I suspect Rupert Murdoch may be having a bad day…

From the Guardian website:

David Cameron has bowed to pressure to hold public inquiries into the “absolutely disgusting” allegations of phone hacking by journalists at News of the World, and into the original police investigation into the scandal.

The phone-hacking crisis enveloping the News of the World has intensified after it emerged that Scotland Yard has started to contact the relatives of victims of the 7 July 2005 attacks to warn them they were targeted by the paper.

Ofcom has put out a statement on its website about its ability to intervene in the BSkyB takeover. Here it is.

In the light of the current public debate about phone hacking and other allegations, Ofcom confirms that it has a duty to be satisfied on an ongoing basis that the holder of a broadcasting licence is ‘fit and proper‘.

It is clearly not for Ofcom to investigate matters which properly lie in the hands of the police and the courts, however we are closely monitoring the situation and in particular the investigations by the relevant authorities into the alleged unlawful activities.

From a speech in parliament by Labour MP Tom Watson:

I want to inform the House of further evidence that suggests Rebekah Brooks [chief executive of News International] knew about the unlawful tactics of News of the World as early as 2002, despite all her denials yesterday. Rebekah Brooks was present at a meeting with Scotland Yard when police officers pursing a murder investigation provided her with evidence that her newspaper was interfering with the pursuit of justice. They gave her the name of another executive at News International, Alex Marunchak. The meeting, which included Dick Fedorcio of the Metropolitan police, told her that News of the World staff were guilty of interference and party to using unlawful means to attempt to discredit a police officer and his wife. She was told of actions by people she paid to expose and discredit David Cook and his wife Jackie Haines so that Mr Cook would be prevented from completing an investigation into a murder. News International were paying people to interfer with police officers and were doing so on behalf of known criminals. We know now that News International had entered the criminal underworld.

She cannot deny being present at this meeting when the actions of people she was paying were exposed. She cannot deny now being warned that under her auspices unlawful tactics were being used with the purpose of interfering with the pursuit of justice. She cannot deny that one of her staff, Alex Marunchak, was named and involved. She cannot deny either that she was told by the police that her own paper was using unlawful tactics, in this case to help one of her law-breaking investigators. This in my views shows her culpability goes beyond taking the blame as head of the organisation. It is about direct knowledge of unlawful behaviour.

And was Mr Marunchak dismissed. No. He was promoted.

Shares in News Corporation and BSkyB fell as the News of the World phone hacking scandal put Rupert Murdoch, and his bid to take control of the satellite broadcaster, under fresh scrutiny.

News Corp shares fell on Wednesday by 3.3%% in early trading on Wall Street to $17.56, (£11) as US investors reacted to the latest developments. BSkyB shares fell as low as 818p in London, a fall of more than 3% or 27p.

Cry me a river…






54 replies
  1. 1
    JGabriel says:

    Guardian:

    The phone-hacking crisis enveloping the News of the World has intensified after it emerged that Scotland Yard has started to contact the relatives of victims of the 7 July 2005 attacks to warn them they were targeted by the paper.

    Terrorized twice. First, by right wing religious fundamentalists, then by right wing capitalist fundamentalists.

    .

  2. 2
    Martin says:

    Eh. Murdoch will emerge unscathed. He’ll sack a bunch of people, replace them with equally horrible people, and the stock will recover. It’s a corporation – so he’s shielded.

  3. 3
    Corner Stone says:

    using unlawful means to attempt to discredit a police officer and his wife

    Damn. That’s some cold shit.
    They knew about this in 2002?? And she’s just been blissfully fucking people over for 10 years? While Murdoch has exponentially captured news and broadcasting outlets?

  4. 4
    Jewish Steel says:

    Glad you brought this up, Sarah. I was struck how the blame has come to rest on the shoulders of those in charge and not roll downhill to those “journalists” (term used advisedly) who, while they may be directly involved, are not equipped to defend themselves against the public onslaught. It’s the folks in charge who are ultimately responsible for the kind of culture that encourages this abuse.

    Good on you for shining a bright light in their craven faces, UK.

  5. 5
    a hip hop artist from Idaho (fka Bella Q) says:

    I’ll get more excited about this when it’s widely covered here in the US. And I’d check the butler’s pantry for that lovely Portuguese man.

