And Why Is All of This Important?

And why is it so important that we get the story right regarding the response at the Local, State, and Federal level?

Because a boatload of money is at stake:

Louisiana’s congressional delegation has requested $40 billion for Army Corps of Engineers projects in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, about 10 times the annual Corps budget for the entire nation, or 16 times the amount the Corps has said it would need to protect New Orleans from a Category 5 hurricane.

Louisiana Sens. David Vitter (R) and Mary Landrieu (D) tucked the request into their $250 billion Hurricane Katrina Disaster Relief and Economic Recovery Act, the state’s opening salvo in the scramble for federal dollars.

The bill, unveiled last week, would create a powerful “Pelican Commission” controlled by Louisiana residents that would decide which Corps projects to fund, and ordered the commission to consider several controversial navigation projects that have nothing to do with flood protection. The Corps section of the Louisiana bill, which was supported by the entire state delegation, was based on recommendations from a “working group” dominated by lobbyists for ports, shipping firms, energy companies and other corporate interests.

I can see why we wouldn’t want facts to get in the way of the ‘story.’

(h/t and a bunch of commentary at Instapundit)






25 replies
  1. 1
    ET says:

    …consider several controversial navigation projects that have nothing to do with flood protection……

    Ok this is just downright scarry – it is also soo typical for LA. Trusting the locals with setting priorities! ACK! The politics of the state being what they are (and it has nothing to do with Dem v. Repub thing) this does not bode well. North LA and southwest LA do not like the greater N.O. area and have in the past resisted what they would say is the big elephant in the room. N.O. doesn’t appreciate the rest of the state – and arrogantly feels that is the only important place in LA. These groups may work at a cross purpose more often than not. Then there is the outright corruption which is much a bigger deal (at least to me) than incompetence.

  2. 2
    Kimmitt says:

    was based on recommendations from a “working group” dominated by lobbyists for ports, shipping firms, energy companies and other corporate interests.

    I used to watch “Animaniacs” when I was a younger version of myself, and I still recall the Anvilania episode, especially the running gag where Dot says, in a resigned tone, “Again? Oh, all right.”

  3. 3
    DougJ says:

    It is important to get the story right. That’s why there needs to be an independent commission. Heads should roll at the local, state, and federal levels. And not just the head of one former horse breeder.

  4. 4
    John S. says:

    I used to watch “Animaniacs” when I was a younger version of myself, and I still recall the Anvilania episode, especially the running gag where Dot says, in a resigned tone, “Again? Oh, all right.”

    Let the anvils ring…

  5. 5
    Shygetz says:

    Blech. We really should have a “reset” option on every ballot we cast. This is just disgusting.

  6. 6
    jobiuspublius says:

    I’m sure that if KBR had writen a solution to this problem prior to Katrinas arrival then there would be no possible waste or fraud here. Hey, let’s cost-plus contract LA so Haliburton. That’ll fix them.

  7. 7
    Nash says:

    Possibly the most appropriate typo in the history of typos:

    Louisiana Sens. David Vitter®

    Republican Senators are so much for sale, they now come with trademarks.

  8. 8
    jobiuspublius says:

    Speaking of money, and time, what has Worst-POTUS-Ever done all these years? He seems to have made it easier for his cronys to plunder us at our worst possible moments. He’s turned our government into a contract mill for his cronys. Yes there will be boat-loads of money sailing away, but, let’s not look at who’s already getting tons of it and reaching for more power. Let’s focus on the smaller fish while our government get drowned in the bathtub to our detriment.

  9. 9
    kenB says:

    Possibly the most appropriate typo

    Actually not a typo but a case of this blog engine trying to be helpful by automatically changing “&#40R)” to “®”. You can make it happen in the comments as well — try it!

  10. 10
    stickler says:

    Let’s see: (R)

    Hey, cool!

  11. 11
    Joe Y says:

    The worst theft of all is the way those thieving Lousiana Republicans went right out and started calling themselves “Democrats” just as soon as Reconstruction ended. And they’re still at it!

