A Challenge To You

Now that the turnout had been high enough to become difficult to deligitimize, some on the left will have to turn elsewhere for cynicism and criticism. Here is your challenge- Be the first to find a left-wing pundit or blogger who states some version of the following-

“It’s amazing. Bush can run an election in Iraq, but he can’t run a fair one here in the United States.”

-or-

“I don’t trust the results in Iraq. BushCo are masters at fixing elections.”

If you are giggling, it is because you know someone will say it.

As an extra challenge, look for press attempts to change the story. I just heard a reporter on MSNBC state that now the problem is that the turnout was so high that Iraqi’s don’t believe the results. I couldn’t believe my ears.

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21 replies
  1. 1
    Terry says:

    Oliver “David Brock Comfort Cushion” Willis weighed in with this: “You know, I really wish Iraq were having an honest, safe, real election. But that isn’t happening, and that’s a shame.”

  2. 2
    Kathy K says:

    Although I think Terry wins it, here’s an offering from the talking dog.
    Most of the anti-war bloggers don’t seem to be saying much at all.

  3. 3

    How about this:

    “But it is also true, alas, that no matter how the voting turns out, the prospects for genuine democracy in Iraq are increasingly grim.”

  4. 4

    There’s a report that Saddam Hussein was heard screaming from his cell, “Whaddya mean I didn’t elected dog catcher?”

  5. 5
    caltechgirl says:

    heh. That second one was left almost verbatim in the comments at Friends of Democracy…

  6. 6
    Dusty says:

    John Kerry just acknowledged on TV that an election has taken place in Iraq. BUT, he says, now comes the difficult part. Yeah, that ‘ol election was just a piece of cake. He is a total dufus!

  7. 7

    Speaking of Metafilter, here’s an interesting observation by one “pyramid termite”:

    “the real proof of democracy will be if the elected government demands the u s get out”

  8. 8
    Darleen says:

    How about this from “History Professor” Juan Cole

    “if the turnout is as light in the Sunni Arab areas as it now appears, the parliament/ constitutional assembly is going to be extremely lopsided. It would be sort of like having an election in California where the white Protestants all stayed home and the legislature was mostly Latinos, African-Americans and Asians.”

    Yeah, professor, the disgruntled former Saddamites which are only 20% of the population stay home and that “delegitamizes” the vote. Sheesh

  9. 9
    Darleen says:

    from Fisk

    What a bloody charade.

    via Bill at INDC

  10. 10
  11. 11
    Rob says:

    You heap scorn on Juan Cole as if any of you are experts, like he is, on the Middle East. Because you have no legitimate counterarguments to Cole’s, you resort to ad hominem attacks. You sound like a bunch of frat boys who never study and sit around drinking bad beer until you start believing your own ill-informed, juvenile opinions.

  12. 12
    TJ Jackson says:

    It appears the Iraqi elections were more democratic than those in Seattle or Chicago.

    Jaun Cole again demonstrates why academics aren’t responsible for their rantings.

  13. 13

    “It appears the Iraqi elections were more democratic than those in Seattle or Chicago.”

    I suspect that will be the spin on Air Moonbat come Monday–I suspect that they will be using that as a justification to bash GWB rather than to praise the Iraqis, though.

  14. 14
    Otter says:

    Hey, Robby: How ’bout heppin’ the brothers here at Kappa Sig to one fuckin’ thing Juan Cole has gotten right about one fuckin’ thing. Meanwhile, we’re tappin’ the keg.

  15. 15
    John Dunshee says:

    The Oct 24 2004 election in Kosovo was boycotted by the Serbs. Does this make it illegitimate too?

    No, because it was the UN, not the US that was running things.

  16. 16
    Aaron says:

    John Dunshee,

    Ah, but the UN was in charge of this election as well.

  17. 17
    Farix says:

    You heap scorn on Juan Cole as if any of you are experts, like he is, on the Middle East. Because you have no legitimate counterarguments to Cole’s, you resort to ad hominem attacks.

    What better counterargument do you need then the fact that he has been proven to be wrong time and time and time again?

  18. 18
    Michael says:

    OK. Ill take that challenge.

    Go here: http://pekingduck.org/

    Dont forget to check out the Ducks personal bumper sticker, at the verrrry end of the lengthy post.