  6. 6
    Lab Partner says:

    How come is it you never hear conservatives wailing about “victim’s rights” when there’s a conservative at fault?

  7. 7
    Yurpean says:

    At the heart of the scandal is Rebekah Brooks. She was the editor of the NotW in 2002, and has climbed up the greasy pole to running News International, which owns all of Murdoch’s UK newspapers. She’s very popular with Murdoch, which explains why she hasn’t been sacked yet, but who knows how long his patience will last.

    In the meantime, NI are in full ‘throw Andy Coulson under the bus mode’, to protect Brooks. Andy Coulson was deputy editor at the time, and became full editor in 2003, before being forced to resign from that position in 2007 as the first prosecutions in the phone hacking scandal were reaching their conclusion. He subsequently became David Cameron’s spin doctor, a position he was forced to give up earlier this year as allegations swirled around him.

    There’s a great video on youtube from Channel 4 News last night of an NI executive trying to justify the fact that Rebekah Brooks is in charge of investigating the wrongdoings, some of which occurred when she was in charge of the newspaper. Physician, investigate thyself!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Hzh1jZPOkU

  8. 8
    joeyess says:

    Anyone who thinks this that NewsCorp isn’t pulling this kind of bullshit in this country, only on a larger, political scale, needs to have their fucking head examined.

  9. 9
    geg6 says:

    Their first step was simple, albeit illegal. Paperwork seen by the Guardian reveals that they paid a Hampshire private investigator, Steve Whittamore, to obtain home addresses and, where necessary, ex-directory phone numbers for any families called Dowler in the Walton area. The three addresses Whittamore found could be obtained lawfully on the electoral register. The two ex-directory numbers, however, were “blagged” illegally from British Telecom’s confidential records by one of Whittamore’s associates, John Gunning, who works from a base in Wiltshire. One of the ex-directory numbers was attributed by Whittamore to Milly’s family home. Then, with the help of its own full-time private investigator, Glenn Mulcaire, the News of the World started illegally intercepting mobile phone messages. Scotland Yard is now investigating evidence that the paper hacked directly into the voicemail of the missing girl’s own phone. As her friends and parents called and left messages imploring Milly to get in touch with them, the News of the World was listening and recording their every private word. But the journalists at the News of the World then encountered a problem. Milly’s voicemail box filled up and would accept no more messages. Apparently thirsty for more information from more voicemails, the paper intervened – and deleted the messages that had been left in the first few days after her disappearance. According to one source, this had a devastating effect: when her friends and family called again and discovered that her voicemail had been cleared, they concluded that this must have been done by Milly herself and, therefore, that she must still be alive. But she was not. The interference created false hope and extra agony for those who were misled by it. The Dowler family then granted an exclusive interview to the News of the World in which they talked about their hope, quite unaware that it had been falsely kindled by the newspaper’s own intervention. Sally Dowler told the paper: “If Milly walked through the door, I don’t think we’d be able to speak. We’d just weep tears of joy and give her a great big hug.” The deletion of the messages also caused difficulties for the police by confusing the picture when they had few leads to pursue. It also potentially destroyed valuable evidence. According to one senior source familiar with the Surrey police investigation: “It can happen with abduction murders that the perpetrator will leave messages, asking the missing person to get in touch, as part of their efforts at concealment. We need those messages as evidence. Anybody who destroys that evidence is seriously interfering with the course of a police investigation.”

    Sorry for the long quote, but this is just unbelievable. Not an ounce of human decency is evident anywhere. Fucking Murdoch is more evil than I had ever imagined. And that’s saying quite a lot.

  10. 10
    TreeBeard says:

    People out here are quite, quite pissed. If nothing is done about it, Labour will have a 20-tonne stick to beat the ConDem alliance on the head with, next time around the elections roll in.

    I despise Murdoch rags anyway, but the extent of these shenanigans – the Dowler one to start with – has been horrifying to me. Now it turns out they hacked* the voicemails of even 7/7 bombing victims, which goes into James Bond villain levels of evil.

    My far favourite excuse has been that “Rebekah Brooks was on holiday” when [some particular violation] occurred. Lets see a politician get away with that one. “I’m sorry the military dropped a nuke on New Zealand, I was skiing in the Alps”.

    The best thing to come out of this has been how quick some brands have pulled their ads from the NOTW. Ford was the fastest and made a clean break, not just “considering our options” shit. Now I wish they stop advertising in ANY Murdoch toilet tissue.