  12. 12

    Who’s complaining about whose exaggerations?

    Everybody makes mistakes, and I try not to dwell on assigning blame because it isn’t generally productive of much. Usually when someone tries to avoid responsibility for assigning blame to others, I’m not terribly impressed, unless it appears that th…

  13. 13
    pmm says:

    I’m starting to think that jobiuspublius is the right-wing equivalent of a DougJ riff. We get it: the President is ‘history’s greatest monster’. Check. Now, what do your posts have to do with the price of tea in China?

  14. 14
    jobiuspublius says:

    How relatively significant is Broussard?

  15. 15
    jobiuspublius says:

    And why is it so important that we get the story right regarding the response at the Local, State, and Federal level?

    How dare those upstarts, Vitter and Landrieu — obviuosly, Blanco’s Puppets — move in on Worst-POTUS-Ever’s cronyism. It’s his mandate not theirs.

    one GOP Senate aide said they should not expect to get their entire wish list, voicing particular skepticism of the funding for the Corps

    Funding, not good. On the other hand:

    The bill would exempt any Corps projects approved by the commission from provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Clean Water Act.

    That, not so bad. It’s the funding, stupid.

    It’s all Blame-Game, baby. Don’t hate the Blamer. Hate the Blame.

  16. 16

    jobiuspublius — you are either a fool or completely ignorant of United States history (or perhaps both) if you think President George W. Bush is the worst president in history. I can only hope you are young and therefore familiar with only one or two presidents, thereby giving us all hope that you may some day gain some perspective and relative maturity. Although your inventive use of capitalization and punctuation really does stick it to the man.

    Do yourself a favor and go read a few books before embarrassing yourself in front of the adults.

  17. 17
    JorgXMckie says:

    Well, jobiuspublius is either not old enough to remember Carter or was unconscious for the four years he served. I suspect he’s just another leftie with no real argument. Flinging feces seems to be all the rage from that side.

  18. 18
    John S. says:

    Do yourself a favor and go read a few books before embarrassing yourself in front of the adults.

    Yes, I’m sure you are old enough to remember Old Hickory himself.

    Jackson – now there’s a President…

  19. 19
    John S. says:

    JorgXMckie-

    Well, jobiuspublius is either not old enough to remember Carter or was unconscious for the four years he served.

    An interesting theory.

    Perhaps you could offer us the following analysis:

    Compare and contrast the flaws in the policies of Jimmy Carter with George W. Bush based on both their Domestic and Foreign policies. Please group your comparisons by A) Policies set during 1976-1980 vs. 2000-2004 and B) Immediate impact of the policies set forth in A) during 1981 vs. 2005.

    I suspect he’s just another leftie with no real argument. Flinging feces seems to be all the rage from that side.

    I look forward to your fecal-free argument.

  20. 20
    jobiuspublius says:

    Let’s take a look at Louisiana’s Federal Senators and Representatives.

    On the One Hand:
    1) U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La.
    2) U.S. Rep. William Jefferson, D-New Orleans
    3) U.S. Rep. Charles “Charlie” Melancon, D-Napoleonville

    On the Other:
    1) U.S. Sen. David Vitter, R-La.
    2) U.S. Rep. Richard Baker, R-Baton Rouge
    3) U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, R-Lafayette
    4) U.S. Rep. Jim McCrery, R-Shreveport
    5) U.S. Rep. Bobby Jindal, R-Kenner
    6) U.S. Rep. Rodney Alexander, R-Quitman

    Oh oh, that’s not fair and balanced. I feel so sorry for the Dominant Party that I’ll cut them some slack and toss in Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, D-La. and Mayor Ray Nagin, D-New Orleans. Aw, we’re still short. But, not for fair and balanced! Let the Blame-Game begin! WEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    That article is a hatchet job, primarily on Blanco.

