Give This Dog A Home

henry

If you live in the Philly area and want to help a hungry dog out, drop me an email. This fellow was found by one of our readers starving to death in the cold rain by the side of the road, and he needs a good home. According to the email I got, he is playful, but very weak and hungry.






124 replies
  1. 1
    General Winfield Stuck says:

    This doggie photo chokes me up. Wish I could take him.

  2. 2
    geg6 says:

    OMG, that brings tears to my eyes.

    Can’t do it myself, but I’m emailing all my Philly friends.

  3. 3
    valdivia says:

    just sent out this link to friends. I am not in the area either but hope he finds a home. he looks so scared. Poor thing.

  4. 4
    chuck says:

    oh, that breaks my heart! Has he been taken to the vet yet?

  5. 5
    Cain says:

    Gosh, I don’t know anybody in Philly except my sister-in-law but all her friends are like first generation indians who aren’t the biggest pet adopters since they make frequent trips to India for long periods of time.

    Man, I feel bad now. :( Kudos to the reader who was thoughtful enough to pick him up. May their karma be high and luck awesome.

    cain

  6. 6
    DonkeyKong says:

    Your wistful eyes searched everyone as he passed.
    Stray dog-so lost so starkly and thin,
    And yet your gallant hope held to the last
    That there would come a heart to take you in.

    Some came who jeered at your bewilderment,
    Some kicked you, shouted, threw things till you’d gone
    But oh more cruel was the one who bent
    And petted you and mumered – and went on.

  7. 7
    BigSwami says:

    That dog needs IV/ID fluids, NOW.

  8. 8
    inkadu says:

    Dont think being out of the area prevents you from taking the dog in. It’s not like the dog is going to miss the public libraries in Philly… not because the libraries aren’t great there, but because he probably only uses netflix.

    Seriously. If you live in California, we can probably put together a Balloon-Juice car chain. I can cover a New York / CT leg for a north bound journey (or CT / Mass).

    I wish I had a bigger place.

    Is this dog spayed?

  9. 9

    Aaaaawwwww! Like WC Fields said on his tombstone, “I’d rather be in Philadelphia.” I honestly wish I was in or near Philly so I could adopt the poor pooch (HUGE dog lover from way back). Why anybody would mistreat such a loyal, noble and unconditionally-loving animal is beyond my comprehension.

  10. 10
    Punchy says:

    Is that a pit bull? If so, good luck getting it adopted. Almost certainly a fighting dog let loose.

  11. 11
    Molly says:

    @DonkeyKong: “But oh more cruel was the one who bent
    And petted you and mumered – and went on.”

    That killed me.

    Both my doggy (Lab) and my kitty were this bad when I found them. And they are now the sweetest animals ever. Even though both times I thought my life couldn’t accomodate a new pet, it turned out that my life needed to adjust for THEM. I was the one that needed to change.

    I can’t take him, I live too far away. But I hope someone can.

  12. 12
    moe99 says:

    I emailed my sister who is a veterinarian in Richboro. Maybe she will have an idea. As the owner of 3 dogs, I am teary eyed. Is there something we can do, like donate money to pay for temporary care?

  13. 13
    CaseyL says:

    It’s people like whoever abandoned him that make me hate my species with a fiery passion.

    It’s people like the BJer who took him in that make me think my species can be redeemed.

    I can give a few bucks if that would help, but I live in Seattle with 3 cats, in a townhouse. Not doggy-doable :(

    Bless you, BJ Reader Who Gave That Dog Hope.

  14. 14
    Face says:

    Wow. Bitsy sure looks different in her advertisements.

  15. 15
    Dork says:

    John, call Atrios.

  16. 16
    Sputnik_Sweetheart says:

    He is such a cutie. I wish I lived in Philly so I could take the little guy in.

  17. 17
    slag says:

    So sad! I just talked to some ASPCA folks this weekend and, like everyone else (except Goldman Sachs), they are struggling during this recession. A lot of animals are getting turned out by people who can’t afford them anymore. And, like everything else, state and local governments are cutting back on animal control funding.

    Just another goddamn trickle in the down economy.

  18. 18
    inkadu says:

    @Punchy: Punchy –
    What about being an abandoned pitbull makes you think it’s a fighting dog? Other dogs get abandoned everyday; there’s no greater chance that this dog is a fighter any more than other pitbull (and that’s a pretty low).

    Even if he was being trained to fight, it doesn’t look like he was very good at it. In fact, one scenario running through my mind is that he was starved in an ignorant attempt to get him to fight… if that’s the case, not even being starved was enough; so that would mean this dog has a better disposition than most terriers.

  19. 19
    J.A.F. Rusty Shackleford says:

    I think there should be a moratorium on dog and cat breeders until the population of strays and im-pounded is reduced to a level that doesn’t make me regularly question the ethics and morals of many pet owners in this country.

    Also, folks that want to purchase a dog from a registered breeder should have to submit to an interview at the local veterinarian to determine whether they’re qualified to be a dog or cat owner.

    Just because you want a pet doesn’t mean you’re fit to own one.

  20. 20
    KC says:

    I only have the one friend in Philly, but I’ll write him and see if he’ll pass it around.

    As for adopting pit bulls – the only dogs I’ve ever taken in off the street have been Rotweilers and pit bulls. It’s not that I cruise around looking only for these breeds, those are the breeds that have crossed my path. And to a one, they have been the most gentle and openly affectionate breeds I’ve ever played with or cared for. I think/hope enough people are aware of the individuality of dogs (vs the blanket expectations of breeds) to take a chance on this one.