    *okay, “hacked” is too strong a word, but it’s also one that fits

  11. 11
    sukabi says:

    so if Scotland Yard KNEW about this in 2002, why wasn’t Murdoch’s ‘paper’ seized by the state or shut down? The folks in that enterprise were running a criminal organization and not just interfering in a police investigation, they were actively sabotaging it… it will be interesting to find out how many of these ‘practices’ are being employed at FOX.

  12. 12
    JGabriel says:

    Martin:

    Murdoch will emerge unscathed. He’ll sack a bunch of people, replace them with equally horrible people, and the stock will recover.

    Yeah, that’s my thinking too. I almost wish I had money to buy News Corps stock and flip it when it goes back up.

    Almost.

    .

  13. 13
    Han's Solo says:

    I’m not up on the specifics of this case, nor am I an expert on English law; can someone give me a rundown on potential outcomes? Can the Brits take away the broadcast license of “News International?”

    I read the links, it looks like News International (I assume this is part of News Corp) hired PIs to hack into cell phones of politicians, cops, athletes and others. I assume this leaves them open to lawsuits from those they hacked, but is that the limit of their liability? In America we could sue for such a thing, but the Supreme Court would rule for News Corp and there would be no down side for News Corp. But this didn’t happen in the US.

    So what is the likely/potential downside in the UK?

  14. 14
    gene108 says:

    Meh…Murdoch still has his cash cow: Fox News…

    U.S. Fox News fans aren’t going to (a) care about what’s happening in England and (b) won’t make the connection between News Corp.’s various news organizations throughout the world and Fox News.

  15. 15
    sb says:

    What geg6 said. If someone bet me that a news organization would hack into a victim’s phone and delete messages creating false hope, etc. you would have won some money from me. I’m not naive in that I know some dirty shit happens in all walks of life but the passage geg6 quoted above is just beyond me.

  16. 16
    TheMightyTrowel says:

    it will also be interesting to find out who at scotland yard was getting paid off so as not to investigate.

  17. 17
    WereBear says:

    I thought it was bad enough to delete the emails and give the family false hope. To show up and ask if they had any hope to goose the story; yeah.

    No words.

  18. 18
    JGabriel says:

    Corner Stone:

    They knew about this in 2002?? And she’s just been blissfully fucking people over for 10 years? While Murdoch has exponentially captured news and broadcasting outlets?

    You call it fucking people over, News International calls it achieving the corporate mission through creative use of extra-legal strategies.

    .

  19. 19
    TreeBeard says:

    The Mighty Trowel

    The Met’s reputation has taken a battering over the last decade. Badly. This won’t come as a surprise to anyone.

  20. 20

    In America we could sue for such a thing, but the Supreme Court would rule for News Corp and there would be no down side for News Corp. But this didn’t happen in the US.

    While cynicism is often justified, I think this goes too far. Victims could sue here as well and win. Offer void only if you can plausibly tie said privacy violations into protecting us from Islamic terrorism or other national security issues.

  21. 21
    ThatLeftTurnInABQ says:

    @gene108 #14:

    U.S. Fox News fans aren’t going to (a) care about what’s happening in England and (b) won’t make the connection between News Corp.’s various news organizations throughout the world and Fox News.

    You left out: (c ) if it comes right down to it they will demonize the victims and rationalize that “they had it coming”. The countertops, you know.

  22. 22
    scav says:

    @ThatLeftTurnInABQ: We’ve already seen the class-warfare defense (a.k.a. the “You’re only attacking Murdoch because you’re an elitist and he knows what real people want!”) being attempted in some threads (not B-J, could be Guardian or BBC or ??)

  23. 23
    JGabriel says:

    geg6:

    Milly’s voicemail box filled up and would accept no more messages. Apparently thirsty for more information from more voicemails, the paper intervened – and deleted the messages that had been left in the first few days after her disappearance. According to one source, this had a devastating effect: when her friends and family called again and discovered that her voicemail had been cleared, they concluded that this must have been done by Milly herself and, therefore, that she must still be alive. But she was not. The interference created false hope and extra agony for those who were misled by it. The Dowler family then granted an exclusive interview to the News of the World in which they talked about their hope, quite unaware that it had been falsely kindled by the newspaper’s own intervention. … The deletion of the messages also caused difficulties for the police by confusing the picture when they had few leads to pursue. It also potentially destroyed valuable evidence.