    Iraqi elections
    My immediate impulse is to be guardedly pleased with the seemingly good news of Iraq’s first true elections. It seems to tell me that the majority of Iraqis do not want to see the insurgents win (otherwise, why would they vote?), and that they really do crave this important freedom to choose their leaders.
    On the other hand, Iraq is such a mess that no matter who wins, it’ll take a long time before we see any positive change. And, of course, the next government could take the country in an entirely unexpected direction and become another dictatorship. (Much stranger things have happened.)
    Finally, I saw a clip (via Kos) from a 1967 NY Times article (unlinkable) that reminded me that one election does not a robust democracy make:
    U.S. Encouraged by Vietnam Vote : Officials Cite 83% Turnout Despite Vietcong Terror
    by Peter Grose, Special to the New York Times (9/4/1967: p. 2)
    WASHINGTON, Sept. 3– United States officials were surprised and heartened today at the size of turnout in South Vietnam’s presidential election despite a Vietcong terrorist campaign to disrupt the voting.
    According to reports from Saigon, 83 per cent of the 5.85 million registered voters cast their ballots yesterday. Many of them risked reprisals threatened by the Vietcong.
    The size of the popular vote and the inability of the Vietcong to destroy the election machinery were the two salient facts in a preliminary assessment of the nation election based on the incomplete returns reaching here.

    Deja vu all over again, no? It’s something to think about, though I honestly believe the political situation in Iraq is diferent enough from Vietnam in 1967 to offer at least a glimmer of hope. For one, the Iraqis are more urbane and better educated than was the average Vietnamese, and most Vietnamese adored our perceived enemy Ho Chi Minh; in Iraq, the insurgents are supported by a minority (although the US occupation is opposed by a majority). The only thing I can say with certainty is that things are incredibly dicey right now.
    We’ll see, right?
    Dj vu all over again, no?

    No. Nothing like it.

    The Iraqis are more urbane and better educated than was the average Vietnamese, and most Vietnamese adored our perceived enemy[,] Ho Chi Minh. [Ed. Students, think boat people, OK? And, no. I am not talking about Florida. Got it? And, this perceived enemy thing, was then and is now, real. OK?]

    Still, the sign says it all. Dont blame me.

    And, I wont blame the Duck.

    I wont blame Kerry, either.

    I lay full responsibility at the feet of 43, I mean 44, a 150,000 or so of his minions and about 8 million Iraqis with those really kewl purple fingers.

    Now, that is a fashion statement.

    Hmm. Condi in purple in 08? That works for me, especially if she gets all muscular like the Williams sisters and starts kicking.

    But, just what would the Manolo [http://men.shoeblogs.com/] say? For, the man must always be dressed for the occasion.

  19. 19

    Iraqis Give Zarqawi the (ink-stained) Finger

    I'm proud to be an American every day.  But today, I'm especially proud.*

    If you have time today, take John Cole's challenge.

  20. 20

    Iraqis vote – who’s happy, who’s not

    AP “news” service reportsWASHINGTON – Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the Iraqi elections went “better than expected” Sunday, despite conflicting reports about the extent of voter turnout in areas plagued by intimidation and violence. She also…

  21. 21

    Blogospheric Round-Up: Elections in Iraq

    A trip around the Blogosphere (and yes, with a heavy dose of my blogroll, although not exclusively):

    From on the ground, Omar at IRAQ THE MODEL has post called “The People have won.” The money quote:I walked forward to my station, cast my vote an…

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Blogospheric Round-Up: Elections in Iraq

    A trip around the Blogosphere (and yes, with a heavy dose of my blogroll, although not exclusively):

    From on the ground, Omar at IRAQ THE MODEL has post called “The People have won.” The money quote:I walked forward to my station, cast my vote an…

  2. Iraqis vote – who’s happy, who’s not

    AP “news” service reportsWASHINGTON – Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the Iraqi elections went “better than expected” Sunday, despite conflicting reports about the extent of voter turnout in areas plagued by intimidation and violence. She also…

  3. Iraqis Give Zarqawi the (ink-stained) Finger

    I'm proud to be an American every day.  But today, I'm especially proud.*

    If you have time today, take John Cole's challenge.

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