    KC

  21. 21

    Horrible and sickening. I don’t know anyone in Philly who can take him in, but I am willing to donate to his care. Just say the word, Cole.

    I think there should be a moratorium on dog and cat breeders until the population of strays and im-pounded is reduced to a level that doesn’t make me regularly question the ethics and morals of the many unfit pet owners in this country.
    __
    Also, folks that want to purchase a dog from a registered breeder should have to submit to an interview at the local veterinarian to determine whether they’re qualified to be a dog or cat owner.
    __
    Just because you want a pet doesn’t mean you’re fit to own one.

    I agree with every damn word you wrote. And, may whomever did this to this poor dog DIAF.

    I thought I had the no bold in the blockquote figured out, but I guess not. Just figured it out. There can be no break between the text I wrote and the blockquote. Good to know.

  22. 22
    arguingwithsignposts says:

    Wow. That makes me sick to my stomach. Wish I could help with something other than positive thoughts for that poor pooch.

  23. 23
    Violet says:

    Oh, poor baby. My heart aches just looking at that picture. Much good karma on the reader who rescued the poor doggie. And many hopes that a good forever home can be found.

  24. 24
    Lea says:

    Don’t live anywhere near Philadelphia but would contribute for care.

  25. 25
    arguingwithsignposts says:

    Also, the pitiful condition of this dog is akin to the way people treat each other in this country. It shouldn’t surprise us that people treat their pets this way when they can’t even muster the compassion to treat their fellow human beings any better.

  26. 26

    I put the word out on Twitter and my FB page (2500+ friends-don’t look at me that way, it’s a book marketing thing).

  27. 27
    Pasquinade says:

    Philadelphia PAWS Save-a-Bull Initiative

    http://www.bulladelphia.org/

  28. 28
    Shell says:

    Kudos to the reader who was thoughtful enough to pick him up. May their karma be high and luck

    Rescuing an animal is one way to guarantee you’re going to heaven.

  29. 29
    Svensker says:

    My husband’s cousin works at a no-kill shelter in Philly — don’t remember the name. I’ll track her down and get you the name.

  30. 30
    biblehumper says:

    What Shackleford @ 19 said.

    I’d also like to point out that Philly (and other cities) feature a fair number of human beings stuck out on the streets in that condition.

  31. 31
    Terri says:

    I will gladly contribute to this poor creature’s care.

    I found a dog like this almost 5 years ago. Dirty, starved, flea ridden, and eating from a McDonalds bag that someone had thrown out of their car window. I brought her home, fixed her up, and she’s laying at my feet as I type this. And yes, she’s a pit. Since i picked her up in the “ghetto” she had probably been bred to fight. She never goes anywhere without the company of at least 2 cats, so I have yet to see that fighting instinct come out. Either way, you can’t always succumb to the media imposed hysteria attached to these animals. I tend to judge the assholes that make them that way, more than I do the dogs.

  32. 32
    Chaz says:

    You’re an incurable softie, Mr. Cole. Kudos for speaking up for someone who can’t speak for themselves.

  33. 33
    Cain says:

    @asiangrrlMN:

    Horrible and sickening. I don’t know anyone in Philly who can take him in, but I am willing to donate to his care. Just say the word, Cole.

    Same here. Rev the balloon-juice fundraising machine.. this machine is so much better than the right wing NOISE machine. :-)

    I can probably put a link on facebook too I suppose, but I don’t have a ton of people in my friends list that are from philly.

    Oh yeah, to the person who abandoned this dog. May a thousand fleas infect your pipes.

    cain

  34. 34
    Svensker says:

    @Pasquinade:

    Philadelphia PAWS Save-a-Bull Initiative
    http://www.bulladelphia.org/

    I’m pretty sure that’s the one because last I heard she was working on pitbull rescue.

  35. 35
    Punchy says:

    @Dork: Or Boys II Men

  36. 36
    MattR says:

    As much as I would love to help that poor dog out, and to give my Ellie a friend to play with, I just don’t think I can manage two dogs in a 1 BR apt. However, I am defiinitely willing to help in other ways ($$, driving, supplies) to get that poor thing to a good home. I could even foster him for a bit if need be.

  37. 37
    LV says:

    Pit bull = banned breed in many areas.

    Unfortunately, because of the breeds popularity in the fighting circuit, many areas in both U.S. and Canada have a blanket ban on the breed.

    Pit bull rescue groups might offer the best bet.

  38. 38
    comrade scott's agenda of rage says:

    I’ve done transport before and can do legs here, if needed.

    That would be here in Misery. Get the dog to St Louis and I can get it to KC.

  39. 39
    BigSwami says:

    @Terri: I think that’s an important thing to understand about all kinds of bull terriers, a fact that gets completely overlooked as the most relevant facts usually do: Pit bulls are not prized for their strength in fighting. They are strong, and fast, no doubt, but there are much tougher dogs. The reason that dogfighting operations prize them so greatly is rather because of the breed’s relentless drive to please their owners. They fight because they know their owners want them to fight, and they want to be good dogs.

    Anyone here who’s owned a pit bull can verify this. They are so eager to please that they fall all over themselves trying to do so. They wouldn’t think twice about killing another dog if it meant a pat of approval from their masters.