    Not an ounce of human decency is evident anywhere. Fucking Murdoch is more evil than I had ever imagined. And that’s saying quite a lot.

    This is pretty much exactly where I always imagined Murdoch and his media properties are on the scale of evil. It’s always a disappointment to see one’s worst expectations realized, though.

    Not to mention that, once they reach that point, you know they’ll go further, and you have to find a new lower bound at which to set your new expectations.

    I mean, does anyone think, with this story, that we’ve really discovered the worst that has ever been done by Murdoch’s media empire?

    .

  24. 24
    Han's Solo says:

    @gocart mozart: I disagree. Exxon got away (had the jury award lowered to a pittance) with the Exxon Valdez because SCOTUS pulled law out of their keisters; they would do the same with News Corp.

    Name one case involving a big corporation of late where SCOTUS came down on the side of the injured party and not the corporation. That the company in this case, News Corp, is a rightwing mainstay makes it even less likely that SCOTUS would let any legal challenge hurt the company.

  25. 25
    Corner Stone says:

    @JGabriel:

    I mean, does anyone think, with this story, that we’ve really discovered the worst that has ever been done by Murdoch’s media empire?

    We already knew they (Murdoch companies) donated to the GOP. What else did we need to know?

  26. 26
    Gregory says:

    Fish rots from the head down.

  27. 27
    Dave says:

    Ah, schadenfreude…you taste so sweet…

  28. 28
    gene108 says:

    A Bit of Fry and Laurie’s take on if Murdoch had never been born.

    Appropriate for this thread.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1aZcsY-O8Q

  29. 29
    JGabriel says:

    gene108:

    U.S. Fox News fans aren’t going to (a) care about what’s happening in England and (b) won’t make the connection between News Corp.’s various news organizations throughout the world and Fox News.

    Especially since (a)Fox News will never tell them about it, and (b) they don’t watch anything else.

    .

  30. 30
    gene108 says:

    ThatLeftTurnInABQ #21

    You left out: (c ) if it comes right down to it they will demonize the victims and rationalize that “they had it coming”. The countertops, you know.

    I’m not sure I know about the countertops – I just don’t get the reference here – but you are spot on about Fox News getting their viewers to blame the victions.

  31. 31
    rickstersherpa says:

    Schadenfreude. Particularly how this is screwing over Rupert’s acquisition of complete control over BSkyB. And this is getting pretty close to ol’ Rupert himself.

  32. 32
    cleek says:

    @gene108:

    I’m not sure I know about the countertops – I just don’t get the reference here

    Malkin stalks a child.

  33. 33
    ruemara says:

    May it be a sword of karmic justice. He, at least his organization, may have allowed a murderer to escape justice. At the least, they turned the knife in the stomache of her family. They harassed families in mourning after their loved ones were killed or hurt in bombings. These are evil people and if there is no deity that will simply open the ground beneath them and swallow them and their ilk whole, then may they completely suffer criminally, personally and professionally.

  34. 34
    different church-lady says:

    @ gene108 (#30)

    The Balloon Juice Lexicon, baby: how does it work?

    (Scroll down to “counter tops”)

  35. 35
    Corner Stone says:

    It’s a sad damn day when Big Media Matt gets something so clearly:

    the White House appears to have sincerely pivoted away from the idea that a higher level of aggregate demand would reduce unemployment and instead embraced the notion that there’s basically nothing that can be done in the short-term.

    Nothing can be done!

    One strategy would be to ensure that all else is not equal and that government spending fills the gap opened up by the collapse in private spending. But that hasn’t happened. Federal spending has continued roughly at trend levels, and state/local spending has also fallen below trend. The result is mass unemployment.

    Hoocoodanode?

  36. 36
    TreeBeard says:

    The Telegraph – the bleedin’ TORYGRAPH! – has gone to town on this issue too. I suppose they’re just happy to beat on their competitor for the Tory side of the news. Although I dare say that even though I don’t like their slant on editorials and choice of articles, their reporting is good…

    Anyway… The Times ignores phone hacking, then blames ‘journalism’ for News International’s shocking practices

    The main leader in the Times today is headed “The Practice of Journalism”. That’s a brazen choice of title, given that what follows is one of the most dishonest, misleading and badly written pieces of journalism I’ve read in a long time.

