    LIES! WHY DO THEY LIE!

    Assuming this isn’t a rhetorical question, they lie because the truth hurts them reality has a well-known liberal bias.

  82. 82
    superluminar says:

    Ok, thanks y’all, been too long since I listened to those guys I’ll have to correct that. Alsotoo, clash/softcell ref. FTW!

  83. 83

    Conservative intellectuals are called Democrats.

  84. 84
    Davis X. Machina says:

    @gocart mozart:

    Conservative intellectuals are called Democrats.

    I am the ghost of Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and I approve this message.

  85. 85
    c u n d gulag says:

    @Southern Beale:
    Jeez, thanks for reminding me. How could I forget?

  86. 86
    Dennis SGMM says:

    @Southern Beale:

    Tea Party Congressman Collects Disability From Union Job

    The teahadists don’t object at all to government payouts, handouts, and bailouts as long as the money goes to the right kind of people. You know; the ones who don’t need it.

  87. 87
    JGabriel says:

    Politico:

    “I would hope that whoever the Republican candidate is, he or she will not tell us that creationism or intelligent design is the equivalent of evolution — just another theory about the origins of the biological man,” said the syndicated Washington Post columnist Charles Krauthammer … “To put intelligent design on that level is like offering grade-school children a choice between astronomy and astrology,” he said.

    Maybe you could write a column on that, Charlie.

    This is the party you helped create.

    .

  88. 88
    Xboxershorts says:

    @Culture of Truth:

    I envision the Jets winning the Superbowl

    Only if Officer Crumpkey stays out of their way.

    Why, yes, I am that old, please get off my lawn.

  89. 89
    TenguPhule says:

    The best description of the role the Republican Party now plays in our national life, that of an autoimmune disease, was provided by Kurt Anderson in the NYT last week.

    Odd, I always had them pegged as the bubonic plague.

  90. 90
    TenguPhule says:

    My strong hunch is that Bush privately regrets allowing himself to be surrounded with and captivated by many of the people who served in key roles in the first four years of his administration, particularly Dick Cheney

    Assumes facts not in evidence.

    Born a dumbfuck, and will die a dumbfuck. Ideally sooner then later. I’d like to piss on his grave without needing a walker.

  91. 91
    Xboxershorts says:

    Well, DC Just had an Earthquake:

    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/ear.....lqe6x3.php

    We felt it up here in Coudersport, PA too!

  92. 92
    Maude says:

    @Xboxershorts:
    I am in NJ and I thought the building where I live moved a bit. I don’t drink, take drugs or anything else and I thought I was a bit on the nutty side. There was no noise of walls cracking. It was indeed odd. It was twice and a slow move side to side. Western NJ

  93. 93
    Chris says:

    @Raenelle:

    It’s the closed mind—whether religious fanatic, just mentally challenged, or an ideologue—that’s scary. They have their world, and anyone who challenges it is an enemy to be converted if possible, crushed if not.

    and @DanF:

    Tell me this is tongue-in-cheek. She scares me in the way that only a true believer can scare me and always has. She wouldn’t think twice about taking us all down if she believed the voice in her head was god’s will.

    this. Huckabee was the first person I saw in an election (still fairly young here) who had that effect on me. Jacy once mentioned that under the right circumstances, he was the kind of person she could easily see loading people onto cattle cars – I concur. And Bachmann has the same effect.

  94. 94
    Chris says:

    @cmorenc:

    My strong hunch is that Bush privately regrets allowing himself to be surrounded with and captivated by many of the people who served in key roles in the first four years of his administration, particularly Dick Cheney. Though Bush isn’t an introspective type of person, he likely sees his Presidency as a huge missed opportunity, both on the domestic and foreign fronts, and that he could have done far better insistently following his own inclinations, had he chosen those around him better.

    Interesting.

    Someone I know once met Bush (when he was President) for a few minutes and came away saying that he probably could’ve amounted to a lot more if he’d surrounded himself with better people.

    Bush strikes me as the kid who falls in with the wrong gang, senses it at a certain level, but sticks with them for the rest of his life out of laziness, inertia and the knowledge that as long as he sticks to the official line, they’ll mostly shield him from the consequences of his actions.

  95. 95
    Chris says:

    @gocart mozart:

    An Obama administration starved of good news will likely seek and receive credit for helping topple the dictatorship, but his predecessor deserves substantial credit for envisioning and perhaps even helping instigate the Arab Spring – of which the events in Libya constitute only the latest chapter – as a whole.

    Like I said back when the Arab Spring was starting – the GOP has no fixed party line on it and won’t for some time. They’re waiting to see if Egypt, Tunisia and those other countries turn into nice respectable democracies with liberty and tax cuts for all or evil terrorist Ragheadistans… then they’ll know whether to squeal “Bush did it!” or “Obama did it!”

    In the meantime, expect a lot of contradictory “ZOMG Obama helps scary Mooslins!” and “YEAH Bush was RIGHT baby!” messages from their “intellectuals.”

  96. 96
    Matt says:

    There aren’t any “conservative intellectuals” running for the same reason there aren’t any unicorns that shit rainbows running – NEITHER ONE FUCKING EXISTS.

    And actually, the unicorn is more likely, given that the “shitting rainbows” part isn’t utterly ruled out by the “unicorn” part in the way that “conservative” is fundamentally opposed to “intellectual”.

  97. 97
    Robert Waldmann says:

    I don’t understand Ryan’s reasoning. Now Who beat me to that point ?

    No one knows what it’s like
    To be the bad man
    To be the sad man
    Behind blue eyes

    No one knows what it’s like
    To be hated
    To be fated
    To telling only lies

  98. 98
    DanielX says:

    One may only hope Newt the Gingrich hears of this “no conservative intellectuals” meme, turns even more puce colored than normal, spins around three times and falls to the ground, frothing at the mouth. I mean, he IS an intellectual, just ask him – which is just one of the reasons the Teabaggers (still can’t use that term without snorting) can’t stand him. Note that I didn’t say his ideas make sense, just that he has some.

  99. 99
    Jeffro says:

    I think the R logo with “We Feel the Absence of Policy Intellectuals” written beneath it would sell a gazillion t-shirts.

    Also, REM’s version of Pale Blue Eyes is still the best. Apologies if this was already argued and settled upthread.

  100. 100
    Big Baby DougJ says:

    @Jeffro:

    I like the REM version but you can’t beat Lou’s original.

  101. 101
    Donut says:

    Thanks to the post title I’m trying to imagine Bill Kristol saying to Ryan, “I thought of you as my mountaintop, I thought of you as my peak, I thought of you as everything, I’ve had but couldn’t keep.”

    Funny shit, DougJ.

  102. 102
    Jebediah says:

    @Donut:
    And thanks to you, I can’t get that image out of my head – Bill Kristol sweetly singing to Paul Ryan as they gaze into each other’s eyes. Gah!

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