  40. 40
    MattR says:

    I am not quite sure how to describe the fact that driving an hour each way to visit my mother is too much hassle, but I am willing to drive several hours out of my way to pick up and transport a random dog from people I have never actually met. Should I be proud or disturbed (or both)?

  41. 41
    Pete Coyle says:

    @Punchy:

    I’ve rescued fighting dogs before. They are wonderful. The only thing wrong with pit bulls are people. Remember the Little Rascals had a pit bull.

  42. 42
    Seanly says:

    As an owner of a found dog (and one of the pups she was carrying), it breaks my heart to see this poor fellow and know that I am too far away to help. I join the call to raise some money for the pooch.

    So rescuing animals gets one into heaven? Sweet! Being a atheist and all, I wasn’t sure how I would cover the possibility that I was wrong. I think the total tally covers my wife and me pretty well.

    I’m gonna give my dogs extra long hugs this evening.

  43. 43
    The Saff says:

    @Cain: I’m in if there’s fund raising needed to find this dog dolly a home (we’re at capacity with 3 cats and 1 dog). Anyone that mistreats/abuses an animal is the lowest form of life and should be dealt with harshly.

  44. 44
    Mnemosyne says:

    We have three kitties in a small apartment, so no dogs for us. The one good thing about the bad reputation that pit bulls have received is that many places will spay or neuter them for free — the humane society in Pasadena (Calif.) that arranged for our kitten’s spaying today does that, and I believe it’s a county-wide program.

  45. 45
    comrade scott's agenda of rage says:

    Should I be proud or disturbed (or both)?

    Proud. But see your therapist right away.

    As for all the “oh noes he’s a pitbull” nonsense, thanks to everybody else trying to set the record straight. They are wonderful dogs. I’ve been involved in plenty of pitty rescue here in Misery and down in New Orleans after Katrina and it’s silly to jump to any conclusions about this dog based strictly on the fact it’s got some pitty in him. Oi vey.

    The whole “pit bulls are dangerous” mania is *no* different than what I heard in the 60s about German Shepherds then in the 70s about Dobermans. The latter is one of the weeniest dog breeds imagineable.

  46. 46
    Shell says:

    Add my voice to those sticking up for pits. My Katie is a pit bull mix, and I think she has sugar water running thru her veins rather than blood.

  47. 47
    Comrade Darkness says:

    @inkadu: I can do a leg in the wilds of up-upstate NY if anyone in the “greater” (ehem) NY can take him. I can meet a Philly driver somewhere near the border… Really, BJers, if you have a home for him but are out of range, we’ll get him there.

    As endearing as that darling face is, we travel WAY too much for a dog. We have cats trained to sleep while we are away and accept attention from the neighbor boy in our absence.

  48. 48
    Chief says:

    I’m near Dayton, OH. i have one rescue dog. I wish I could help.

    Please keep us posted.

  49. 49
    EEH says:

    Damn, now I’m sitting here with tears in my eyes. Our youngest kitty was acquired in much the same condition when she was a kitten, only her medium length coat hid it until we picked her up. Needless to say, she’s one of our best cats, ever. I’ll never forget the cry she gave out the first time we fed her.

    I’m with the others regarding donating funds, I would love to do so to help out this poor guy. This just breaks my heart.

  50. 50
    The Moar You Know says:

    This is utterly heartbreaking; the dog is starved (and I agree with the above commentor that the dog needs some IV fluid ASAP) and obviously terrified.

    I can’t take her. I would if I could, but I have no room (and the cat would freak). But I can and will give money, just give the word, John.

  51. 51
    Tim Fuller says:

    I had to leave my two rescue pit bulls in America when I moved to Germany a couple months ago because they aren’t welcome here. My oldest stepson is looking after them back in the USA and they are watching the house for him. Pit bulls aren’t for everybody, but they are surely not the killer dogs they are made out to be. The one in the picture is obviously not too aggressive or you’d never have caught him in the first place. My oldest pit was a rescue stray likely abandoned during Katrina when all the folks had to leave their dogs. She was in worse shape than the one you have. Hope somebody there in Philly has an open heart/home for him.

    Enjoy.

  52. 52
    Matt says:

    Thank you John for posting this. My wife and I found this dog, whom we have named Henry. Since I emailed John, his page was published on Petfinder. We have two pit bull rescues at home already and are causing a bit of stress for Henry, which is why we need to get him a home ASAP. We work with a local organization called Cares4Pets made up of vets and vet students who checked him out yesterday. He’s doing amazingly well considering the circumstances.

    Cares4Pets may have found someone to take him in temporarily, but the person has a cat and Henry needs to be cat tested first. The ideal situation is to find a very calm environment where he can receive lots of attention. He’ll be a wonderful dog, but the next week in particular are crucial to his recovery, which is why I asked John for help.

    For those who are interested in contributing monetarily, please contribute to Cares4Pets. They spend a lot of time (and their own money) rehabilitating animals and finding forever homes for them. They drive incredible distances to make it happen and are at every adoption event in the area. Since the core of the organization is made up of vets and vet students, they specialize in injured animals who would be euthanized if taken to a typical shelter. Right now the organization is basically just a network of foster homes, but is raising money to build a shelter. They are a 501c3 organization so contributions are tax deductible. Sorry for the long endorsement, but I wanted to emphasize that if you do decide to donate, your money will be used very efficiently.

    Again, finding a home is more important than money now, so I would be especially grateful to anyone who can spread the word.