    In summary, The Times is accusing British journalism in general of the scummy practices that are the hallmark of its parent company, News International, which is accused of hacking into the voicemail of Milly Dowler and, possibly, those of the parents of Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman.

    But my favourite line is at the end:

    Such thunderous flatulence defies parody.

    Only in Britain!

  37. 37
    pete says:

    Simon Greenberg, the executive interviewed by Channel 4 (link @7, thanks to Yurpean), is a young man who will go far. Check him out. I have not seen such a magnificent display of nonspeak since the last time I watched John Bird and John Fortune (whom Google if ye know not).

  38. 38
    Yurpean says:

    @subaki The press and the police are malignantly intertwined over here, with the police leaking (& indeed selling) information when it’s helpful for them, and the press generally being supportive of the police in return[1]. Andy Hayman, the officer who lead the first investigation of phone hacking back in 2005-7 which looked at the hacking of only a handful of people in the Royal family, and ignored the evidence that thousands had actually been hacked, now writes the occasional column for The Times and other Murdoch papers. Fancy that.

    [1] Not that such things don’t happen in the US. Ever wondered how the cameras always seem to know where and when a high profile ‘perp walk’ occurs?

  39. 39
    Yurpean says:

    @Han’s Solo The whole thing blew up again in 2009 (the initial investigation into the hacking of Royal voicemail and subsequent trial were 2005-7) after it emerged that News International had been making settlements (with associated gag agreements) with hacking victims. One big issue was that only a few people were aware of the fact they had been hacked, as the police didn’t bother going through the documents they’d seized during the 2005 investigation to tell other potential victims. Over the last few years, more people have found out they’ve been targeted and have joined civil suits agains NI. Some are still going forward, others have accepted pay-offs as compensation. It’s going to cost them millions, but NI is a huge company, and News Corp is massive, so the overall fiscal effect will be small.

  40. 40
    Amir_Khalid says:

    This seems about as evil as journalism gets. NOTW has a long history of hair-raising practices like making shit up and losing lawsuits over the made-up shit; bribing cops to get stories; and condoning illegal practices by its hired investigators(of which the phone hacking is only the latest example). Their 2000 name-and-shame campaign against child molesters got some innocent people attacked by angry mobs. All of this has happened since Uncle Rupert took charge in ’69.

    If any newspaper deserves to get shut down it’s these evil fuckers, but I don’t see the authorities shutting them down because in Britain they can’t do that.

    And to see their sister paper The Times of London claiming other papers do it too … Well, The Times used to be a great paper.

  41. 41

    Lab Partner:
    Only The Tribe has rights. This is very important to understand. In practice, anyone else having rights interferes with The Tribe’s rights. In theory, the whole idea of other people having rights is… just crazy. Why would they?

  42. 42
    eemom says:

    There’s another pic out there somewhere of that Brooks woman with her sunglasses off. She is creepy looking. Perfect for a Bride of Murdoch.

  43. 43
    Catpause says:

    Murdock makes W R Hearst look like Francis of Assisi.
    Hey, TeaTards! Want your country back? Look in Rupert’s wallet.

  44. 44

    we can only hope that the scandal mestastisizes and includes his u.s. operations. that this policy and procedure was widely adopted by all management go-getters across the operation.

    of course, faux news has the perfect alibi, they either only report exactly what the gop wants said, or they make things up, and everyone knows it.

    it would be fun to see them go to court to argue that they aren’t sufficently expected to be accurate in their reporting, so they are incapable of actually damaging anyone with libel.

  45. 45
    PIGL says:

    I keep harping on the same point, so maybe I am just wrong, but here goes again. The activities of Murdoch in Australia, Great Britain and the United States are not primarily matters for criminal justice or foreign investment review, or anti-monopoly rules. They are matters for counter-intelligence agencies.

    This guy and his clan are out to subvert the realm(s), and the policies that have succeeded in advocating endanger national security, not to mention the future of the planet.
    If even one western nation had a functioning service, Murdoch and family would have been squashed 10 years ago.

  46. 46
    SRW1 says:

    Yurpean

    Nice piece of journalism there. Somehow I doubt that Simon Greenberg was very keen to comply with the mentioned request by the Beeb for a follow-up interview.