  21. 21
    Tim says:

    Unbelievable. Notwithstanding the utterly counter-productive politicization of disaster response to the New Orleans flooding and Hurricane Katrina, the beyond facile “comparison” of party registration of elected officials, regardless of responsibility (what but an ill-informed moron believes any American legislator anywhere has executive authority for any function in government outside of the legislative body to which he or she is elected?) is an exercise in unrestrained idiocy.

    Regardless, a serious effort, which an overtly politicized process is highly unlikely to produce in any event, would accurately identify reasons for the nearly inexhaustible list of failures and, where appropriate, lead voters in all concerned jurisdictions to hold culpable officials accountable. Otherwise, we’ll end up with the same perversion the “9/11 Commission” turned out to be…which is clearly what too many people want, since the flood/hurricane is just yet another opportunity to sharpen political hatchets. Too bad for the rest of us.

  22. 22
    Semanticleo says:

    Kunstsler has an excellent Hurricane related piece in ClusterFuck Nation.

    He says both parties are going to take it on the public chin when the shortage of natural gas(more infrastructurally inflexible than oil) for heating homes in the winter hits the foo-fan.

    Dems will have less blame but Kuntsler adds; “The Democrats will have to prove that they don’t deserve to join the Whigs in the Hall of Extinct Parties.”

  23. 23
    jobiuspublius says:

    Unbelievable. Notwithstanding the utterly counter-productive politicization of disaster response to the New Orleans flooding and Hurricane Katrina, the beyond facile “comparison” of party registration of elected officials, regardless of responsibility (what but an ill-informed moron believes any American legislator anywhere has executive authority for any function in government outside of the legislative body to which he or she is elected?) is an exercise in unrestrained idiocy.

    That’s exactly what the article did. It mentions Vitter, Landrieu, and Blanco. It mentions their party affiliation. It mentions Blanco’s role in crafting the legislation. It mentions that the entire LA fed delegation endorsed it. It DOES NOT mention the party affiliation of names of the entire LA fed delegation. If it had been consistant and mentioned the names, party affiliation, and comments of the entire LA delegation then it would have had a different slant.

    BTW, if LA reps are endorsing Senate legislation then you would expect for them to look for something similar in the House of Reps, no? What will the story look like then?

  24. 24

    Is Reality the biggest victim of Katrina?

    Now that Rita has come and gone, the analysts, politicians and pundits have have their opportunity to adjust their opinions about the response of Katrina, especially in light of the Rita evacuation.  You’d have thought that people would reco…

  25. 25

    Well, no John S., I wasn’t around for Old Hickory’s presidency. But what has that got to do with anything? Oh goodness me, are you saying that I (or anyone else) can only comment on presidents who were alive while we are alive? What nonsense. Maybe that’s why I suggested he go read some history, as adults are wont to do, or did you quit reading history when you left high school? Reading history is how I learned about Andrew Jackson and what he did that got him to the presidency. I’m guessing that how everyone alive today learned about Andrew Jackson.

    FWIW, while I consider my approach to foreign policy poitively Jacksonian in nature, my feelings towards Andrew Jackson’s presidency are decidedly mixed. He was a little too much of a populist for my tastes and his mistreatment of Native Americans was harsh even for his times.

    I will concur that virtually anonymous commenting tends towards the vitriolic and hyperbolic, but young jp continues to embarrass himself as his convictions seem to be inversely proportional to his knowledge of what he is talking about. But hey, I’ve come to learn that shouting makes your argument much stronger.

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  1. Is Reality the biggest victim of Katrina?

    Now that Rita has come and gone, the analysts, politicians and pundits have have their opportunity to adjust their opinions about the response of Katrina, especially in light of the Rita evacuation.  You’d have thought that people would reco…

  2. Who’s complaining about whose exaggerations?

    Everybody makes mistakes, and I try not to dwell on assigning blame because it isn’t generally productive of much. Usually when someone tries to avoid responsibility for assigning blame to others, I’m not terribly impressed, unless it appears that th…

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