  53. 53
    annie says:

    I also will contribute if needed. I just cannot stand to see an animal suffer. Please let us know what we can do.

  54. 54
    Liz says:

    Greetings folks. I love this blog for this very reason. I myself own two rescues and wish to hell we had room for more (husband would divorce me I’m sure).

    It’s great to know that a) i will get into heaven, and b) someone else dreads visiting family as much as I do.

    I don’t doubt for a second this pup will get adopted…the power of pictures and networking is amazing. If all else fails put him up on petfinder. They rock.

  55. 55
    Punchy says:

    @Pete Coyle: I never, ever said I had anything against pit bulls. All I said was, good luck trying to get him/her adopted. There are lots of areas where this breed is banned. This makes it very difficult to find a qualified adoptor.

  56. 56
    The Moar You Know says:

    @Matt: Matt, you are a wonderful human being, and I don’t say that about too many folks.

  57. 57
    Face says:

    Pit bulls not dangerous, eh? Let’s have a look

    Let’s hone in on this blurb:

    According to the Clifton study, pit bulls, Rottweilers, Presa Canarios and their mixes are responsible for 74% of attacks that were included in the study, 68% of the attacks upon children, 82% of the attacks upon adults, 65% of the deaths, and 68% of the maimings. In more than two-thirds of the cases included in the study, the life-threatening or fatal attack was apparently the first known dangerous behavior by the animal in question. Clifton states:
    …..
    If almost any other dog has a bad moment, someone may get bitten, but will not be maimed for life or killed, and the actuarial risk is accordingly reasonable. If a pit bull terrier or a Rottweiler has a bad moment, often someone is maimed or killed–and that has now created off-the-chart actuarial risk, for which the dogs as well as their victims are paying the price.
    …..
    Clifton’s opinions are as interesting as his statistics. For example, he says, “Pit bulls and Rottweilers are accordingly dogs who not only must be handled with special precautions, but also must be regulated with special requirements appropriate to the risk they may pose to the public and other animals, if they are to be kept at all.”

    and this:

    In recent years, the dogs responsible for the bulk of the homicides are pit bulls and Rottweilers:
    …..
    “Studies indicate that pit bull-type dogs were involved in approximately a third of human DBRF (i.e., dog bite related fatalities) reported during the 12-year period from 1981 through1992, and Rottweilers were responsible for about half of human DBRF reported during the 4 years from 1993 through 1996….[T]he data indicate that Rottweilers and pit bull-type dogs accounted for 67% of human DBRF in the United States between 1997 and 1998. It is extremely unlikely that they accounted for anywhere near 60% of dogs in the United States during that same period and, thus, there appears to be a breed-specific problem with fatalities.” (Sacks JJ, Sinclair L, Gilchrist J, Golab GC, Lockwood R. Breeds of dogs involved in fatal human attacks in the United States between 1979 and 1998. JAVMA 2000;217:836-840.)

    Not all pit bulls are bad, but to say their rep is some sort of phantom media-influence bullshit is….well, bullshit.

  58. 58
    Lizzy L says:

    Just (in the last month) I rescued from the street a forlorn, smart, loving 2 year old pit bull — I’ve named her Midnight. This is now a 2 dog, 2 cat household. The consensus in my neighborhood is that a family in foreclosure chose to abandon her rather than give her to a shelter: they are all overflowing and even the no-kill shelters won’t take dogs (especially pits) unless they are neutered and can pass their temperament tests. Midnight lucked out — she found me, and my friends who helped to pay for her vet care.

    I hope the dog in the photo finds a home.

  59. 59
    EEH says:

    @Punchy: Yes, Punchy is right about that. The City and County of Denver where I live bans Pit Bulls (and mixes containing Pit Bull) within city limits.

  60. 60
    inkadu says:

    @BigSwami: They wouldn’t think twice about killing another dog if it meant a pat of approval from their masters.

    You’re making this dog out to be a Republican. It’s not helping his chances here.

    @MattR: I sometimes feel guilty about my imbalanced love for animals. I’d sooner euthanize a person than a dog. I think there’s a lot of factors involved… Dogs aren’t responsible for their lot in life (I don’t think people are either, but that’s another philosophical debate); they are a lot less annoying than people (for the most part); their needs are simple (walk, food, walk, warmth); they never hog your bandwidth; they never feel sorry for themselves, even if they’re in pain or have lost a limb…

  61. 61

    I’ll add my voice to the ones who want to help, but can’t do it by adopting, but I sure can contribute some $$ to the cause if need be. Just say the word.

  62. 62
    Cain says:

    @Matt:

    Thank you Matt. He looks like he would make a wonderful friend for someone. I was going to name him “Mongo” though. :-)

    cain

  63. 63

    and damn you John Cole for making me cry at work.

  64. 64

    @Matt: I’ll send them a donation as soon as I get home Matt and my local shelter as well, just ’cause.

  65. 65
    elmo says:

    Right now I have eleven dogs in my house. One is a pit that I picked up last December, in barely better condition than Henry, and frostbitten to boot. Two are Great Pyrennees that my partner found tied to a gas station dumpster in the middle of the night — the manager said they’d been there all day. One is a Chihuahua-French Bulldog mix that I found starving at the dump. I call him a Taco Bull.

    On Saturday I made a five-hour round trip drive to help get two rescue dogs from North Carolina across Tennessee. We took two legs of a multi-leg transport.