  47. 47
    Sly says:

    @gene108

    Meh…Murdoch still has his cash cow: Fox News…

    DirecTV and Sky Network, actually. Those two networks have turned Rupert Murdoch into the biggest purveyor of pay-per-view pornography on the planet.

    Fox News makes News Corp. around 500 million annually. Just the pay-per-view pornography revenue from DirecTV alone brings in at least that much.

  48. 48
    maus says:

    Eh, his reputation isn’t sunk among the faithful, and he’s still a multibillionaire. If only he could be reduced to tatters, along with his trophy wife and horrible children.

  49. 49
    Gozer says:

    10.20pm: Relatives of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan have been informed that they may have had their phones hacked by the News of the World, lawyers have confirmed.

    The Ministry of Defence is seeking clarification about the allegations from Scotland Yard. Detectives are contacting the families of dead servicemen over the scandal.

    News International said it would be “absolutely appalled and horrified” if there was any truth in the allegations.

    MPH Solicitors, whose clients include Samantha Roberts, widow of one of the first Britons killed in Iraq in 2003, said they were contacted earlier today about the possibility of dead servicemen’s families being targeted by the News of the World.

    “We have been contacted this morning in connection with a possible phone-hacking on our clients, and Geraldine McCool, arising out of high-profile military inquests in 2006/2007,” a statement said. We are making efforts to verify this information.”

    A News International spokesman said: “News International’s record as a friend of the armed services and of our servicemen and servicewomen, is impeccable.

    These are cartoonish levels of villainy and North Korean levels of ass covering.

    EDIT: FYWP ruined my formatting…

  50. 50
    the idler says:

    @PIGL

    Agreed- The Metropolitan Police Service has been penetrated by Murdoch’s minions. MI5 should lead this investigation.

  51. 51
    NadePaulKuciGravMcKi says:

    extortion blackmail bribery
    protect criminals at all cost

  52. 52
    bjacques says:

    PM “Call Me Dave” Cameron, best buddies with Ms. Brooks and Mr. Murdoch (as all Tories are and nuLabour wish they could be), has to save his ass and make sure the Murdoch’s takeover of BSkyB goes through on time. But he’s still playing yesterday’s game. An inquiry is for stalling an angry public until the heat is off, and might lead to half-hearted attempts at cosmetic reforms, as with the invasion of Iraq and the banking scandals. That might have worked when the voicemail hacking targets were celebrities (part of the game), even with the involvement of crooked cops.

    When the targets are war widows, victims of terrorist bombing and the parents of a murdered girl *led to believe she was still alive*, it crosses from venality to pure evil. Former editor Andy Coulson already copped to the celebrity tappings, and duly fell on his sword to protect his bosses and Cameron, but he’d have to be crazy to put his name to the new ones.

    The public (rightly) wants blood. Murdoch wants his takeover deal. Cameron wants to save his political ass.

    Towards the end of Hellraiser, a newly revived Frank has to flee the Cenobites who killed him and are after him again, but he’s too weak to move far. Julia, who’d been bringing him fresh victims, can’t deliver. Gas wha hoppen?

    “Nothing personal, babe!

    *CHOMP*!!”

  53. 53
    Howlin Wolfe says:

    U.S. Fox News fans aren’t going to (a) care about what’s happening in England and (b) won’t make the connection between News Corp.’s various news organizations throughout the world and Fox News.

    You left out: (c ) if it comes right down to it they will demonize the victims and rationalize that “they had it coming”. The countertops, you know.

    Has Fuck Snooze even reported this? I don’t have cable, and wouldn’t watch it if I did, but I’m sincerely curious if this has even been mentioned there. Has any other US MSM outlet covered it in any detail? or are they too afraid of Roger Ailes (the evil one)?

  54. 54

    […] You have to read these stories because the elements of a free press are the elements of a free society – and the way Rupert Murdoch and his minions run their business, is antithetical to a free press or a free society (as this Telegraph columnist points out). A good place to put this in context is to read the post and the posters at Balloon Juice. […]

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] You have to read these stories because the elements of a free press are the elements of a free society – and the way Rupert Murdoch and his minions run their business, is antithetical to a free press or a free society (as this Telegraph columnist points out). A good place to put this in context is to read the post and the posters at Balloon Juice. […]

Comments are closed.