    Matt, I can’t take Henry myself, and if I knew of a good adoptive home for a pit, I’d have placed Nicky (my rescue pit) by now. But I can drive anywhere within a three-hour radius of Knoxville, Tennessee, and I would be pleased to help if I can.

    May the FSM bless you with endless meatballs for picking up Henry.

  66. 66

    There’s a beautiful dog under there somewhere, for sure. Too bad my apartment doesn’t allow pets. I gotta get out of this place, as I’m starting to really hate stupid rules like that.

  67. 67
    inkadu says:

    @Face: The flaw in your analysis is concluding the problem is with the breed instead of the owners, or the breed instead of their relative numbers, or the breed and their proximity to people, or the breed and the economic situation of their owners. All those factors could easily (and I think do) explain your statistics.

  68. 68
    SadieSue says:

    Oh, I so, so wish I could take him but we have 5 rescued cats & a tiny house & yard. I’ve posted the link to my Facebook in the hopes that I know someone or one of my friends knows someone who can help. I really hope he finds a home asap – I could use a story with a happy ending right about now.

    And Matt – thank you so much for stopping & picking him up. You & your wife are my heroes.

  69. 69
    Cain says:

    @Lizzy L:

    Just (in the last month) I rescued from the street a forlorn, smart, loving 2 year old pit bull—I’ve named her Midnight. This is now a 2 dog, 2 cat household. The consensus in my neighborhood is that a family in foreclosure chose to abandon her rather than give her to a shelter: they are all overflowing and even the no-kill shelters won’t take

    God, that must be so agonizing.. I don’t know what I would do in that situation.. ugh. Leaving your pet behind.. it’s the stuff of nightmares.

    cain

  70. 70
    J.A.F. Rusty Shackleford says:

    @BigSwami:

    I’m fairly certain the reason why pit bulls are used as fighting dogs is because of the power of their jaws, not because they want to please their owner.

  71. 71
    Mnemosyne says:

    @Face:

    If almost any other dog has a bad moment, someone may get bitten, but will not be maimed for life or killed, and the actuarial risk is accordingly reasonable. If a pit bull terrier or a Rottweiler has a bad moment, often someone is maimed or killed—and that has now created off-the-chart actuarial risk, for which the dogs as well as their victims are paying the price.

    That’s actually more to the point. As far as a bite goes, you are far, far more likely to bitten by a “safe” dog like a cocker spaniel. But pit bulls and similar dogs are large and strong, so even though they don’t bite nearly as often, it’s more likely that the bite will be fatal.

    The problem, though, is that people think that “more likely” means “only way” and do incredibly stupid things like leave a newborn baby alone with their Pomeranian when you should never, ever leave an infant or child alone with any animal no matter how “safe” you assume that animal is.

  72. 72
    elmo says:

    Mnemosyne: so true. So very very true. Can’t be said often enough — big strong dogs don’t bite people nearly as often as little dogs.

  73. 73
    CaseyL says:

    Contribution made, and FSM bless Matt and Cares4Pets – and all the other good folk helping Henry.

  74. 74
    RedKitten says:

    Poor baby — I just want to give him a nice big steak and then let him lay on my lap so I can skritch his ears. It depresses the hell out of me when I think about how some people are so evil that they could abuse animals, kids, or anybody/thing smaller or weaker than themselves. I have to deliberately turn my mind away from it, or wind up on happy pills.

    Anyway, money’s tight, but I’m echoing everybody else’s sentiments — if funds are needed for that pooch’s care, I could chip in enough for a bit of kibble, at least.

  75. 75
    RedKitten says:

    @Mnemosyne:

    The problem, though, is that people think that “more likely” means “only way” and do incredibly stupid things like leave a newborn baby alone with their Pomeranian when you should never, ever leave an infant or child alone with any animal no matter how “safe” you assume that animal is.

    Exactly. I know some incredibly gentle, well-behaved dogs who just adore kids. However, I would never, ever, ever, ever, ever even think for a second of leaving Sam alone with any of them. And even then, when I’m holding him and they’re checking him out, I’m very much on my guard. Dogs are wonderful creatures, but they don’t think like we do, and one just never knows what might suddenly trigger some long-dormant predatory instinct.

  76. 76
    Face says:

    @inkadu: Did you read this part?

    ….[T]he data indicate that Rottweilers and pit bull-type dogs accounted for 67% of human DBRF in the United States between 1997 and 1998. It is extremely unlikely that they accounted for anywhere near 60% of dogs in the United States during that same period and, thus, there appears to be a breed-specific problem with fatalities.”

    Rots and Pit bulls did not make up anywhere close to the % of owned dogs. Yet they made up 67% of bites/mauls/deaths. This says it’s a breed problem–yes, associated with the owners.

    And note that the concern isn’t that bulls simply bite more often–hell, many dogs will bite. It’s that once bulls attack, they go for the kill many times. Ergo, their relative danger.

  77. 77
    Matt says:

    I made a mistake coding the last post with the link. The address for Cares4Pets is http://www.cares4pets.org. Hopefully that works. My wife emailed me that she is amazed by the responses here. So am I. I really appreciate it. She locked our guys up in the bedroom to play with Henry and came away with this picture.

    Also, she got an estimate from the vet student who checked out Henry yesterday and the bill will likely be $300-$500. If you want to help cover it, please use the paypal link on the Cares4Pets website. They also have a PO box, but I’m not sure what it is, so please email them to find out where to mail checks. Please mention that the money is being donated for Henry so they can keep track.

    We really appreciate all of your support.

  78. 78
    Mnemosyne says:

    @Face:

    Rots and Pit bulls did not make up anywhere close to the % of owned dogs. Yet they made up 67% of bites/mauls/deaths.

    What do you mean by “bites/mauls/deaths”? Are you counting only fatal bites, or all bites? All of the statistics I’ve seen have said that smaller dogs are much more likely to bite than larger ones, so it seems very strange to claim that Rots and pit bulls are responsible for 67% of bites.

  79. 79
    elmo says:

    Mnem:

    And “bites/mauls/deaths” is a useless statistic anyway, because most dog bites aren’t reported to anyone, and don’t show up in these statistics. The stats start off skewed toward bites that cause serious injury, and then even those bites are buried in a larger pool of “bites/mauls/deaths.” For evaluating whether a particular breed of dog is likely to bite, it’s worse than useless.

  80. 80
    comrade scott's agenda of rage says:

    There’s $25. Again, if he needs to be transported, I can do anything to get him thru Missouri quickly and safely.

  81. 81
  82. 82
    Max says:

    Donation made. I’m at my 1 dog limit per my landlord.

    P.S. Glenn Greenwald tweeted a link to this page, so that’s good. Yea for the power of the people.

  83. 83
    TEL says:

    @Face: For some accurate information about dog bites from the CDC, try this link: http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecr.....ntion.html

    You know what you won’t find on this page? Dog bites by breed. There are several good reasons for this, mentioned by other posters already. In the CDC’s own words “There is currently no accurate way to identify the number of dogs of a particular breed, and consequently no measure to determine which breeds are more likely to bite or kill.”

  84. 84
    gogol's wife says:

    @Matt:

    The address is Cares4pets, PO Box 31942, Philadelphia, PA 19104-1942.

  85. 85
    annie says:

    @Matt:

    Thanks Matt and thanks to your family. Will make a donation to Cares4Pets. Please give us updated on Henry’s recovery.

  86. 86
    Mike T says:

    @Mnemosyne:

    Face’s own comment upthread stated 67% of “dog bite related fatalities”, but an hour later he’s claiming it’s 67% of all “bites/mauls/deaths”.

  87. 87

    She locked our guys up in the bedroom to play with Henry and came away with this picture

    That one goes in the “so ugly he’s cute” column.

  88. 88
    Face says:

    @Mike T: It’s fatalities, not just bites. I was unclear. Obviously, a fatality is of much greater concern than a mere bite. Thus, their penchant for being banned by communities, and the reputation they hold for being more likely to kill. Which, again, seems to be a reasonable fear.

  89. 89
    Common Sense says:

    Aren’t pits a cross breed? How the fuck to you ban a breed that can be created when two legal breeds procreate?

  90. 90

    @Matt: Matt, you did such a good thing picking up this sweet boy. Donation made. I don’t know anyone in the Philly area. I would, however, be willing to help transport him through MN if need be.

    The sweetest, most loving dog I ever met was mostly pit. I agree that if a pit bites, it’s more deadly. The sad fact is that a lot of macho, punkass assholes get pits for that very reason and then deliberately teach them (the pits) to be aggressive. It’s definitely the fault of those asshole owners rather than of the dogs.

  91. 91

    @Matt: I just clicked on this picture. Henry is so sweet-looking. Lots of luck with him.

    Face, I would be more concerned as to who are adopting the animals than the animals themselves.

  92. 92
    anonevent says:

    Is this the AT&T commercial in reverse?

  93. 93
    ericvsthem says:

    Wish I could take this guy in (I live in the Philly area, and I own a house with a fenced in yard) if even for a few months. But we already have a 3 year old male Airedale (another very powerful terrier breed) and 2 month old baby boy.. which is all my wife and I can deal with at the moment.

    I will put a post up on Facebook linking to this thread when I get home from work. Some of my Philly friends have adopted pit bulls in the past and may be able to help.

  94. 94
    sarah in brooklyn says:

    please keep us updated about henry – i can tell he’s a sweetheart, and i’m sure he’ll find a good home. thanks for helping him.

  95. 95
    Mike T says:

    @Face:

    We all make mistakes sometimes Face, but this was a particularly big one. According to teh google, dog bite fatalities in the US range between 23 and 35 from 2006-2008, but total dog bites in the US average roughly 15,000 per year over that same time span. Yes, it’s true, that pit bulls and rotts account for the bulk of the fatalities but we’re talking about a miniscule number of deaths here. In 2008 more people were struck and killed by lightning than by dog bites.

  96. 96
    Terri says:

    Face:
    Since you seem to be rather concerned, here’s a bit of advice. Don’t ever, ever, ever, ever, adopt a pit bull. Or a pit bull mix. Mkay? Enough of the hand wringing.
    It’s always amazing to me, when you hear of a story like this, there always has to be someone who wants to piss on everybody’s parade.

  97. 97
    gil mann says:

    Thus, their penchant for being banned by communities, and the reputation they hold for being more likely to kill. Which, again, seems to be a reasonable fear.

    You forgot their other penchant, their penchant to be used as ambulatory killer phallic symbols by shitheels.

    Not to blow your mind with a nurture over nature argument or anything.

  98. 98
    Skepticat says:

    Kudos to you and your wife, Matt, not mention Cares4Pets. I certainly hope that there’ll be a Lily-like story with Henry.

    And MattR, probably proud and disturbed both, which may be why you’re here.

  99. 99
    Neutron Flux says:

    This is mirror image of my dog Jack. He was dropped off at our place a couple of years ago. Sweet sweet boy.

    First time I took him to the vet, he peed all over the exam table. Humiliating. Big bad assed pitbull. Not.

    He absolutely adores the grandkids.

    I am careful with him Face, I know the numbers, but I strongly believe that they only mirror their alpha. If the alpha is an asshole, so is the dog.

    PS I do not think he would like BOB.

  100. 100
    C. Smith says:

    The current pit bull “problem” is due to a number of factors. As said upthread, pits were bred to be good with people and eager to please. Fighting dogs are often pulled apart by their handlers, and any dog that bit its handler wouldn’t last long. So, really, the worst thing you can say about the breed is that they might be dog aggressive.

    Now, the difference between a well-bred pit and a BYB pit can affect temperament. As can training, socialization, mental and physical stimulation, and whether or not the dog has been spayed or neutered. Show me a poorly bred, unaltered male dog chained to a tree 24/7, and I’ll show you a maladjusted, possibly dangerous dog. As well, dogs will often issue “corrective” bites to other animals or family members when the dog feels that the other animal/person has been out of line. Generally it’s meant to be a nip, a warning like a pinch or a tap, but if a big dog does this to a small child’s face the damage is increased. The dog isn’t doing anything wrong per se, it’s just being a dog within a pack/family situation. But there’s another bite statistic to be twisted and misinterpreted.

    Well-bred pit bulls are sweet, strong, well-rounded dogs. Pits have won agility and weight-pulling championships, and are considered prime candidates for the Canine Good Citizen award. They are not dogs for novice owners, but the right pit with the right owner is a thing of beauty. Poor breeding and poor handling have given the breed a bad reputation, and it is the legitimate breeders, owners, and breed enthusiasts who are suffering. People looking for “tough dogs” have moved on to Rottweilers and Staffordshire Bull Terriers, among other breeds.

    Anyway, best of luck to Henry. I’d love to take him, but I live in Ontario, land of the asinine pit bull ban, put into place without any input from veterinary experts. Henry will make some lucky person or people very happy, as they will him.

  101. 101
    Mnemosyne says:

    @Face:

    Actually, it seems to be more related to the American tendency to over-exaggerate some threats and underestimate others. There were a few high-profile stories about people being killed by pit bulls that formed an impression in peoples’ minds that it was something that was common when it was not.

    It’s like the people who keep their child indoors at all times in their quiet suburb because they’re terrified of them being abducted by a stranger but don’t bother to put the child in a car seat when they drive them to preschool. Sure, the one danger gets all of the publicity, but the other one is far, far more likely to actually injure or kill the child.

  102. 102
    RedKitten says:

    @ericvsthem:

    Wish I could take this guy in (I live in the Philly area, and I own a house with a fenced in yard) if even for a few months. But we already have a 3 year old male Airedale (another very powerful terrier breed) and 2 month old baby boy.. which is all my wife and I can deal with at the moment.

    No kidding. A friend of mine is looking for a new home for her 11-month old female Airedale. We love the breed (my husband’s family always had an Airedale or two when he was growing up), but with a 2-month old baby, I’m really not sure that I’m able to take on the extra work and expense of a dog, as much as I’d love to adopt her.

  103. 103
    feebog says:

    We have had our rescue dog, Cappi, for just three weeks. When we got him he still had kennel cough, a bad case of of the dog trots and an ear infection. It only took a few days of antibiotics to clear things up. This poor guy will liven up with some TLC. Hope this turns out well.

  104. 104
    falloch says:

    At 19, j.a.f. rusty:#

    “Also, folks that want to purchase a dog from a registered breeder should have to submit to an interview at the local veterinarian to determine whether they’re qualified to be a dog or cat owner.

    Just because you want a pet doesn’t mean you’re fit to own one.”
    #

    What if we had the same procedure for people who wanted to procreate? Who would be the interviewers? Who would decide? To be honest with you, I wish there _was_ a way to screen prospective parents, but somehow I don’t think this will make it onto the statute books. Repugs would prevent anyone who is not white, heterosexual and Bible thumpin’ from becoming parents; while those on the left would wish that Repugs could be prevented from procreating, but wouldn’t necessarily spend a lot of time on legislating for it.

    BTW, my cat is a rescue cat – and he is now the fattest (too fat), sassiest cat in the known universe. If loving care bestows confidence, then that’s what he’s got now. With love, that dog in the picture will be the same. His coat markings are beautiful. All he needs is love – and a good meal. Wherever you live, donate to your local animal rescue! And your local homeless shelter too! If you’ve got clothes that are decent and you haven’t worn in the past two years, take them to your local homeless shelter or volunteer group! You don’t need them, and somebody else does!

  105. 105
    Raincitygirl says:

    I’m afraid I’m not in a position to help. I’m in Canada, and I live in a condo with size and breed restrictions, and most importantly, given what my rescue cat did to the last dog he met, I think the poor dog would get his/her a$% kicked by the cat.

    However, while I have not yet seen anything about a PayPal account to which money could be sent, if something could be set up, I’d be happy to kick in a bit of money.

    I second (third? fourth?) the person who says the dog may need veterinary attention and possibly IV fluids. Also, if he’s been starved (I hate people!), he should only be fed small amounts at a time, or he’s likely to just bring it right back up again. Small amounts of food at regular intervals are more likely to stay down. Also, I know he looks grown-up, but puppy food is preferable to adult dog food, as it has a higher nutritional content and less filler. If he’s getting puppy food in small amounts and STILL puking it up, he should go to the vet. They can either get him on IV fluids, or provide you with a liquefied food he’s likely to tolerate better than solid food. Again, more than happy to pitch in financially, so just say the word.

  106. 106
    maya says:

    I got my rescue pit bull back in June. He is the nicest, friendliest dog I’ve had since the last friendly pit bull cross and her pup that I had for over 17 years. Bud doesn’t bark much, which is OK, but he loves to run and leap like a deer. I just clicked my donation for Henry at cares4pets too. Somebody will be getting a great dog.

  107. 107

    Okay, first thing I did when I got home was make that donation. Please keep us up to date Matt, that picture link was beautiful.

  108. 108
    maya says:

    @Raincitygirl: Check out Matt @ #77 above. The paypal link is at the cares4pets web address.

  109. 109
    sylvia says:

    Bless his heart – Thank goodness he was picked up. It’s amazing how quickly you can get some meat on those bones when there is food to eat. This is what my rescued dog looked like, Little Bitsy, skin and bones when we got her. Good luck with finding a good home for him! I’m sure he’ll make a wonderful dog. These rescue dogs seem to know how lucky they are!

  110. 110
    mp1900 says:

    I got a rescue dog from a great rescue place, and I’m not able to take another, but I did put this on my Facebook page. Bless you, Matt.

  111. 111
    metalgirl says:

    @Skepticat: Love MattR’s diagnosis – classic! While I’m 8 hours away from my parents, I’d probably have the same conflicted feeling if they were 1 hour away.

    @Neutron Flux: PS I do not think he would like BOB. – Right on!

    I have a pit mix I inherited (via ex-husband’s death). When he was around, I was the “biscuit lady”, giving her a treat when she came over or when I went there. She was only friendly when he or my boys were around (so I couldn’t take care of her when he was gone). After she moved to my house (only 3 streets away), she was my girl in less than a week. She appears vicious if I’m here and you are driving a UPS truck or similar, however, I’ve hosted MANY MoveOn and Obama events and the only danger is that she will beat you with her wagging tail! She just wants to sniff people’s shoes and pants below the knees. She was a rescue dog and we’re still in touch with her foster mom who named her Suzie Q :)

  112. 112
    dbomp says:

    *sigh* I’d love to have another dog, and I even live in the Philly burbs, but I already have a pitbull mix named Henry and it’d be confusing to have two. (That, and I’d be afraid to have two male pits. My Henry is terrific with people and decent enough to cats, but wants to dominate other dogs just too much.)

  113. 113
    Matt says:

    A quick update. Henry was pretty lively today and was bouncing around our living room. He’s a completely different dog than when we found him on Saturday. He was cat tested and doesn’t show any aggression. At this point I’m going to guess we’ll have to keep him for a bit to find a suitable foster home.

    Thanks to all of you who made donations. When we checked in with Cares4Pets several hours ago they had received seven donations, all of which I’m sure were from readers of this blog. And to those of you who volunteered to drive Henry, your offers are way too generous. While he’s regaining his health he shouldn’t do much traveling. I don’t think finding a forever home will be that difficult once he’s up to his normal weight.

    In the meantime, we still appreciate help finding a foster home (or forever home for that matter). Much thanks to all of you.

  114. 114
    satby says:

    Matt and everyone, use caution when looking for a foster or permanent home for Henry. Rescues have been “adopted” by dog fighters to use as bait dogs. Just be sure to screen anyone who you don’t know.
    And as a general breed, pit bulls score better on the Safer temperment test we use before releasing dogs for transport or adoption than golden retrievers do (and now I can’t find the cite)

  115. 115

    Thanks for the tip, Maya. Guess I missed that one.

  116. 116
    Jackie says:

    Live in Washington St. Willing to contribute $ to help.

  117. 117

    Have put in ten bucks American through PayPal and designated it to Henry.

    Awesome updated photo of Henry, Matt. Amazing how fast animals’ health rebounds and how fast they get that chipper look back in their eyes once somebody, you know, FEEDS THEM. Assholes. Not you, Matt.

  118. 118
    gogol's wife says:

    @Matt:
    I sent a contribution for Henry via snail mail. Thank you for doing this good thing. I’m praying (to the real One, not FSM) for you to find a great home for him. Sorry I don’t know anyone in Philadelphia these days.

  119. 119
    Devon Cole says:

    Hey- What is the update on this dog? How can I help?

  120. 120
    Matt says:

    As far as I know, we haven’t found anyone to take him. We’ll be getting a second crate tomorrow, which will really help with our foster dog. The foster dog was being crate trained, which kind of got derailed when Henry had to use the crate. Anyway, that makes our lives a bit easier.

    I’ll give another update tonight when I talk to my wife and spend some time with Henry.

  121. 121
    Devon Cole says:

    Please keep me posted as to what you need. The poor baby. Thank you for saving him.

  122. 122
    Comrade Scrutinizer says:

    Testing, again

  123. 123
    Lori says:

    @SadieSue: They are my heroes as well, and I am so proud that they are my daughter and son-in-law. I know they will find the right home for Henry…or a larger apartment for themselves…

  124. 124
    dbomp says:

    I met Henry today at the Delco SPCA “Bark In The Park”. That is one handsome dog!

    It was his foster sister Ebony who took my heart, though. Beautiful girl..

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